1st ever thanksgiving

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Pwingsx
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RE: 1st ever thanksgiving 2003/11/05 23:51:23 (permalink)
Courgette,

I really have enjoyed hearing about your attempt to do an American Thanksgiving this year.

I will probably sound like a total dope, but I am a big fan of Rosamund Pilcher novels, and I wondered if you might be able to enlighten me on some food she has mentioned in her books? I know she's generally talking Welsh or Scottish, but would that still be similar?

What is mince? Is it hamburger, or ground up beef? How is it cooked? What is it served with? And what's the deal with baked beans on toast? Is that really something special?

I saw the Two Fat Ladies on the Food Network having bacon sandwiches and I must say, they sounded WONDERFUL. Can you tell me what they are? Is it roasted bacon on buns, or how is it done?

What is bread sauce? It always mentions it served with roast chicken, and I think it sounds kind of delicious.

And do you guys really boil bacon?
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Argent
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RE: 1st ever thanksgiving 2003/11/06 00:17:50 (permalink)
If you are serving Wine , A good gvertzaminer, A german style white goes very well with turkey.
#32
courgettefan
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RE: 1st ever thanksgiving 2003/11/06 07:56:15 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by Pwingsx

Courgette,

I really have enjoyed hearing about your attempt to do an American Thanksgiving this year.

I will probably sound like a total dope, but I am a big fan of Rosamund Pilcher novels, and I wondered if you might be able to enlighten me on some food she has mentioned in her books? I know she's generally talking Welsh or Scottish, but would that still be similar?

What is mince? Is it hamburger, or ground up beef? How is it cooked? What is it served with? And what's the deal with baked beans on toast? Is that really something special?

I saw the Two Fat Ladies on the Food Network having bacon sandwiches and I must say, they sounded WONDERFUL. Can you tell me what they are? Is it roasted bacon on buns, or how is it done?

What is bread sauce? It always mentions it served with roast chicken, and I think it sounds kind of delicious.

And do you guys really boil bacon?


mince is ground up beef. i do think you call it hamburger, which is why i thought i was going to stuff a turkey with made up cheeseburgers you use it in all sorts of receipies. you can use it to make shepards pie, spagetti bolongaise, chilli con carne....stuff like that. my friends boyfriend is scottish and always is eating 'meat and tatties' which i think is horrific. he just eats minced meat cooked in a frying pan with oil and onions and gravy served with boiled potatos.

baked beans on toast is not really special.....but it's cheap and easy, filling and nearly everyone likes it. my boyfriend has told me that he thinks ameircan baked beans are different to the ones we get over here.....that your baked beans are thicker and darker. ours have a tomato sauce on them kind of like what you get on spagettii hoops. and our bread is different, i've had american bread and it's much lighter. you can eat it for breakfast, lunch or dinner/tea. and where i live, in london, there are thousands and thousands of little greasy spoon cafes which sell beans on toast all day long. along with sausages, chips, mushrooms, bubble and sqeak, toast, fried bread, fried eggs.....you usually pick either a set all day breakfast type thing, or pick different items from the menu and have either tomato sauce or hp/brown/daddies sauce with the meal and loads of cups of tea. these places are really cheap. and usually full of builders and plumbers in their work wear reading the tabloids.

i love bacon sandwiches. the way i do it is grill the bacon rashers, toast the bread and have it with no butter and loads of kethcup. (btw load of old ppl here call ketchup 'red sauce'.). if you to cafe for your bacon sandwich it will probably be fried, and you will get butter on the toast. most ppl like brown sauce on their bacon sandwiches. i could eat one now actually. it's made with just normal plain cheap bacon rashers, and normal cheap white sliced bread.

here is a recipie for bread sauce : www.bbc.co.uk/northamptonshire/christmas/ultimate_dinner_02.shtml#bread

youre right, it's served with chicken or turkey or goose....and at roast dinners or xmas dinners. it's one of those things we never had at my family for xmas or sunday roasts, but it is gorgeous. one of my mates always screams 'i could drink the jug of it' whenever he's near bread sauce.

and yes ppl really do boil bacon. vile vile vile. my stepdad used to insist on boiling a huge joint of bacon in a metal saucepan on xmas eve every year, even though me and my sister would complain it smelt of cat food. then it's served up with bread and salad and salad cream and pickled onions and branston pickle with all the leftover turkey, chipolatas on sticks, stuffing and bread as a 'buffet' for what seems like eternity after xmas.


#33
Rick F.
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RE: 1st ever thanksgiving 2003/11/06 08:30:31 (permalink)
This has been fascinating. Here's a link to[url='http://www.hwatson.force9.co.uk/index.htm']Helen's British Cooking Site[/url], which I've also found interesting. It answers a lot of questions.
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Pwingsx
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RE: 1st ever thanksgiving 2003/11/06 12:49:15 (permalink)
Hey, Rick, thanks for the site.

Hey Courgette, thanks for all the answers. I love this stuff. I will definitely try the bread sauce with a roasted chicken, sounds just yummy.

Branston pickle is another thing I was wondering about, what's in it? And what's in piccalilly? I'm sure I spelled that wrong.
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kland01s
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RE: 1st ever thanksgiving 2003/11/06 13:36:20 (permalink)
I remember piccalilly as a kid in the 50's, I think they call it hamburger relesh now. Isn't it chopped fine pickles and something else??
#36
Rick F.
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RE: 1st ever thanksgiving 2003/11/07 09:56:18 (permalink)
[url='http://www.cooking.com/recipes/']Cooking.com[/url], although commercial, has a ton of information, too.
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EliseT
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RE: 1st ever thanksgiving 2003/11/07 14:25:30 (permalink)
Heinz baked beans imported from England come in a turquoise can and they are much better than any canned American beans. I like them with fried eggs...yum! And I rarely if ever think about Anne Margaret rolling around in them in the movie Tommy.
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1bbqboy
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RE: 1st ever thanksgiving 2003/11/07 15:01:54 (permalink)
Funny you should say that, elsie. you've hit on the subconscious image many of us have had of you. Elsie, in her slip, lustily rolling around
in a sumptuous vat of jambalaya while hangin' out in the crescent city
#39
Mayhaw Man
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RE: 1st ever thanksgiving 2003/11/07 17:56:08 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by EliseT

Heinz baked beans imported from England come in a turquoise can and they are much better than any canned American beans. I like them with fried eggs...yum! And I rarely if ever think about Anne Margaret rolling around in them in the movie Tommy.


At the risk of going totally off topic again....I can't help it....

I never, ever, see Heinz Baked Beans without thinking of rolling around in them WITH Ann Margaret.........

Now, back to our regularly scheduled topic
#40
Rick F.
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RE: 1st ever thanksgiving 2003/11/07 18:24:27 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by EliseT

Heinz baked beans. . . . And I rarely if ever think about Anne Margaret rolling around in them in the movie Tommy.
I have got to see that movie!
#41
Jennie
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RE: 1st ever thanksgiving 2003/11/07 20:11:02 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by courgettefan If i'm doing a sunday roast i usually mage sage and onion, because i love sage and onion stuffing. do you have this in america? would also like to try an american st uffing. what is pork and corn bread like?? does it go with turkey?


My husband is from England, and has lived in the U.S. since 1991, and he cooks. So perhaps we can offer some advice. The following is part hubby and part Jennie.

If you make up some cornbread from a packet mix, do not allow it to cook too dark. It should still be slightly moist when you crumble it. Mix this with a tin of sweet corn and about 4 oz. of chopped walnuts. Combine this with about 1/2 to 3/4 pound of good sausage meat, and use that as a stuffing. If you really want to tart it up, you can add mushrooms and minced onions. Use this as a regular stuffing, in the bird, as you would a chicken.

I've certainly never heard of stuffing a turkey (or anything else, for that matter) with hamburgers. With cheese or without.

And I have no earthly idea what a coke cake might be.

quote:
Originally posted by courgettefanare there any thanksgiving recipes that use courgettes?? esp. ones that can be made the night before. i have made courgette bread before, i got the recipe off the net. {snip} i have no idea what pan biscuits are!!! or broth!!! I thought broth was soup!!! and is ice tea the alcohoic one? we do plan to get as drunk as possible.


Pan biscuits would be similar to drop scones, but savoury.

Broth can either be eaten as a soup or used in cooking as a stock.

Most likely the iced tea is not alcoholic, but as someone suggested, hard cider would be perfectly appropriate. As would Gewurztraminer.

quote:
Originally posted by ocdreamr

One thing you might want to remember about an American Thanksgiving. America is a melting pot of nations. You can walk into 10 different homes on Thanksgiving & find 10 different meals. I have friends that are 1st generation Italian Americans & they have lasagne on their Thanksgiving table. I live in Baltimore, Maryland. Germans made up a large part of our early settlers here & saurkraut is a must have for the Thankgiving tables in Baltimore.


This is absolutely correct. There's no real wrong way to serve a Thanksgiving dinner, and it can vary by ethnicity and region.

Most Americans do serve Pumpkin Pie with their Thanksgiving Dinner, but I realise that's probably impossible. Hubby had never even seen tinned pumpkin until he came to this country. My mother makes it every year, but he's never really developed a taste for it. So she makes an apple pie, as well.

Every year I make the following for both Christmas and Thanksgiving dinner. I've translated the cup measurements into weight measurements using our handy-dandy kitchen scale and my measuring cups. It's quite different, sugar to flour to walnuts, really. If you can get fresh cranberries, you might try this. But if they aren't available until Christmas, you can use it then, too.

Cranberry Nut Bread

Zest and juice 1 orange. Bring to a boil enough water and orange juice to make 3/4 cup of liquid. Add the grated zest and 2 tablespoons of butter. Stir to melt butter.

In another bowl, beat 1 cup (8 oz.) sugar and 1 egg together. Stir into orange
mixture.

Add 1 cup (6 oz.) of chopped (cut in half) fresh cranberries and 1/2 cup (3 oz) of chopped walnuts.

Sift together 2 cups (10 oz.) of plain flour and 1/2 teaspoon each of salt and baking soda. Stir into first mixture.

Pour into greased loaf pan, and bake at 325 degrees for about an hour, or until toothpick comes out clean.


Good luck with your dinner!!


quote:
Originally posted by Pwingsx

Branston pickle is another thing I was wondering about, what's in it? And what's in piccalilly? I'm sure I spelled that wrong.


"Pickle" in the UK is what we here refer to as "relish." Chutney is a sweet variety. Branston Pickle is a type of chutney, which often includes apples, raisins, tamarind, vinegar, brown sugar, lemon or lime juice, eggplant, onion, and goodness knows what else. They spread it on sandwiches and eat it with cheese and pickled onions and French bread, which is referred to as a "Ploughman's Lunch." Piccalilly is a vegetable mustard pickle, bright yellow in colour.
#42
EliseT
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RE: 1st ever thanksgiving 2003/11/08 03:20:07 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by bill voss

Funny you should say that, elsie. you've hit on the subconscious image many of us have had of you. Elsie, in her slip, lustily rolling around
in a sumptuous vat of jambalaya while hangin' out in the crescent city


Oh, if only...
#43
Lone Star
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RE: 1st ever thanksgiving 2003/11/09 00:49:06 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by EliseT

quote:
Originally posted by bill voss

Funny you should say that, elsie. you've hit on the subconscious image many of us have had of you. Elsie, in her slip, lustily rolling around
in a sumptuous vat of jambalaya while hangin' out in the crescent city


Oh, if only...


OK - you people have now ruined Tennessee Willams for me. Elise I will now always carry a picture in my mind of Elizabeth Taylor in a Jambalaya stained slip. " />
#44
EliseT
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RE: 1st ever thanksgiving 2003/11/09 01:16:32 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by Lone Star

quote:
Originally posted by EliseT

quote:
Originally posted by bill voss

Funny you should say that, elsie. you've hit on the subconscious image many of us have had of you. Elsie, in her slip, lustily rolling around
in a sumptuous vat of jambalaya while hangin' out in the crescent city


Oh, if only...


OK - you people have now ruined Tennessee Willams for me. Elise I will now always carry a picture in my mind of Elizabeth Taylor in a Jambalaya stained slip. " />


...well then, don't forget the tumbler of Scotch!
#45
Rick F.
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RE: 1st ever thanksgiving 2003/11/09 01:30:19 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by Lone StarOK - you people have now ruined Tennessee Willams for me. Elise I will now always carry a picture in my mind of Elizabeth Taylor in a Jambalaya stained slip. " />
I hate to tell you this, but if somebody else can ruin ol' TW better than he did himself, it's a feat to be marveled at.
Rick, thinking wistfully of the 10 mil he gave to a little university. . . .
#46
Lone Star
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RE: 1st ever thanksgiving 2003/11/09 02:23:12 (permalink)
10 mil???!!! Well, I hope you at least got a tumbler of scotch!
#47
tiki
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RE: 1st ever thanksgiving 2003/11/09 08:36:49 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by Rick F.

quote:
Originally posted by tikiI also know that the simple act of breaking bread with someone makes it very difficult to shoot at them also---this is good!!
Heinlein?


Maybe-----but its an old family tradition at my house--we eat with EVERYONE!
#48
jmckee
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RE: 1st ever thanksgiving 2003/11/09 12:05:55 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by EliseT

quote:
Originally posted by Lone Star

quote:
Originally posted by EliseT

quote:
Originally posted by bill voss

Funny you should say that, elsie. you've hit on the subconscious image many of us have had of you. Elsie, in her slip, lustily rolling around
in a sumptuous vat of jambalaya while hangin' out in the crescent city


Oh, if only...


OK - you people have now ruined Tennessee Willams for me. Elise I will now always carry a picture in my mind of Elizabeth Taylor in a Jambalaya stained slip. " />


...well then, don't forget the tumbler of Scotch!


Or to quote Blanche DuBois...."Southern Comfort...How can that be I wonder...?"
#49
Dipstick
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RE: 1st ever thanksgiving 2003/11/09 20:58:28 (permalink)
Believe it or not, I have actually had a turkey stuffed with White Castles. The friend who did it got a bag of ten, sprinkled them with sage and celery salt, mashed them up, and went a stuffin'! It was a smaller turker( 8 lbs or so) but it wasn't bad at all. Albeit a stretch, it would work in a pinch with decent results.
#50
1bbqboy
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RE: 1st ever thanksgiving 2003/11/09 21:15:50 (permalink)
Then we have to ask: Are there any White Castles in England? It sounds like a tasty stuffing to me.
My guess is, courgettefan is baffled by the way this thread has gone.
#51
Jennie
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RE: 1st ever thanksgiving 2003/11/09 23:06:59 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by Dipstick

Believe it or not, I have actually had a turkey stuffed with White Castles. The friend who did it got a bag of ten, sprinkled them with sage and celery salt, mashed them up, and went a stuffin'! It was a smaller turker( 8 lbs or so) but it wasn't bad at all. Albeit a stretch, it would work in a pinch with decent results.


Argent, playing with the dog behind me, says, "Now, that is just wrong." lol

quote:
Originally posted by bill voss

Then we have to ask: Are there any White Castles in England?


No, they're all gray.
#52
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