About North Carolina sauce

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Heartbreaksoup
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2011/06/20 15:11:27 (permalink)

About North Carolina sauce

Here's something that I've been wondering about lately.
 
The principal (though by no means dominant) sauce style in north and middle Georgia is a red tomato/vinegar mix.  You can get this at an awful lot of places.  Roadfood-reviewed places in the region that use it include Harold's in Atlanta and Kelly's in Walnut Grove, but many, many others - Speedi-Pig, The Turn-Around, Troy's, and many more.
 
I'm not at all familiar with NC BBQ yet, sadly, but I'm confused by references to Lexington-area BBQ having a very distinctive sauce quite unlike what I recognize as (Eastern) NC vinegar sauce.  I read that Lexington BBQ sauce is... a tomato/vinegar mix.  Which is what I'm used to here.   Are we talking about the same stuff, or is there more to the Lexington-style sauce that I have not quite understood?
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    Captain Morgan
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    Re:About North Carolina sauce 2011/06/20 15:51:35 (permalink)
    hard for me to say without knowing your sauce, but I can
    tell you that Lexington style sauce is VERY thin....it does
    not cling to chicken or ribs, and is meant for pulled or chopped pork.  Is your sauce that thin?
    #2
    MiamiDon
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    Re:About North Carolina sauce 2011/06/20 16:11:46 (permalink)
    Interesting map:
     

     
     
    #3
    ann peeples
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    Re:About North Carolina sauce 2011/06/20 16:13:32 (permalink)
    I have had both-eastern style is pretty much tomato vinegar and spices only. Lexington, while I am sure has the same base, is much sweeter and somewhat thicker.
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    gregys
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    Re:About North Carolina sauce 2011/06/22 18:42:46 (permalink)
    I would like more informative local descriptions of sauces.
    Up here in Pa the mon valley style is NO sugar, and only mildly acidic. Tomato, celery, and other spices.

    Greg
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    Foodbme
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    Re:About North Carolina sauce 2011/06/23 04:03:09 (permalink)
    From Meathead @ Amazingribs.com :
    Barbecue Sauce Recipe: Lexington Dip.
    The debate over whether ketchup belongs in barbecue sauce has caused many a shouting match and even stirred a raucous debate in the North Carolina legislature. Some recipes omit the sugar, but I think it rounds out the flavor. The apple juice I use in mine is not standard, but I stole the idea from my favorite East Carolina sauce, George's, made in Nashville, NC. It really adds depth. Since it is mostly vinegar, it keeps a long time in the fridge.
    Yield: Makes about 1 1/2 cups. Preparation time: About 30 minutes.
    Ingredients
    1 cup distilled vinegar (do not use cider vinegar)
    1/4 cup ketchup
    1/4 cup apple juice
    1 teaspoon hot sauce
    3 tablespoons light brown sugar
    1/2 tablespoon salt
    1 teaspoon crushed red pepper
    1 teaspoon finely ground black pepper
    About the vinegar. I've seen both distilled and cider vinegar used in NC. I usually prefer cider vinegar in most of my sauce recipes because it has more flavor, but in this recipe I prefer distilled. Try both on meat and see which you prefer.
    Do this
    1) Whisk together all the ingredients and let them sit for at least three hours to allow the flavors to meld. Overnight is better. A week is best. The locals mop it on the meat with a basting brush once every hour while cooking. I'm not a fan of mopping, it just lets heat and humidity out, but if you want to be authentic, get in and out in a hurry. Me? I'll mop just once or twice near the end of the cook. If you do mop good silicon brush is best. It holds lots of fluid and is easy to clean. A lot of places still use string mops, but I think these are to hard to clean and potential sources of food poisoning.
    2) Before serving, take the remaining mop and boil it to sterilize it. With a clean brush, to prevent contamination by a brush used on uncooked meat, mop the meat one last time. Serve the sauce in a cruet on the side so your guests can drizzle on more if they wish. Leftovers will keep for months in the refrigerator.
     
    #6
    ann peeples
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    Re:About North Carolina sauce 2011/06/23 05:47:50 (permalink)
    Ok, my friend-lets see the other..
    #7
    brisketboy
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    Re:About North Carolina sauce 2011/06/23 09:07:27 (permalink)
    Down here, if you need sauce, there's something wrong.
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    gregys
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    Re:About North Carolina sauce 2011/06/23 10:40:50 (permalink)
    Agree with good cook no sauce needed. The sauce I use has minimal effe ct. It just adds some veggie flavor. If a sauce tastes good when you lick it, it's too strong!!!

    Greg
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    Sundancer7
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    Re:About North Carolina sauce 2011/06/23 11:02:00 (permalink)
    In my personal opinion only, it is what you grow up with is what you enjoy.  I have had NC BBQ many times and quite frankly, the vinegar taste does not agree with me.  It is only because I did not grow up with it.  I personally enjoy a sweet sauce but I have met many folks who totally enjoy the Carolina sauce but personally with me, it is not my thing.
     
    Paul E. Smith
    Knoxville, TN
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    MetroplexJim
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    Re:About North Carolina sauce 2011/06/23 11:16:48 (permalink)
    ann peeples

    I have had both-eastern style is pretty much tomato vinegar and spices only. Lexington, while I am sure has the same base, is much sweeter and somewhat thicker.

    Eastern-style contains no tomato and no water:  apple cider vinegar and spices only.  It packs a powerful, hot-spicy kick.  From our pantry -  the ingredients from a Scott's Sauce bottle:  vinegar, salt, peppers & spiceswww.scottsbarbecuesauce.com .
     
    "Lexington-style" contains ketchup and a bunch of other stuff as described in the recipe above.  It is a thin, watery, bland stuff they call "dip". 
    post edited by MetroplexJim - 2011/06/23 17:31:55
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    MetroplexJim
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    Re:About North Carolina sauce 2011/06/23 18:00:21 (permalink)
    brisketboy

    Down here, if you need sauce, there's something wrong.


    Eastern Carolina smoked whole hog is the real-deal, original barbecue.
     
    Texans have a time-consuming method of rendering a cheap cut of beef tender enough for humans to eat, thus saving it from canine consumption.
     
    And the process is labor & wood intensive enough to sell "the product" for $9.99/lb (more if you're at a place with a "reputation"). 
     
    They call that process "barbeque".

    I call it skillful t*rd-polishing!
     
    BTW: Shined up real good with lots of wood smoke, I enjoy my brisket with Lea & Perrins Worcestershire sauce.
    post edited by MetroplexJim - 2011/06/23 18:07:18
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    gregys
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    Re:About North Carolina sauce 2011/06/23 19:23:02 (permalink)
    MetroplexJim

    ann peeples

    I have had both-eastern style is pretty much tomato vinegar and spices only. Lexington, while I am sure has the same base, is much sweeter and somewhat thicker.

    Eastern-style contains no tomato and no water:  apple cider vinegar and spices only.  It packs a powerful, hot-spicy kick.  From our pantry -  the ingredients from a Scott's Sauce bottle:  vinegar, salt, peppers & spiceswww.scottsbarbecuesauce.com .

    "Lexington-style" contains ketchup and a bunch of other stuff as described in the recipe above.  It is a thin, watery, bland stuff they call "dip". 


    I'm a vinegar lover. I suck on vitamin c tabs. I can eat lemons.
    I love Scotts on everything. Fries, Chineese rice, any kind of rice, I don't put it on ice cream.
    I also make up my own batch, and easy to make.
    Scotts should be in everyone's fridge.

    BUT, again, my sauce is not sweet ot vinegary. Just a hint of vinegary. 9 out of 10 people would prefer our style sauce to others. It's just the way we do it.


    Think tomato, celery, celery seed, carrots, oregano, marjoram, clove, cinnamon, pepper, and you get the flavor.

    Greg
    Greg
    post edited by gregys - 2011/06/23 19:27:43
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    MetroplexJim
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    Re:About North Carolina sauce 2011/06/24 08:06:58 (permalink)
    I was born & raised in Eighty-Four.  We visited Finleyville often as our banker, John Jones, and our physician, Doc Stevenson, were across Washington Ave. from each other.  The prettiest girl I knew growing up lived on Roy St.; I believe she still does.
     
    So, how does a good Pittsburgh boy like you come to know the wonders of Scott's Sauce?  In my case, my best friend came from Eastern NC and we used to drive down from the Shenandoah Valley on occasional weekends to "play cards".  On those trips EC 'cue was all we ate.
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    QFan
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    Re:About North Carolina sauce 2011/06/24 09:16:08 (permalink)
    MetroplexJim

    brisketboy

    Down here, if you need sauce, there's something wrong.


    Eastern Carolina smoked whole hog is the real-deal, original barbecue.

    Texans have a time-consuming method of rendering a cheap cut of beef tender enough for humans to eat, thus saving it from canine consumption.

    And the process is labor & wood intensive enough to sell "the product" for $9.99/lb (more if you're at a place with a "reputation"). 

    They call that process "barbeque".

    I call it skillful t*rd-polishing!

    BTW: Shined up real good with lots of wood smoke, I enjoy my brisket with Lea & Perrins Worcestershire sauce.

     
    DITTO to everything Jim is saying!!!
    Texans just can't seem to get past being Texans in everything including food, and especially que. It's just a different world down there.
     
    QFan
    Bonita Springs, FL
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    brisketboy
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    Re:About North Carolina sauce 2011/06/24 09:22:12 (permalink)
    It may be skillfull turd polishing but they're laughing all the way to the ATM.
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    MetroplexJim
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    Re:About North Carolina sauce 2011/06/24 09:29:38 (permalink)
    QFan

    MetroplexJim

    brisketboy

    Down here, if you need sauce, there's something wrong.


    Eastern Carolina smoked whole hog is the real-deal, original barbecue.

    Texans have a time-consuming method of rendering a cheap cut of beef tender enough for humans to eat, thus saving it from canine consumption.

    And the process is labor & wood intensive enough to sell "the product" for $9.99/lb (more if you're at a place with a "reputation"). 

    They call that process "barbeque".

    I call it skillful t*rd-polishing!

    BTW: Shined up real good with lots of wood smoke, I enjoy my brisket with Lea & Perrins Worcestershire sauce.


    DITTO to everything Jim is saying!!!
    Texans just can't seem to get past being Texans in everything including food, and especially que. It's just a different world down there.

    QFan
    Bonita Springs, FL



     
    I'm half expecting them to slaughter a steer in my driveway, cut down my trees, and dig a pit in my front yard.  Lucky I got the twin-pak of king-size Lea & Perrins yesterday at COSTCO.  If I put on my "W - The President" golf shirt maybe I'll be safe!  
    #17
    brisketboy
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    Re:About North Carolina sauce 2011/06/24 10:23:23 (permalink)
    W the prez and Rick Perry and you might be safe.
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    gregys
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    Re:About North Carolina sauce 2011/06/24 11:06:20 (permalink)
    MetroplexJim

    I was born & raised in Eighty-Four.  We visited Finleyville often as our banker, John Jones, and our physician, Doc Stevenson, were across Washington Ave. from each other.  The prettiest girl I knew growing up lived on Roy St.; I believe she still does.

    So, how does a good Pittsburgh boy like you come to know the wonders of Scott's Sauce?  In my case, my best friend came from Eastern NC and we used to drive down from the Shenandoah Valley on occasional weekends to "play cards".  On those trips EC 'cue was all we ate.


    I was searching for non sweet sauces and someone suggested Scotts. I ordered a case.
    I actually live in Jefferson hills, former pleasant hills resident.

    Greg
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    MetroplexJim
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    Re:About North Carolina sauce 2011/06/25 08:48:39 (permalink)
    brisketboy

    W the prez and Rick Perry and you might be safe.


    I trust that you can see from my "pokes" at Texas BBQ that we do in fact enjoy it.  And, we enjoy being transplants to the Republic of Texas where the most typical comment on politics & economics is "What recession?".
     
    By culture and custom, my wife does not eat pork so our typical BBQ venture has her getting brisket while I get unsauced pulled pork which I then season with my trusty bottle of Scott's Sauce.  As she's a size 2 and I'm a 50 long I get to finish up her brisket after I'm done with my pig-fest.  That is a better dessert than 'nana puddin' 'n Nilla Vanillas (which is for some reason a Texas BBQ 'staple').
     
    BTW:  I told my fellow faculty members three months ago that Perry was going to run.  They laughed then; they ain't laughing now.  Imagine a farmer who served in the military and who has no law degree running for President.  Wait a minute, I think that's happened before ... in fact, some of those gentlemen drafted the 9th. and 10th. Amendments that presently so animate the Governor. 
    post edited by MetroplexJim - 2011/06/25 08:54:01
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