April 18, 2006

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BT
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2006/03/29 12:24:50 (permalink)

April 18, 2006

Will be the 100th anniversary of the Great San Francisco Earthquake. Much commemerative activity is planned (starting with the traditional early monring gathering at Lotta's Fountain downtown), but the Chronicle today published this interesting demonstration of the fault rupture using supercomputers that I thought might be interesting to everyone:

http://sfgate.com/cgi-bin/object/article?f=/c/a/2006/03/29/MNG40HVPV41.DTL&o=0&type=science

Hints: Best viewed with Quicktime. Even if you get a "failed to load" error message, try clicking the "play" button and be patient--it's apparently busy.
#1

19 Replies Related Threads

    Scorereader
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    RE: April 18, 2006 2006/03/29 13:29:31 (permalink)
    it's not loading.
    too bad, I would've liked to have seen the computer models.

    #2
    BT
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    RE: April 18, 2006 2006/03/29 14:51:39 (permalink)
    If my link effort doesn't work for you (it does for me) try going to the Chron article and klicking on the icon there for the video: http://sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/c/a/2006/03/29/MNG40HVPV41.DTL&type=science

    Having been through one that lasted 15 seconds in 1989, I can tell you that 90 seconds of that must have been terrifying.
    #3
    Sundancer7
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    RE: April 18, 2006 2006/03/29 15:09:18 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by BT

    If my link effort doesn't work for you (it does for me) try going to the Chron article and klicking on the icon there for the video: http://sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/c/a/2006/03/29/MNG40HVPV41.DTL&type=science

    Having been through one that lasted 15 seconds in 1989, I can tell you that 90 seconds of that must have been terrifying.


    BT, if the one in 1989 was the one that happened during the World Series, I was watching. The TV cameras focused on the downtown area and the fires.

    That one was a mess. I can't imagine what the one in 1906 was like.

    Paul E. Smith
    Knoxville, TN
    #4
    Scorereader
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    RE: April 18, 2006 2006/03/29 17:03:17 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by BT

    If my link effort doesn't work for you (it does for me) try going to the Chron article and klicking on the icon there for the video: http://sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/c/a/2006/03/29/MNG40HVPV41.DTL&type=science

    Having been through one that lasted 15 seconds in 1989, I can tell you that 90 seconds of that must have been terrifying.


    it probably works for you because you've already loaded into your computer. The link isn't loading.

    On a tour of Haight-Ashbury, there a place where you're looking down over the entire city. It's at that point in the tour, you can really get a sense of how much property was destroyed in 1906, when you realize there aren't but a few buildings that actually predate 1906 until you get to nearly Haight-Ashbury.

    I remember the seeing world series quake on tv. That one got lots of air-play on the news and ESPN.

    #5
    lleechef
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    RE: April 18, 2006 2006/03/29 17:52:41 (permalink)
    Yesterday marked the 42nd anniversary of the 1964 quake in Alaska, the strongest earthquake in North America, 9.2 on the Ricter scale. It lasted about 3 minutes. Good thing the area wasn't as populated as the Bay City! http://earthquake.usgs.gov/regional/states/events/1964_03_28.php
    #6
    Sundancer7
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    RE: April 18, 2006 2006/03/29 17:58:43 (permalink)
    Lisa, I have been to the park in Anchorage. I am not sure what they call it but I believe it was Earthquake Park?

    I visited it twice. I believe I read where perhaps several hundred feet fell into the ocean and many homes were destroyed. Perhaps it did a lot of damage to downtown?

    At least they did a nice thing to the area that was destroyed. I believe it is a bike/walking/running trail now?

    Very nice.

    Paul E. Smith
    Knoxville, TN
    #7
    BT
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    RE: April 18, 2006 2006/03/29 19:01:50 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by lleechef

    Yesterday marked the 42nd anniversary of the 1964 quake in Alaska, the strongest earthquake in North America, 9.2 on the Ricter scale. It lasted about 3 minutes. Good thing the area wasn't as populated as the Bay City! http://earthquake.usgs.gov/regional/states/events/1964_03_28.php



    There's a small museum in Valdez showing the effects of that one there--which included moving the towna good distance as I recall. Very dramatic.

    But the most graphic demonstration of what a quake could do to a modern city was probably Kobe, Japan in 1995:







    And here's a comparison of the seismographic records of the 1989 quake I experienced and the 1906 quake, both recorded in Germany:



    Not much comparison.
    #8
    BT
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    RE: April 18, 2006 2006/03/29 19:08:57 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by Scorereader


    On a tour of Haight-Ashbury, there a place where you're looking down over the entire city. It's at that point in the tour, you can really get a sense of how much property was destroyed in 1906, when you realize there aren't but a few buildings that actually predate 1906 until you get to nearly Haight-Ashbury.



    Here's the view to which you refer (it's actually from Twin Peaks):



    Large scale images are available here: http://www.sftravel.com/twinpeakssanfranciscopictures.html

    Incidentally, in the image above there's a grey, cube of a building toward the left side of the center of the picture. That's the Federal Building--I live just in front of and to the left of that in this picture.
    #9
    Kayleigh
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    RE: April 18, 2006 2006/03/29 19:23:31 (permalink)
    Our 1994 Northridge quake did far more damage than your 1989 quake. Yours was 50 miles away. The reason for the major damage which was only in two areas was one was a poorly designed freeway just asking to come down and the other was a neighborhood built on sand for a world's fair before they knew it was unsafe to do that.
    #10
    lleechef
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    RE: April 18, 2006 2006/03/29 19:27:01 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by Sundancer7

    Lisa, I have been to the park in Anchorage. I am not sure what they call it but I believe it was Earthquake Park?

    I visited it twice. I believe I read where perhaps several hundred feet fell into the ocean and many homes were destroyed. Perhaps it did a lot of damage to downtown?

    At least they did a nice thing to the area that was destroyed. I believe it is a bike/walking/running trail now?

    Very nice.

    Paul E. Smith
    Knoxville, TN

    You are right it is called Earthquake Park. 75 homes were destroyed (a lot for Anchorage in 1964). It is now the Tony Knowles Coastal Trail, used for skiing, biking, walking and wildlife viewing. Nearly all of Valdez, Seward and Whittier were wiped out by the tsunami that followed the quake.

    Those pictures of Japan are frightening.
    #11
    BT
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    RE: April 18, 2006 2006/03/29 20:23:29 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by Kayleigh

    Our 1994 Northridge quake did far more damage than your 1989 quake. Yours was 50 miles away. The reason for the major damage which was only in two areas was one was a poorly designed freeway just asking to come down and the other was a neighborhood built on sand for a world's fair before they knew it was unsafe to do that.


    Not to get into a "mine's bigger than yours" discussion, the effects of the Loma Prieta Quake went far beyond two neighborhoods in San Francisco (to completely ignore damage in San Jose and other communities closer to the epicenter). First of all, there was the little matter of the Bay Bridge--broken and shut down for over a month requiring me to commute to Oakland by ferry. But there was less dramatic damage all over town. My own apartment building, not in the Marina and built in 1982 of steel and reinforced concrete, required about $70,000 in repairs. City Hall had to be braced up for nearly a decade until base isolation and elaborate renovation could be installed. In the Opera House, a huge net hung for 5 years or so to keep more plaster, loosened by the quake, from falling on patrons. Once I had a freeway outside my window (the so-called "Central Freeway"). Simlar in construction to the Cypress Freeway in Oakland that collapsed, it was damaged so much that CalTrans shut it down and eventually tore it down, replacing it with a surface roadway (the Embarcadero Freeway along the bayfront met a similar fate).

    Incidentally, the Marina District of San Francisco was not "built on sand for the World's Fair". It was built on rubble from the 1906 quake--buldozed into the Bay because there was nowhere else to put it.
    Six years later, the World's Fair was, indeed, built over the rubble (which had a certain symbolic significance in itself since the fair was intended to show the City's dramatic rebirth).
    #12
    Kayleigh
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    RE: April 18, 2006 2006/03/29 21:36:07 (permalink)
    Thanks for the history. We forget about things quicker that didn't affect us.
    I do have to point out though that the bay bridge busted by plan. It did what it was supposed to do in that situation. The other double decker freeways were terrible designs. Peace
    #13
    BT
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    RE: April 18, 2006 2006/03/30 01:19:10 (permalink)
    If you want to see a bridge doin' what it's supposed to do, check this out: http://csiberkeley.com/USGS/GoldenGateBridge.mov

    I was out in the middle of that sucker (along with 50,000 or so of my best friends) when this shot was taken at the Bridge's 50th Anniversary celebration. Note the deformity of the central span (between the towers):



    Believe me I would NOT want to be on it doin' what it's doin in the quake simulation. I missed being on the Bay Bridge in 1989 by about 1/2 and hour (I left work early to get home to watch the World Series game).
    #14
    kland01s
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    RE: April 18, 2006 2006/03/30 08:40:53 (permalink)
    I have seen the earthquake exhibit at the museum in Anchorage, very impressive! A good friend of mine is on a team of scientists developing a earthquake detection system, the website below explains some of their projects.

    http://www.nees.org/index.php
    #15
    Oneiron339
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    RE: April 18, 2006 2006/03/30 16:53:06 (permalink)
    As they say, "I don't know where I'm a gonna go when the volcano blows."
    #16
    BT
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    RE: April 18, 2006 2006/04/09 14:28:03 (permalink)
    Chronicle 10-day series on the Quake starts today. The first part is on what the city was like in 1906 before the quake. Sorry to bore some of you, but as a history fan I love this stuff: http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2006/04/09/BAGQ09QUAKE.DTL
    quote:
    San Francisco in 1906 was the largest city and most important port on the Pacific Coast, the financial center of the West, the ninth-largest city in the United States. The Palace was the biggest hotel in the West. City Hall was the largest public building west of Chicago. The Emporium on Market Street was the biggest department store in the West. San Francisco had the most populous Chinatown outside of Asia, the U.S. Mint at Fifth and Mission streets was the largest in the world, and in its vaults was $222 million in gold, one-third of the country's gold supplies. . . .

    San Francisco also had the so-called French Restaurants, multiple-story affairs, with legitimate family restaurants on the ground floor, and shady doings on the upper floors. No respectable woman, it was said, ever went above the first floor.

    The city was wide open with prostitution, drugs (opium was the drug of choice in 1906) and dance halls that never closed. Some things were too much, even for San Francisco. Crusaders, led by the Rev. Terrance Caraher -- "Terrible Terry" they called him -- had closed down the Hotel Nymphia on Pacific Street, an establishment with 300 prostitutes that had billed itself as the largest bordello in the world.

    Morton Street, near Union Square, was another street of open prostitution where ladies of the evening, with names like "Iodoform Kate" and "Rotary Rosie," held forth. The top performers charged $1, but sex was on sale for as little as 25 cents. Morton Street is now called Maiden Lane.

    Vice was a big business, and so was civic corruption. Eugene Schmitz, a handsome man with a salt-and-pepper beard, was mayor, but the real power was in the hands of Abe Ruef, a dapper lawyer who controlled the mayor and the 18-member Board of Supervisors. It was a group so crooked that Ruef joked they would eat the paint off a house.

    Ruef, head of the Union Labor Party, collected "lawyer's fees" from public utility companies, the shady French Restaurants and houses of prostitution. One bordello was so well connected with the city politicians that it was known as the Municipal Brothel. . . . .


    #17
    roossy90
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    RE: April 18, 2006 2006/04/10 15:29:46 (permalink)
    There was something on the the TV chronicling the earthquake.
    I learned many things watching it, such as the military pumping sea water into the city so the fireman could have water to pump down Van Ness (?) avenue so the fires wouldnt jump the road.

    PS.. to others....You need Quicktime for the link at the top.
    It loaded fine for me.
    #18
    roossy90
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    RE: April 18, 2006 2006/04/10 15:36:10 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by BT

    If you want to see a bridge doin' what it's supposed to do, check this out: http://csiberkeley.com/USGS/GoldenGateBridge.mov


    Believe me I would NOT want to be on it doin' what it's doin in the quake simulation. I missed being on the Bay Bridge in 1989 by about 1/2 and hour (I left work early to get home to watch the World Series game).

    That is a terrifying simulation of the bridge.. WOW>
    #19
    BT
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    RE: April 18, 2006 2006/04/10 20:31:20 (permalink)
    Van Ness Ave. is the street I live on. After 1906, the city built a system of cisterns under major intersections which are kept full of water that can be used to fight fires if the main water system goes dry as in 1906. They also bought 2 fireboats, one of which was used for to fight the Marina District fires in 1989.
    #20
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