BK Quadruple Stacker

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Tony Bad
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RE: BK Quadruple Stacker 2006/07/25 22:36:15 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by billyboy

Exactly, and no one is forced to eat the "healthy" options on the menu either. I'm just saying that people going to a fast food place should have an option other than "three OR four all-beef patties" or "fries or larger fries" with that.


They do have those options. One day, just for the sake of science, go see how many people actually order them. You'll find it ain't many. I stopped at Wendy's with my kids over the weekend. They had a turkey sandwich, cup of mandarin oranges, and lowfat milk. Most places offer similar choices, as well as a host of salads. What you seek is already there.

I share your enthusiasm for local places, but if you look thru the menus posted for most of the places listed on this site, you'll find far fewer healthy choices than the average fast food place. How does that fit into the "caring" portrait you paint?
#61
billyboy
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RE: BK Quadruple Stacker 2006/07/25 23:58:11 (permalink)
Good question, Tony. Fast food places definitely have those options now, which I think is a good thing. Whe I was a kid in the early 80s, FF very rarely if ever offered salads, low fat sandwiches, yogurt and fruit/milk for kids. My love for the local "roadfood" places is based on two things. One, food that actually tastes good and hasn't been processed in a factory somewhere but made from scratch on site that day or the day before. Two, that those who make the roadfood care about the food they make, meaning that their work isn't all about the dollar. Most if not all FF franchises have to conform to the corporate parent and fall in line with the practices that make the chain profitable. True, many road food places have food on their menus that isn't healthy to eat every day, but in moderation I think its a good thing. With FF chains, they are ubiquitous and almost impossible to miss. When I say caring, I don't mean in a touchy, feely, love-in kind of way, but many road food places cook food that is regional specialty ie: local fish, local beef, vegetables from the farmer/market down the street. Sometimes buying from local people they know and getting ingredients from the community when possible. The vision for most roadfood places doesn't include conquering the globe with their food, sales reports, and making more money than most third world countries, but rather upholding a tradition that was in their family or community. I don't know many roadfood establishments wthat have CEOs or are living large on their profits. Most of those who have, have earned it after building up an institution for the past 30-40 years and put a lot of heart into what they did. I'm willing to bet that the corporate CEOs who came in and ran a FF chain for a few years then got a golden parachute when they left spent much more time talking to stockholders and looking at sales projections than they ever did discussing the merits of fresh ingredients vs. frozen and what Bob did last week when he came in for his morning ham and grits. I love my BBQ, meat and three's, lobster shacks, ice creams parlors, and various other roadfood places, but I don't feel the need to eat at one of them every day of the week. I try to eat healthy: make my own lunch for work, get a salad with lots of veggies, cook at home some nights of the week (I love to cook anyway). I know I've got a lot of years to get to many roadfood places that I will enjoy and don't need to eat that way all the time.
#62
abe_froeman
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RE: BK Quadruple Stacker 2006/07/27 00:38:12 (permalink)
Right Tony, but they have better ingredients to work with and probably have more training and guidance- people who own their own business and really have it all on the line are going to want to put out a consistently good product, so it's in their best interest to make sure their workers, no matter how old or how much prior experience, are well-trained. You have a better chance of avoiding food poisoning going to a small family-owned place than a big chain because they don't have corporate lawyers and corporate money to take care of lawsuits.

I'm not saying people who get most of their meals from fast food places will be better off health-wise if they went to a local place rather than a chain (you can lead a horse to water, but you can't make him eat a salad) but there is a greater problem here with people whose main source of nutrition comes from any fast food place- poverty, lack of education, exploitation by the chain fast food places (see this: http://www.prb.org/Template.cfm?Section=PRB&template=/ContentManagement/ContentDisplay.cfm&ContentID=13932) problems that are ignored by the government and social services.
#63
Tony Bad
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RE: BK Quadruple Stacker 2006/07/27 09:16:01 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by abe_froeman

Right Tony, but they have better ingredients to work with and probably have more training and guidance- people who own their own business and really have it all on the line are going to want to put out a consistently good product, so it's in their best interest to make sure their workers, no matter how old or how much prior experience, are well-trained. You have a better chance of avoiding food poisoning going to a small family-owned place than a big chain because they don't have corporate lawyers and corporate money to take care of lawsuits.



I have worked in food service at all levels, from sweeping the parking lot at that famous Scottish place McDonalds to 5 star restaurants and I can tell you that in general, the "corporate" restaurants often have far better food handling and cleanliness standards than other places. I am not suggesting this makes them superior, but most fast food places have a definitive routine for cleaning and maintaining appropriate hygiene standards. Few of the private places I worked at had such routines or standards. I worked for a catering company that served meals at the White House, and their kitchen made the average fast food places look like a hospital surgical suite! The food sure was fine though!

The same goes for employees. The fast food places all have some degree of training. It may just be watching a video or looking through a book, but it is more than I have ever seen in most small or private places. My "training" in private places usually consisted of getting started and learning on the go. Smaller places often don't have the luxury of paying people to sit around and "be trained". They need help NOW!

Like you, I enjoy the experience of eating in non-chain places, and avoid fast food whenever a better option exists. I just don't think many of the arguments folks put forth against them are valid.

As for the social ills that lead people to exist on a fast food diets, poverty isn't really a good excuse. Feeding 4 people at a fast food joint will take at least $20, and their are plenty of other options for $20. The real problem is laziness. While waiting for food the other day at my local Chinese restaurant I saw a kid of about 10 drive up in a taxi, get out and pick up several bags of fast food to take home in the cab. Now there are several levels of lazy, (but not poverty) in there! I understand it, as often when my wife works late and I finish work and then have to make dinner, the temptation to pick up some takeout is strong, but I know I can do better at home.

As for why stores in some areas don't stock "healthy foods", that can be a chicken vs. egg matter. Sure you can say it is some conspiracy to deprive people of a healthy diet, or you can also view it as the store giving the people what they want. A store isn't going to stock things it can't sell. Certain grocery stores in my area cater toward Latinos, and have many different items that simply wouldn't sell in other neighborhoods. Conspiracy or just normal business practices? I guess it depends who you ask.

Anyway, I have strayed a long way from the BK Stacker. I do like those TV commercials!

I really like your expression "you can lead a horse to water, but you can't make him eat a salad". That is good!!
#64
WingLover
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RE: BK Quadruple Stacker 2006/07/28 15:32:47 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by Pigiron

Just checked the BK website. The quad stacker is 1000 calories, 68 grams of fat, 240 mg of cholesterol and 1800(!)mg of sodium. Sorry, but that is absolutely sickening.


That's pretty bad. But it isn't like similiar burgers made at any other chain (or nonchain!) would be any healthier for you...!

~Jessica
#65
phatphil
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RE: BK Quadruple Stacker 2006/08/09 19:38:52 (permalink)
what is a bk yumbo anyone?
#66
Billfish
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RE: BK Quadruple Stacker 2006/08/09 20:23:10 (permalink)
"Yumbo" was a hot ham and cheese sandwich sold by BK circa 70s-80s and maybe after.
#67
jjjrfoodie
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RE: BK Quadruple Stacker 2006/08/10 00:03:07 (permalink)
Just got a set of coupons in the mail from the "King" for a buy-one-get-one offer. Double, triple and quad stackers included for the buy-one-get-one.
If one Quad stacker is bad, is two of them more badder (sic)?
Yowsa.

I will try a double stacker soon though. BYO defribultors on my part.

#68
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