Beef tallow

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Sundancer7
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2007/11/28 11:45:20 (permalink)

Beef tallow

If you render suet down to oil, does that product beef tallow? Is beef tallow the most flavorful oil?

I read a lot (all) of Louis LaMour's western books and I recall reading that he indicated that bear fat was the most flavorful. He tended to be a writer that had a lot of facts in his books but I do not know about that one.

I feed my birds in the winter with kidney suet and they sure like it.

Paul E. Smith
Knoxville, TN
#1

20 Replies Related Threads

    divefl
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    RE: Beef tallow 2007/11/28 11:58:21 (permalink)
    I'm placing my money on Hoffman beign the only one to know the bear vs. beef question. I myself can't answer any of the questions.
    #2
    pamelakrest
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    RE: Beef tallow 2007/11/28 12:04:36 (permalink)
    Earlier this year I bought a 1/2 of beef and told the butcher I wanted all scraps,bones & fat...the butcher looked kinda funny at me, but said ok. I have 3 dogs that LOVE the huge beef bones when I bake them off for them.I took the scraps of beef & sheets of fat and rendered them down....slowly in a huge soup pot. I made tons of suet cakes ( and added scrap meat) with bird seed for the coming winter.
    I never thought of cooking with the rendered fat....might be good.
    I do know they do make soap from the beef & pork fat,because my Grandmother did....don't remember her ever cooking with the beef fat...just the rendered pork fat.
    Pamela
    #3
    rjb
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    RE: Beef tallow 2007/11/28 12:27:12 (permalink)
    Rendered beef fat (tallow) can be excellent for frying, particularly potatoes. McDonald's used it (combined with veg. oil I believe) for their fries for years until the food police made them stop about 10 years ago. Their fries haven't been as good since, maybe due to the artificial beef fat flavor they now add to their frying oil (or so I've heard).
    #4
    Lexi
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    RE: Beef tallow 2007/11/28 13:29:02 (permalink)
    I was asked to make kosher stuffing for Thanksgiving. My stuffing calls for bulk breakfast sausage, so I made a beef version with meat and fat bought at the kosher butcher. Thank God I had the meat grinder attachemnt for my Kitchen Aid mixer. After cooking off the sausage, I used the remaining fat to saute my veggies. The sausage and the stuffing were excellent!
    #5
    edwmax
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    RE: Beef tallow 2007/11/28 13:35:05 (permalink)
    From my Webster's:
    Suet is the hard fat from around the kidneys.
    Tallow is the hard tasteless white fat of beef, sheep & horses.

    These are the un-rendered animal fat. But, I have seen the rendered fat (like lard) in stores labeled as suet or tallow.
    #6
    MissKitty
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    RE: Beef tallow 2007/11/28 14:20:23 (permalink)
    Over here we call rendered beef fat " dripping ". Like most animal fats the taste and quality depends very much on the quality of the animal it comes from. I have not yet experienced bear fat but I certainly would count carefully rendered beef dripping, from a really good quality home roasted joint, as one of the tastiest treats there is, on a good thick slice of toast with a good sprinkle of coarse sea salt and of course, including some of the meat jelly from underneath.

    Also, many fish and chip shops in the Midlands and North used to cook their products in beef dripping and renowned thusly for the taste. These days, more of them cater for the vegetarian trade and cook in vegetable oils/fats and some say the flavour of the chips etc has suffered. It's defintely one of the best fats for cooking roast potatoes, roast parsnips and Yorkshire pudding :)
    #7
    rouxdog
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    RE: Beef tallow 2007/12/02 00:15:26 (permalink)
    OK, I,m gonna take this topic on. No authority am I. Sundancer, Louis LaMour's an an expert in his writings.
    To me, "tallow" takes on a little different meaning compared to our beloved fat. I'm quite a reader of 1800 US history. Tallow, seems to me, was used for far more than food.
    #8
    enginecapt
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    RE: Beef tallow 2007/12/02 02:06:25 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by rouxdog
    Tallow, seems to me, was used for far more than food.
    Candles, f'instance.
    #9
    brittneal
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    RE: Beef tallow 2007/12/02 02:46:30 (permalink)
    Working in good clubs we did tallow work. A snow white cube of formed tallow. These were carved into various center peices. No waste as we melted it down after use and remolded it.
    Never coooked with it, thi I swear by the flavor of lard and the flakiest pastry is made with kidney leaf lard.
    britt
    #10
    boyardee65
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    RE: Beef tallow 2007/12/02 03:32:22 (permalink)
    I love to use rendered fat from beef and use it for all kinds of applications! Excellent for breads, frying, and as the base fat for roux for any beef gravy. It is very volatile so I like to use it as soon as I can or freeze it in chunks that have been wrapped in plastic and then wrapped in foil and then put into zip top bags. To me, the flavor of beef fat and butter are very similar as they both have a low melting point and take on other flavors readily. I get mine from rendering bones, scrap trimmings, and left over fat from steaks. I use the rendered meat to make sauce beef demi-glace and use the fat for other applications.

    David O.
    #11
    ann peeples
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    RE: Beef tallow 2007/12/02 09:28:11 (permalink)
    Believe it or not, beef tallow used to be one of the ingredients in Twinkies...
    #12
    mr chips
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    RE: Beef tallow 2007/12/02 12:15:18 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by annpeeples

    Believe it or not, beef tallow used to be one of the ingredients in Twinkies...
    Wow!
    #13
    boyardee65
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    RE: Beef tallow 2007/12/03 00:22:34 (permalink)
    You are right! Beef and other fat tallows were used for a lot of applications. It was used to coat paper windows in cabins. Used in suet, fire making, candles, bread, lubricant, explosives etc....
    quote:
    Originally posted by rouxdog

    OK, I,m gonna take this topic on. No authority am I. Sundancer, Louis LaMour's an an expert in his writings.
    To me, "tallow" takes on a little different meaning compared to our beloved fat. I'm quite a reader of 1800 US history. Tallow, seems to me, was used for far more than food.
    #14
    007bond-jb
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    RE: Beef tallow 2007/12/05 12:17:14 (permalink)
    Maybe yall wasen't paying attention I posted this some time back: burgers with beef Tallow fries
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wo8YNPVz33w

    & they was real damm good
    #15
    tfrielin
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    RE: Beef tallow 2007/12/05 13:10:43 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by 007bond-jb

    Maybe yall wasen't paying attention I posted this some time back: burgers with beef Tallow fries
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wo8YNPVz33w

    & they was real damm good




    Damn, that looked like a good mess of french fries.

    I'm old enough to remember when McDonald's fries actually tasted great. Not like today when all fast food french fries are almost totally taste-free.

    I ate at Five Guys Hamburgers&Fries for the first time yesterday, with high hopes that their fries would be great since they are fresh cut, not frozen. They were passable--a cut above frozen fries and similar to the old McDonald's fries in that they retained some of the potato skin on them. But, being fried in peanut oil, devoid of even a drop of beff tallow, they could not hold a candle to beef tallow fried fires.

    007bond-jb: Would you like to get in the tallow-fried french fries market? I'd sure buy some and not even worry about the cholesterol.

    #16
    Sundancer7
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    RE: Beef tallow 2007/12/05 14:03:42 (permalink)
    JB: Fries looked really good. I checked with the only supermarket in Knoxville that actually cuts their meat and beef tallow or kidney suet is not available. They said they could not even order it.

    If suet was available, I would do as you did and render it down for frying.

    Paul E. Smith
    Knoxville, TN
    #17
    007bond-jb
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    RE: Beef tallow 2007/12/05 15:19:32 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by Sundancer7

    JB: Fries looked really good. I checked with the only supermarket in Knoxville that actually cuts their meat and beef tallow or kidney suet is not available. They said they could not even order it.

    If suet was available, I would do as you did and render it down for frying.

    Paul E. Smith
    Knoxville, TN


    I was readin a Russian recipe today that called for kidney suet in a stew, things like that are avalible overseas.
    I had purchased a whole untrimmed cyro-pac briskit & cut the point from the flat. I smoked the flat a few days before for another meal & removed & rendered the of the fat from the point before grinding into burger meat.
    The briskit burgers were super good & the fries... I thought I had stepped back in time 25 years, They tasted marvalous like what I rember as a younger JB from Mickey Dees. I also read that they did cut the tallow with another oil, what kind? They didn't say, They also didn't say it was a 50x50 blend. I think I read that at a hamburger todays site some time ago...

    They a Greek restaurant not far from my house that has fries that taste like the ones I made, I asked the manager how come? He replied "Uh we change the oil in our frier ever day" I don't belive that crap Boy. I belive that they got a connection for buying beef tallow

    JB

    #18
    tmiles
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    RE: Beef tallow 2011/11/19 04:48:25 (permalink)
    I read recently that the best "french" fries in Belgium are from a special kind of spud, double fried in beef tallow. Some foodies (roadfooders?) travel around to seek out the best places. Like here, a lot of the fries have been improved to use cheaper, better looking potatoes, cooked in healthier fats.
     
    Just a day or two ago in Wall Street Journal I was reading about a famous new restaurant that cooks their fried chicken in a mixture of animal fat (no bear fat, although for what this place charges they can afford to), in iron skillets.
     
    There seems to be a trend to eat the unhealthy stuff, now and then, just for the special flavor. 
    #19
    Louis
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    RE: Beef tallow 2011/11/19 08:35:38 (permalink)
    In Henderson, KY there used to be a little hamburger joint (part of a small chain that still exists in western Kentucky) called Ferrell's.  The hamburgers were unlike anything I've had before or since.  The secret, I understood, was not only in the flavor which the grill imparted to the meat but the fact that they were cooked with beef tallow that made them so delicious.  In 1972 or thereabouts, the government stepped in and said restaurants couldn't serve their customers hamburgers prepared with beef tallow (or at least not the way they were doing it).  The hamburgers were still good after that, but they were a very distant shadow or their former heavenly flavor.  The only thing that the hamburgers had going for them from that point forward until they closed the Henderson operation and demolished the building for a church parking lot in the mid-1990s was the unique flavor that the grill gave the meat.  If you go to any of the three remaining Ferrell's restaurants in the western KY region (Madisonville, Hopkinsville, Cadiz), the hamburgers are (in my opinion) rather blah.  They're something to eat, but nothing to look forward to.
     
    #20
    lleechef
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    RE: Beef tallow 2011/11/19 17:32:31 (permalink)
    It very well be true that they are now using beef tallow in Belgium for their frites.  But when I lived on the French/Belgian border the frites were fried in lard or a combination of lard and oil.  And yes, the potatoes are different from US potatoes.  At any rate, they were absolutely the BEST fries I ever ate in my life.
    #21
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