British ice cream

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food10
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2006/01/09 14:13:35 (permalink)

British ice cream

In Britain how traditional British ice cream differs from american style ice cream in general also what is the name of that ice creamcalled in America?
#1

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    Tedbear
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    RE: British ice cream 2006/01/09 14:16:29 (permalink)

    Hmmm...Two nations, separated by language.
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    BuddyRoadhouse
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    RE: British ice cream 2006/01/09 16:12:04 (permalink)
    This doesn't necessarily apply to the question (or maybe it does, see above comment), but in Ireland they sell Good Humor ice cream and confections under the name HB for Heart Beat. Almost every little shop that sold them had a large light up plastic swirly cone sitting outside its front door. The product seemed to be a cut above the typical Good Humor product sold here in the States.
    #3
    corabeth
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    RE: British ice cream 2006/03/12 15:50:27 (permalink)
    When my husband and I were in England several years ago we had vanilla ice cream cones at a lovely city park in Statford on Avon. It was soooo rich and creamy. I've never tasted any ice cream in the US that comes close to it. It must have been made with heavy cream only. Also, I don't thing there is such a thing as 2% milk, much less skim milk in England. We had a breakfast buffet at our hotel and they had heavy, heavy cream(it almost would not pour out of the pitcher) and whole milk which was like half and half.
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    BT
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    RE: British ice cream 2006/03/12 17:16:15 (permalink)
    I don't think there exists "American style ice cream" any more and, as a matter of fact, the traditional American brands are increasingly being bought by multinational, often European corporate giants like Switzerland's Nestle. There's no comparison between the cheapest stuff you might get in a supermarket (or the huge array of nofat/lowfat/sugar free products now available) and the best quality ice creams sold here--not to mention gelato which, at least in SF, is as available as the "regular" stuff. I normally buy the second tier ice cream: Blue Bell, Dreyer's (owned by Nestle), Blue Bunny--that sort of thing which runs about $5.99 for the "new half gallons" (which are less than a half gallon except for Blue Bell) but often obtainable on sale for $2.50-$3.00. I'd consider the top tier non-gelato brands to be the Haagen-Dazs, Ben and Jerry's and Starbuck's all of which seem to run almost twice the price of Blue Bell and, IMHO, are not worth it. If I want to really indulge, I go get some gelato and it's hard to imagine how British ice cream or any ice cream could be more "creamy" than a good gelato, here or in Italy. Partly it's a function of the butterfat, but also it's a function of how much air is whipped into the ice cream as it freezes--less air means denser, creamier ice cream.
    #5
    BT
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    RE: British ice cream 2006/03/12 17:27:24 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by corabeth

    We had a breakfast buffet at our hotel and they had heavy, heavy cream(it almost would not pour out of the pitcher) and whole milk which was like half and half.


    You sure you didn't have "clotted cream" which is often served in Britain and is similar to "creme fraiche" or the hispanic "crema fresca"--although not sour like sour cream, it's similar in consistency and won't pour. If you like it you should be able to get it here in gourmet or, for the Hispanic version, Mexican groceries.

    Also, when I first moved to SF in the early 80's, local dairy Berkeley Farms made a product called "extra rich milk" which was half/half-like and it was not only used by many coffee shops as the creamer of choice but also sold in most supermarkets. In recent years I haven't seen it, possibly because BF was bought out by corporate giant Dean Foods.
    #6
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