The most memorable local eateries along the highways and back roads of America
Sign In | Register for Free!
Restaurants Recipes Forums EatingTours Merchandise FAQ Maps Insider
Forum Themes:
Welcome !

 Brooklyn

Change Page: < 12 | Showing page 2 of 2, messages 31 to 48 of 48
Author Message
Ciaoman

  • Total Posts: 375
  • Joined: 5/2/2006
  • Location: Killingworth, CT
RE: Brooklyn Fri, 05/5/06 6:06 PM (permalink)
Lot's of memories. I was born in '47 at Brooklyn Hospital and lived in what was called Williamsburg (Vernon Ave near Tomkins Ave) until 54 when we moved to the "country" (CT). Riding the Broadway El, eating Charlotte Russe at a German bakery on Graham Ave, buying Jewish appetizer-type foods at a tiny store on DeKalb, cakes at Ebingers, it goes on and on. I recall the candy store on the corner where egg creams ruled, and the little bagel shop (where bagels were, by today's behemoth standards, tiny). We were deprived I guess--there was no such thing as a sun dried tomato bagel. Wonder how we survived? Does anyone remember when Bickfords was an excellent cafeteria in NYC? What about Chock Full 'a Nuts?

Chinese food every Sunday! Funny what you remember.

Whenever I see the word "neighborhood," I think of the area where we lived. All sorts of folks, all getting along. Perhaps the fog of reminiscence is clouding the truth a bit, but I do have overwhelmingly favorable memories of that place. Still go back on occasion but, a lot has changed. (Great topic!)
 
#31
    albinoni

    • Total Posts: 149
    • Joined: 7/21/2003
    • Location: Plainfield, NJ
    RE: Brooklyn Sat, 05/6/06 8:57 PM (permalink)
    For the first few years we lived in Brooklyn, Church Avenue between Ocean Avenue and Coney Island Avenue still had a lot of the old businesses. We were told about Dubin's Bakery, and started going there every Sunday for coffeecakes and pastry, as well as rye bread and Jewish corn bread (something worth a whole separate topic) that was the best to be found anywhere. I remember they had a double pecan ring that was filled with whipped cream--it was unbelievable. The place was staffed with little old ladies behind the counter who loved to joke with the customers. Then one day, with no warning, they closed down.

    Charlie
     
    #32
      Ciaoman

      • Total Posts: 375
      • Joined: 5/2/2006
      • Location: Killingworth, CT
      RE: Brooklyn Sat, 05/6/06 9:08 PM (permalink)
      Charlie, I remember the bakeries in Brooklyn very well--seems like every neighborhood had a couple. Absolutely great stuff. Ebingers had a special cake that had a fantastic chocolate butter cream icing covered with slivered almonds.

      Your comments about Dubins reminded me about the movie "Fatso" with Dom DeLuise. In it, there's a scene where he goes to a bakery for a bunch of stuff--those are the kinds of bakeries that are virtually impossible to find anymore. Cakes, tortes, pies, real Danish...just thinking about it raises my glucose level.
       
      #33
        cornfed

        • Total Posts: 344
        • Joined: 5/14/2005
        • Location: atlanta, GA
        RE: Brooklyn Sat, 05/6/06 10:10 PM (permalink)
        Ostrovitsky's on Ave. J amd Coney Island Ave. is still a very good bakery. Great cheese danishes and marble pound cake. Rude counterhelp, though.
         
        #34
          MacTAC

          • Total Posts: 425
          • Joined: 11/19/2004
          • Location: Long Island, NY
          RE: Brooklyn Sat, 05/6/06 11:31 PM (permalink)
          quote:
          Originally posted by Ciaoman

          Does anyone remember when Bickfords was an excellent cafeteria in NYC?

          I remember the name but never ate there to my knowledge. I remember when they came out with a version called Bick's. Didn't last too long, I don't think. Some interesting info in the short Wikipedia link below.

          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bickford's
           
          #35
            albinoni

            • Total Posts: 149
            • Joined: 7/21/2003
            • Location: Plainfield, NJ
            RE: Brooklyn Sun, 05/7/06 8:57 PM (permalink)
            quote:
            Originally posted by Ciaoman

            Charlie, I remember the bakeries in Brooklyn very well--seems like every neighborhood had a couple. Absolutely great stuff. Ebingers had a special cake that had a fantastic chocolate butter cream icing covered with slivered almonds.

            Your comments about Dubins reminded me about the movie "Fatso" with Dom DeLuise. In it, there's a scene where he goes to a bakery for a bunch of stuff--those are the kinds of bakeries that are virtually impossible to find anymore. Cakes, tortes, pies, real Danish...just thinking about it raises my glucose level.


            Ebinger's gets mentioned a lot here and among old time Brooklynites. I never had the chance to experience any of their legendary cakes.

            The old-time Brooklyn Jewish bakery had an aroma that no other bakery had--a very heavy sweet smell that hit you like a brick when you walked through the door. Italian bakeries have a completely different aroma. I think it might have been almond paste. Until recently we had a Jewish bakery here in my town that had been here forever, was probably once great but got tired and apathetic. That aroma was missing, and the product reflected that.

            Charlie
             
            #36
              Ciaoman

              • Total Posts: 375
              • Joined: 5/2/2006
              • Location: Killingworth, CT
              RE: Brooklyn Mon, 05/8/06 10:02 AM (permalink)
              Speaking of Jewish bakeries, the thing that really sticks out in my memory were the breads...real crusty rye that stood up to a sandwich, hard rolls that were crusty and light (not the so-called bulkie rolls that are like round white bread. Yuck). I also fondly remember the onion rolls. A roast beef sandwich on an onion roll with horseradish!

              I know of a town in my area that also had a Jewish backery for many years that closed down. It was famouse for what they called "Dark Russian Rye"--a huge oblong loaf covered with special seeds that they imported. Persons would come from surrounding states to buy this bread. With the addition of sweet butter, it was a meal!
               
              #37
                albinoni

                • Total Posts: 149
                • Joined: 7/21/2003
                • Location: Plainfield, NJ
                RE: Brooklyn Tue, 05/9/06 2:21 PM (permalink)
                quote:
                Originally posted by Ciaoman

                Speaking of Jewish bakeries, the thing that really sticks out in my memory were the breads...real crusty rye that stood up to a sandwich, hard rolls that were crusty and light (not the so-called bulkie rolls that are like round white bread. Yuck). I also fondly remember the onion rolls. A roast beef sandwich on an onion roll with horseradish!

                I know of a town in my area that also had a Jewish backery for many years that closed down. It was famouse for what they called "Dark Russian Rye"--a huge oblong loaf covered with special seeds that they imported. Persons would come from surrounding states to buy this bread. With the addition of sweet butter, it was a meal!


                Sounds like it could be the Russian Pumpernickle that is almost impossible to find now. It was a very dark loaf, with or without seeds, quite dense, with a deep rich, almost chocolaty flavor.
                 
                #38
                  The Travelin Man

                  • Total Posts: 3698
                  • Joined: 3/25/2003
                  • Location: Central FL
                  RE: Brooklyn Sat, 05/13/06 7:51 PM (permalink)
                  Seems like with the plethora of Brooklyn-ites and natives, this might as well be as good a place to ask this question as any.

                  I want to walk across the Brooklyn Bridge. I would like to park the car near Grimaldi's, take the subway to Manhattan and then walk back across from Manhattan to Brooklyn, have lunch at Grimaldi's and then the Brooklyn Ice Cream Factory.

                  I am pretty sure that this is feasible, but was wondering if anyone could offer the specifics (get on the subway at the corner of X and Y -- take it to XX station -- the entrance to the bridge will be on the....) to support this endeavor. I have been told that it takes about 1/2 hour to walk the bridge, but if anyone has experience actually pulling off a stunt like this, I would like to have an idea on what you think the complete time it would take -- as on the evening of the afternoon for which I have this planned, I need to work -- so, I do need to allot enough time to do this.

                  Thanks,
                  Steve
                   
                  #39
                    albinoni

                    • Total Posts: 149
                    • Joined: 7/21/2003
                    • Location: Plainfield, NJ
                    RE: Brooklyn Mon, 05/15/06 10:58 AM (permalink)
                    quote:
                    Originally posted by stevekoe

                    Seems like with the plethora of Brooklyn-ites and natives, this might as well be as good a place to ask this question as any.

                    I want to walk across the Brooklyn Bridge. I would like to park the car near Grimaldi's, take the subway to Manhattan and then walk back across from Manhattan to Brooklyn, have lunch at Grimaldi's and then the Brooklyn Ice Cream Factory.

                    I am pretty sure that this is feasible, but was wondering if anyone could offer the specifics (get on the subway at the corner of X and Y -- take it to XX station -- the entrance to the bridge will be on the....) to support this endeavor. I have been told that it takes about 1/2 hour to walk the bridge, but if anyone has experience actually pulling off a stunt like this, I would like to have an idea on what you think the complete time it would take -- as on the evening of the afternoon for which I have this planned, I need to work -- so, I do need to allot enough time to do this.

                    Thanks,
                    Steve


                    It is feasable, but you'll need time as there are no subway stops in the immediate area of Grimadi's.

                    The nearest stop is High Street/Brooklyn Bridge on the A and C line. One entrance to the station is on Cadman Plaza West, which is an extension of Fulton Street (in fact, it used to be called Fulton Street) which is where Grimaldi's and Ice Cream Factory are located. It is about 5-10 minute walk. Take either the A or C train one stop to the Broadway/Nassau stop in Manhattan, walk over to Park Row (where J&R computers and electronics is located), and pick up the Brooklyn Bridge walkway opposite City Hall.

                    How much time this will take depends on how fast you walk. 1/2 hour is about right for normal pace, but the views are very arresting and will slow you down.

                    Charlie
                     
                    #40
                      The Travelin Man

                      • Total Posts: 3698
                      • Joined: 3/25/2003
                      • Location: Central FL
                      RE: Brooklyn Wed, 05/17/06 12:06 AM (permalink)
                      Thanks! I am going to give this a shot, weather permitting tomorrow. Hopefully, I will have some good photos to share when I get done!
                       
                      #41
                        i95

                        • Total Posts: 2500
                        • Joined: 7/14/2003
                        • Location: Sin City, VA
                        RE: Brooklyn Wed, 11/11/09 3:06 PM (permalink)
                        BrooklynBill
                         

                        Dined at Lundy’s...

                         
                         

                         

                        Nice paean to Brooklyn's former Lundy's by bon vivant Arthur Schwartz

                        in his latest e-mail / newsletter reprinted here:

                         
                         
                        LUNDY’S ON MY MIND – NOW ON MY WALL
                         
                        A few weeks ago, for no good reason other than I was already on ebay.com checking out a piece of pottery I was bidding on, I put the word "Lundy’s" into the search line. Sometimes a fork or spoon comes up from the favorite restaurant of my youth. I have a couple of pieces of Lundy’s flatware now, but you can always fit another fork, spoon or knife into your life. There were no Lundy’s utensils for sale, but there was the 1934 sea foam green and orange mosaic plaque that hung outside the front door on Emmons Ave. and beside the clam bar entrance on Ocean Ave. (There were two.) The plaque says F.W.I.L. on a diagonal band (standing for Frederick William Irving Lundy let’s call him the main and infamous Lundy) as well as Lundy Bros. horizontally. I have a copy of "Lundy's: Reminiscences and Recipes from Brooklyn's Legendary Restaurant" by Robert Cronfield, and the plaque is pictured in it. You can also read the whole story about Lundy’s in "Arthur Schwartz’s New York City Food." I have a facsimile recipe for the famous biscuits there, too.
                         
                        I knew about this plaque because, about 10 years ago, when I was looking for old photos of Lundy’s for my book "NYC Food," I discovered Brian Merlis, who is THE collector and dealer in Brooklyn memorabilia, as well as a genuine Brooklyn historian. He’s published numerous books filled with his vintage photographs, each on a different Brooklyn neighborhood. Back then, he showed me the Lundy’s plaque – he calls it an escutcheon – which he had recently bought. I have had it on my mind ever since, and when I saw it on ebay at a Buy It Now price I could not afford, I called Brian immediately. We negotiated and it’s mine now.
                         
                        Before it was Brian’s, it was owned by Ed Gil, the son of the founder of Goya Foods. Before that, it must have been hanging on the Lundy’s building, which is an official New York City landmark. The restaurant closed in 1977, after a scandalous episode in which involved F.W.I.L. snipping at cops from a second-story window. The plaque must have been removed soon after.
                         
                        By the way, the Lundy’s building, in what the New York City Landmarks Commission calls Spanish Mission style, now houses, among some other smaller businesses, including a Turkish coffee house, Cherry Hill, an upscale Russian market with imported groceries, every meat and fish known in the old Soviet empire, and a galaxy of prepared foods which, strangely, you cannot eat on the premises, even though there is a café.
                        Brian Merlis had the forethought to have our picture taken when he handed the sign over to me at his home in Freeport, Long Island, and the photo ran, along with a brief story about the purchase, in the Brooklyn Daily Eagle, where Brooklyn borough president Marty Markowitz read about it. He sent me a beautiful letter congratulating me on the purchase, thrilled that it is still in Brooklyn. I am thrilled that it will hang in my dining room, when we can figure out how to do that without the wall falling down. It is very heavy, a shield banded with bronze and filled with cement.
                         
                        Now go check out www.thecitycook.com. It’s a great web site even without me.


                         
                         
                        #42
                          NYPIzzaNut

                          • Total Posts: 3127
                          • Joined: 3/8/2008
                          • Location: Sardinia, OH
                          Re:Brooklyn Wed, 11/11/09 3:43 PM (permalink)
                          NYNM


                          Reading about candy on another part of Roadfood, I noticed how many people mentioned Brooklyn. I have once read that 1 in 6 people ion the US can trace their roots to Brookln.

                          So I ask:

                          How many of you have ever lived in Brooklyn, or come from families from Brooklyn?

                          Me: 1948 (birth) - 1975. Flatlands : Ave. M & E. 28 St.

                          When my grandparents on my dad's side came over from Italy in 1902 they lived first in Brooklyn with relatives until they got married and settled and started a family.  They moved to Yonkers where most of our family lived for decades.

                          My wife and most of her family also lived in Brooklyn originally and then moved to Queens and then to the middle Long Island area.
                          <message edited by NYPIzzaNut on Wed, 11/11/09 3:45 PM>
                           
                          #43
                            mar52

                            • Total Posts: 7598
                            • Joined: 4/17/2005
                            • Location: Marina del Rey, CA
                            RE: Brooklyn Wed, 11/11/09 4:21 PM (permalink)
                            My mother is from Brooklyn but escaped when she was eight.
                             
                            #44
                              Ajastoy

                              • Total Posts: 1
                              • Joined: 7/4/2011
                              • Location: Long Island, NY
                              RE: Brooklyn Mon, 07/4/11 1:11 PM (permalink)
                              This might be a post 5 years to late, but I just found this now in a search. I've done various internet searchs over the past 10 yrs or so,,, and I think this is only the 2nd or so reference I  found for Dubin's Bakery. My grandfather started Dubin's back in the 30's,, and my Dad and Uncle ran it til they had to close down that one sorry day back in 1981 for Passover. They never reopened.  The economics of the times then were just so bad. We had 2 stores then. The main store on Church Ave, and it did all the baking for that location and the one we had on Kings Highway between E. 19th St and Ocean Avenue. As my dad put it back then, the Church avenue store sold more cake than bread products, and the Kings Highway store sold more bread than cake.  It was becoming easier and more economically feasible for people back then to just buy from a supermarket (before they all started having their own bakeries sprout up!).
                               
                              Still, its nice to find kind words being said in memory of Dubin's. In the 30 years that have passed, I still havent found 1 single bakery that can bake up some of the goodies the way I will always remember them to be.  I dont even know what happened to the salesladies that we had working for us (Barry Manilow's Aunt was one of the salesladies),, I know the majority of them must have passed away. But I have the fond memories of them,,, helping the bakers in the back with doing the cookies,,,, the breads (I dont think I can remember how to braid a challah anymore :( ), decorating cakes and personalizing them.
                               
                              It is nice to see that there are bakeries popping up, perhaps not like Dubin's,,, but nevertheless, baking their tasty treats to share with the world!
                               
                              Nancy
                               
                              PS if there is anyone out there that know's where to get a really good schmatonka,,, I would forever be in your debt! LOL!
                               
                              #45
                                Sundancer7

                                RE: Brooklyn Mon, 07/4/11 6:33 PM (permalink)
                                I have always wanted to visit Brooklyn for their very super ethnic food.  Particually the Russian, Itailian, greek and other great places.  If I get the chance, Iwanago and I wil take a few days off and fly to NYC where we can enjoy this wonderful place.
                                 
                                Paul E. Smith
                                Knoxville, TN
                                 
                                #46
                                  junkliss

                                  • Total Posts: 1
                                  • Joined: 3/26/2012
                                  • Location: Marlboro, NJ
                                  RE: Brooklyn Mon, 03/26/12 10:05 PM (permalink)
                                  Wow.
                                  I grew up on E21 between Church and Caton (having left Brooklyn in 1976). I must have shopped at Dubins (for my parents) from age 10 to 22 ! I can remember a man, probably your grandfather, sitting in his little office opposite the glass cases. What I would give for one of his almond horns ! My uncle (Israel Liss) was a fancy cake baker. Most of the time he worked for Jay Dees (Utica ave ?), but sometimes worked for Dubins - do you remember him ? You mentioned Barry Manilow. He lived in my apartment house until he started to play for Bette Midler. His mother, Edna Murphy (yea, check out her name) - lived in my apartment house too. I don't remember Edna or Barry ever really talking about Dubins, although Edna frequented the Turkey Bar on Church ave !
                                  Jonathan (junkliss@optonline.net)
                                   
                                  Ajastoy


                                  This might be a post 5 years to late, but I just found this now in a search. I've done various internet searchs over the past 10 yrs or so,,, and I think this is only the 2nd or so reference I  found for Dubin's Bakery. My grandfather started Dubin's back in the 30's,, and my Dad and Uncle ran it til they had to close down that one sorry day back in 1981 for Passover. They never reopened.  The economics of the times then were just so bad. We had 2 stores then. The main store on Church Ave, and it did all the baking for that location and the one we had on Kings Highway between E. 19th St and Ocean Avenue. As my dad put it back then, the Church avenue store sold more cake than bread products, and the Kings Highway store sold more bread than cake.  It was becoming easier and more economically feasible for people back then to just buy from a supermarket (before they all started having their own bakeries sprout up!).

                                  Still, its nice to find kind words being said in memory of Dubin's. In the 30 years that have passed, I still havent found 1 single bakery that can bake up some of the goodies the way I will always remember them to be.  I dont even know what happened to the salesladies that we had working for us (Barry Manilow's Aunt was one of the salesladies),, I know the majority of them must have passed away. But I have the fond memories of them,,, helping the bakers in the back with doing the cookies,,,, the breads (I dont think I can remember how to braid a challah anymore :( ), decorating cakes and personalizing them.

                                  It is nice to see that there are bakeries popping up, perhaps not like Dubin's,,, but nevertheless, baking their tasty treats to share with the world!

                                  Nancy

                                  PS if there is anyone out there that know's where to get a really good schmatonka,,, I would forever be in your debt! LOL!


                                   
                                  #47
                                    Foodbme

                                    • Total Posts: 9548
                                    • Joined: 9/1/2006
                                    • Location: Gilbert, AZ
                                    RE: Brooklyn Tue, 03/27/12 3:15 AM (permalink)
                                    What wonderful stories you folks tell. I worked in Manhatten for 6 years but never had the opportunity to spend any time in the Boroughs, but worked with many of the people who lived there. Always had a secret yearning to go home with some of them just for the experience of having spent time in their places. I was too busy commuting 5 hours a day in and out of the Port Authority bus terminal ( 2 1/2 hours one way on a bus) then 8 hours of work to boot to spend time in the boroughs. My loss!
                                    I also worked in North Bergen a number of years and some of my co-workers had moved to NJ from the Boroughs and told wonderful stories too. They often went "Home" on weekends and would bring me wonderful tasting goodies!
                                     
                                    #48
                                      Online Bookmarks Sharing: Share/Bookmark
                                      Change Page: < 12 | Showing page 2 of 2, messages 31 to 48 of 48

                                      Jump to:

                                      Current active users

                                      There are 0 members and 1 guests.

                                      Icon Legend and Permission

                                      • New Messages
                                      • No New Messages
                                      • Hot Topic w/ New Messages
                                      • Hot Topic w/o New Messages
                                      • Locked w/ New Messages
                                      • Locked w/o New Messages
                                      • Read Message
                                      • Post New Thread
                                      • Reply to message
                                      • Post New Poll
                                      • Submit Vote
                                      • Post reward post
                                      • Delete my own posts
                                      • Delete my own threads
                                      • Rate post

                                      2000-2014 ASPPlayground.NET Forum Version 3.9
                                      What is Roadfood?  |   Privacy Policy  |   Contact Roadfood.com   Copyright 2011 - Roadfood.com