Brooklyn

Page: 12 > Showing page 1 of 2
Author
NYNM
Filet Mignon
  • Total Posts : 3053
  • Joined: 2005/06/16 23:00:00
  • Location: New York, NY/Santa Fe, NM
  • Status: offline
2006/04/29 07:39:35 (permalink)

Brooklyn

Reading about candy on another part of Roadfood, I noticed how many people mentioned Brooklyn. I have once read that 1 in 6 people ion the US can trace their roots to Brookln.

So I ask:

How many of you have ever lived in Brooklyn, or come from families from Brooklyn?

Me: 1948 (birth) - 1975. Flatlands : Ave. M & E. 28 St.
#1

47 Replies Related Threads

    wanderingjew
    Sirloin
    • Total Posts : 7761
    • Joined: 2001/01/18 18:49:00
    • Location: East Greenwich/ Warwick, RI
    • Status: offline
    RE: Brooklyn 2006/04/29 08:43:15 (permalink)
    Both Parents were born in Brooklyn.
    I lived @ East 10th St and Ave J from 1988-1990
    #2
    NYNM
    Filet Mignon
    • Total Posts : 3053
    • Joined: 2005/06/16 23:00:00
    • Location: New York, NY/Santa Fe, NM
    • Status: offline
    RE: Brooklyn 2006/04/29 08:57:58 (permalink)
    Also, my mother was born in Red Hook. Bklyn. Coffey St & Van Brunt.
    #3
    ken8038
    Double Chili Cheeseburger
    • Total Posts : 1595
    • Joined: 2004/02/04 20:13:00
    • Location: scotch plains, NJ
    • Status: offline
    RE: Brooklyn 2006/04/29 09:13:28 (permalink)
    Bay Ridge section here. b.1948. NJ since 1985. Parents: Dad raised in the German enclave of Ridgewood (on the Brooklyn/Queens border), Mom born in Little Italy, grew up in the same house as me in Bay Ridge.

    PS to NYNM-- Red Hook is the latest hot gentrification area in NYC.
    #4
    NYNM
    Filet Mignon
    • Total Posts : 3053
    • Joined: 2005/06/16 23:00:00
    • Location: New York, NY/Santa Fe, NM
    • Status: offline
    RE: Brooklyn 2006/04/29 09:20:05 (permalink)
    Yes, I know about Red Hook - my grandmother sold their 3 floor building in the 1980's : two 2 bedroom corner units with store beneath for total $17,000. That's when the neighborhood was "bad". I'll bet she could make $1,700,000 now if we held out!

    Also, I forgot, I lived in Bay Ridge from 1972-5: 72 St & Colonial Rd.!
    #5
    Twinwillow
    Sirloin
    • Total Posts : 5068
    • Joined: 2006/04/15 23:17:00
    • Location: "Big D"
    • Status: offline
    RE: Brooklyn 2006/04/29 11:48:02 (permalink)
    I was born in Brooklyn in 1939. Lived at 70 Lenox road off Flatbush ave near Caton ave and Church ave. I rember eating "Charlotte Russe" out of cups on
    Flatbush ave as well as (red) candy apples and of course, egg creams and chocolate covered marshmallow cookies at "Walls" candy store.
    I remember "Garfields" cafeteria at Church and Flatbush. And the best Chinese food at the "upstairs" places. I remember going to the movies on Saturdays with 25 cents. That bought addmision to two full length movies, shorts and cartoons and sometimes a live show between features And still enough for two candy treats. Usally, a "Bonomo's" vanilla Turkish taffy bar and a box of "Juicyfriut"
    It was great growing up in Brooklyn.
    #6
    NYNM
    Filet Mignon
    • Total Posts : 3053
    • Joined: 2005/06/16 23:00:00
    • Location: New York, NY/Santa Fe, NM
    • Status: offline
    RE: Brooklyn 2006/04/29 13:08:22 (permalink)
    Ah, Charlotte Russe!
    I posted them on the "desserts" area last year and got no response; maybe you weren't a member then.
    Weren't they like sponge cakes with lots of whipped cream in cardboard "tubes" with scalloped ridges? I think some fruit like strawberry or cherry?
    #7
    Twinwillow
    Sirloin
    • Total Posts : 5068
    • Joined: 2006/04/15 23:17:00
    • Location: "Big D"
    • Status: offline
    RE: Brooklyn 2006/04/29 13:33:42 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by NYNM

    Ah, Charlotte Russe!
    I posted them on the "desserts" area last year and got no response; maybe you weren't a member then.
    Weren't they like sponge cakes with lots of whipped cream in cardboard "tubes" with scalloped ridges? I think some fruit like strawberry or cherry?

    You got it! And, as you ate, you would push it up from the bottom to expose more cream untll you got to the sponge cake.
    No, I was not a member then. But, I have been reading the Stern's books for about 20 years. Still have the original "Roadfood" in soft cover. I remember taking it along on our road travels and finding all the great places they visited.
    #8
    cornfed
    Cheeseburger
    • Total Posts : 344
    • Joined: 2005/05/14 17:39:00
    • Location: atlanta, GA
    • Status: offline
    RE: Brooklyn 2006/04/29 13:53:10 (permalink)
    Recently moved from Brooklyn. Lived in the Kensington and Greenpoint areas for 8 years. Already miss DiFara's, Polish meat markets, Bonnie's burgers, and Louie G's ices. Don't miss the subway, the depressing apartment buildings, the rotten fruit stands, and the lack of good supermarkets. These days, Brooklyn is either gentrified or close to dying, a thing of the past. But from my experience, Brooklyn has the smartest percentage of people in the country. Big love to the BKLYN.
    #9
    Tedbear
    Double Chili Cheeseburger
    • Total Posts : 1832
    • Joined: 2004/01/26 12:31:00
    • Location: Somerset, NJ
    • Status: offline
    RE: Brooklyn 2006/04/29 14:01:47 (permalink)
    I was born in Brooklyn in 1948, and we lived in Bay Ridge (81st St. & Third Avenue) until 1956, when we moved to NJ. My father was born in The Bronx, and grew up in Staten Island, and my mother was born in Greenwich Village. The only borough with which we have little connection is Queens.
    #10
    The Travelin Man
    Filet Mignon
    • Total Posts : 3744
    • Joined: 2003/03/25 02:02:00
    • Location: Central FL
    • Status: offline
    RE: Brooklyn 2006/04/29 16:43:36 (permalink)
    The paternal grandparents lived at 14th Street and Ave K (right across from Midwood High School) until the late 1990s. I think that the only time I "lived" in Brooklyn myself was in the womb.

    BUT, I will be at Brooklyn Tech High School next Saturday and plan on a stop at Juniors after my business for a slice of their famous cheesecake. If I play my cards right, I may also hit Grimaldi's for pie and hop across the street to the Brooklyn Ice Cream Factory for dessert. Don't know if I can pull off that trifecta, though.
    #11
    Twinwillow
    Sirloin
    • Total Posts : 5068
    • Joined: 2006/04/15 23:17:00
    • Location: "Big D"
    • Status: offline
    RE: Brooklyn 2006/04/29 19:03:25 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by stevekoe

    The paternal grandparents lived at 14th Street and Ave K (right across from Midwood High School) until the late 1990s. I think that the only time I "lived" in Brooklyn myself was in the womb.

    BUT, I will be at Brooklyn Tech High School next Saturday and plan on a stop at Juniors after my business for a slice of their famous cheesecake. If I play my cards right, I may also hit Grimaldi's for pie and hop across the street to the Brooklyn Ice Cream Factory for dessert. Don't know if I can pull off that trifecta, though.

    Junior's cheesecake is now sold in Dallas at Central Market and Deli-News.
    Just as good as the original Brooklyn deli.
    #12
    NYNM
    Filet Mignon
    • Total Posts : 3053
    • Joined: 2005/06/16 23:00:00
    • Location: New York, NY/Santa Fe, NM
    • Status: offline
    RE: Brooklyn 2006/04/30 15:45:25 (permalink)
    How can we mention Brooklyn without Ebinger's cakes?
    #13
    Twinwillow
    Sirloin
    • Total Posts : 5068
    • Joined: 2006/04/15 23:17:00
    • Location: "Big D"
    • Status: offline
    RE: Brooklyn 2006/04/30 16:29:16 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by NYNM

    How can we mention Brooklyn without Ebinger's cakes?

    Ahh, Ebingers. No one went to someones house without bringing an Ebinger's "Blackout cake", Right?
    #14
    Tedbear
    Double Chili Cheeseburger
    • Total Posts : 1832
    • Joined: 2004/01/26 12:31:00
    • Location: Somerset, NJ
    • Status: offline
    RE: Brooklyn 2006/04/30 17:36:32 (permalink)

    I seem to recall that my mother got her baked goods from Krug's, which I believe was a delivery operation similar to Dugan's. Does anyone remember Krug's in Brooklyn, circa 1950, or Dugan's in NJ, circa 1960? They operated in a somewhat similar fashion to milkmen, except that these bakery route salesmen would ring your bell in the afternoon, and would show you what was available that day. We loved the jellyrolls from Dugan's. It was really convenient!

    I can recall an advertising campaign that Dugan's ran on the radio in the late '50s or perhaps the early '60s. Their slogan in that ad was, "Thomas' promises, but Dugan's delivers!"

    While I don't recall any advertising for Krug's, I do recall that my brother looked forward to getting the next issue of their Peter Wheat comic book, which was only available from the Krug's delivery man. As a result of his nagging my mother for the next Peter Wheat comic book, it virtually guaranteed that she would buy something from the Krug's man when he visited.
    #15
    Twinwillow
    Sirloin
    • Total Posts : 5068
    • Joined: 2006/04/15 23:17:00
    • Location: "Big D"
    • Status: offline
    RE: Brooklyn 2006/04/30 17:53:40 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by Tedbear


    I seem to recall that my mother got her baked goods from Krug's, which I believe was a delivery operation similar to Dugan's. Does anyone remember Krug's in Brooklyn, circa 1950, or Dugan's in NJ, circa 1960? They operated in a somewhat similar fashion to milkmen, except that these bakery route salesmen would ring your bell in the afternoon, and would show you what was available that day. We loved the jellyrolls from Dugan's. It was really convenient!

    I can recall an advertising campaign that Dugan's ran on the radio in the late '50s or perhaps the early '60s. Their slogan in that ad was, "Thomas' promises, but Dugan's delivers!"
    I remember, either, Dugan's or Krug's delivering cake to my aunts house on Long Island back in the very late 40's or early 50's. Not sure which company it was. But, it was one of the above.

    While I don't recall any advertising for Krug's, I do recall that my brother looked forward to getting the next issue of their Peter Wheat comic book, which was only available from the Krug's delivery man. As a result of his nagging my mother for the next Peter Wheat comic book, it virtually guaranteed that she would buy something from the Krug's man when he visited.
    #16
    Tedbear
    Double Chili Cheeseburger
    • Total Posts : 1832
    • Joined: 2004/01/26 12:31:00
    • Location: Somerset, NJ
    • Status: offline
    RE: Brooklyn 2006/04/30 17:56:28 (permalink)
    Some other memories of Bay Ridge, circa 1955:

    My brother & I attended P.S. 185, located on 86th Street. The Principal of P.S. 185 was Mrs. Schindel, who was not exactly a barrel of laughs. The school was located directly across from The Kallman (sp?) Home, which was an orphanage. The kids from the Kallman Home were immediately recognizeable, as they did not dress very well in comparison with the other middle-class kids in the school, and the boys had haircuts that were sort of like "convict haircuts", unfortunately. Many of my friends attended St. Alselm's Elementary School, rather than P.S. 185.

    Further East on 86th Street, there was a little restaurant called The Green Tea Room. I think that the decor was green, rather than the tea. If you went another few blocks East on 86th Street, the neighborhood movie theater was The Dyker (what a name!), where I can remember seeing the 1950s era production of Robin Hood, and also some horse opera starring Rhonda Fleming. I was captivated by Rhonda's auburn hair and her beauty.

    On Third Avenue (around 84th or 85th Street) was a pet shop that we nicknamed "The Smelly Petshop". They sold dogs and clearly they did not clean out the cages very often. Just walking past the place was an assault to the olfactory senses. I can hardly imagine what it must have been like inside the place.

    The two supermarkets were Bohack's, which opened a new store on the corner of 81st & Third around 1955, and the A & P, which operated one of their typically smelly, wooden-floored stores on Third Avenue, probably between 79th & 80th Streets.

    The local Gin Mill was The Amber Tavern, located on Third Ave, between 80th & 81st. When the doors were open in the summer, the stench of stale beer was really strong. Next to The Amber was Kirsch's delicatessen, which always smelled very good.

    Does anyone else share these recollections of Bay Ridge in the early-middle 1950s?
    #17
    Twinwillow
    Sirloin
    • Total Posts : 5068
    • Joined: 2006/04/15 23:17:00
    • Location: "Big D"
    • Status: offline
    RE: Brooklyn 2006/04/30 17:57:13 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by Tedbear


    I seem to recall that my mother got her baked goods from Krug's, which I believe was a delivery operation similar to Dugan's. Does anyone remember Krug's in Brooklyn, circa 1950, or Dugan's in NJ, circa 1960? They operated in a somewhat similar fashion to milkmen, except that these bakery route salesmen would ring your bell in the afternoon, and would show you what was available that day. We loved the jellyrolls from Dugan's. It was really convenient!

    I can recall an advertising campaign that Dugan's ran on the radio in the late '50s or perhaps the early '60s. Their slogan in that ad was, "Thomas' promises, but Dugan's delivers!"

    While I don't recall any advertising for Krug's, I do recall that my brother looked forward to getting the next issue of their Peter Wheat comic book, which was only available from the Krug's delivery man. As a result of his nagging my mother for the next Peter Wheat comic book, it virtually guaranteed that she would buy something from the Krug's man when he visited.
    #18
    NYNM
    Filet Mignon
    • Total Posts : 3053
    • Joined: 2005/06/16 23:00:00
    • Location: New York, NY/Santa Fe, NM
    • Status: offline
    RE: Brooklyn 2006/04/30 19:37:20 (permalink)
    Waldbaums supermarkets!
    #19
    NYNM
    Filet Mignon
    • Total Posts : 3053
    • Joined: 2005/06/16 23:00:00
    • Location: New York, NY/Santa Fe, NM
    • Status: offline
    RE: Brooklyn 2006/04/30 19:44:47 (permalink)







    Does anyone else share these recollections of Bay Ridge in the early-middle 1950s?


    Bay Ridge, 1970's: Leske's Bakery. Old time tastes from when Bay Ridge was Scandanavian.
    #20
    John A
    Filet Mignon
    • Total Posts : 4295
    • Joined: 2006/01/27 07:19:00
    • Location: Daytona Beach, FL
    • Status: offline
    RE: Brooklyn 2006/05/01 08:03:16 (permalink)
    Hey, let's not forget the Bronx, Fordham Road, Bronx Zoo, NY Yankees, etc. I lived on East Tremont Avenue from 48-54.

    John
    #21
    Tedbear
    Double Chili Cheeseburger
    • Total Posts : 1832
    • Joined: 2004/01/26 12:31:00
    • Location: Somerset, NJ
    • Status: offline
    RE: Brooklyn 2006/05/01 10:58:08 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by John A

    Hey, let's not forget the Bronx, Fordham Road, Bronx Zoo, NY Yankees, etc. I lived on East Tremont Avenue from 48-54.

    John


    John--This was started as a Brooklyn thread. Why not start a Bronx thread if you want to explore connections with that borough?
    #22
    Pigiron
    Double Chili Cheeseburger
    • Total Posts : 1384
    • Joined: 2005/05/11 17:51:00
    • Location: Bergen County, NJ
    • Status: offline
    RE: Brooklyn 2006/05/01 11:13:54 (permalink)
    Both my parents were born in East New York, Brooklyn.

    I lived in Carroll Gardens, Brooklyn from ages 24-28 (1990-94)
    #23
    albinoni
    Cheeseburger
    • Total Posts : 149
    • Joined: 2003/07/21 21:01:00
    • Location: Plainfield, NJ
    • Status: offline
    RE: Brooklyn 2006/05/01 11:54:55 (permalink)
    We moved from the East Village to Brooklyn in 1977, just after I finished 4 years of school there. Moved out 20 years later. I still work there.

    We moved to Brooklyn after getting a late night phone call that a great apartment was about to be rented, and we should hustle if we wanted it. It was a super, and affordable, apartment in a hi-rise on Plaza Street East, just on the edge of Park Slope. A few young people lived there, but mostly old-timers who had lived in other nabes that had crumbled around them (mostly Jewish seniors who'd lived further east on Eastern Parkway, or Irish-Americans who'd lived in brownstones on nearby blocks that had yet to gentrify).

    Over the years we experienced just about everything that anyone could in an "emerging" neighborhood--lack of services, noise, drug dealing corner stores, bad shopping, crime and random violence, and a demoralizing sense of the future, followed by a real estate boomlet in the '80s where apartment buildings like ours converted from rental to co-op. With some doubts, we bought and became investors in our own space, and after a few years of paper wealth, watched the market collapse in the 90's, and stay in the dumpster for what seemed like an eternity. After a few years, crack was taking over, it was getting really depressing, everyone wanted out, but couldn't sell. When we moved, things were just beginning to get better, and you could sense it. Now, it's hot.

    I never experienced the Brooklyn of old that now seems to be fueling the nostalgia industy, although traces of it still existed: Gage and Tollner, the politicians whose names were familiar to everyone, the various clubs and organizations that catered to a different generation that had different social outlets, and an auction house (Columbia Galleries), located on a seedy block off Fulton Street, that disposed of estates of Brooklynites who lived their entire lives in the brownstones, rambling single family Victorians, and large apartment buildings and whose deaths, one by one, diminished the unique character of their neighorhoods. Nor will I ever experience the "new" Brooklyn that was gestating as I left--and although I love where I live now, I left with tears in my eyes, since I realized that after all that time, I had gone beyond just owning an apartment, and was giving up my identity as a Brooklynite.

    Charlie (now back to being a Jersey boy)
    #24
    John A
    Filet Mignon
    • Total Posts : 4295
    • Joined: 2006/01/27 07:19:00
    • Location: Daytona Beach, FL
    • Status: offline
    RE: Brooklyn 2006/05/02 07:18:05 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by Tedbear

    quote:
    Originally posted by John A

    Hey, let's not forget the Bronx, Fordham Road, Bronx Zoo, NY Yankees, etc. I lived on East Tremont Avenue from 48-54.

    John


    John--This was started as a Brooklyn thread. Why not start a Bronx thread if you want to explore connections with that borough?


    Hi TB,

    Just injecting a little humor, even I know the Bronx cannot compare to Brooklyn.

    John

    #25
    BrooklynBill
    Cheeseburger
    • Total Posts : 189
    • Joined: 2005/06/08 20:25:00
    • Location: Gardiner, NY
    • Status: offline
    RE: Brooklyn 2006/05/03 11:41:09 (permalink)
    I was born in The Brooklyn Hospital and lived in Brooklyn for almost all of my first 25 years.
    I played stickball on the street, played in Marine Park, Prospect Park and Bambino’s poolroom. Attended Brooklyn Prep and James Madison. Rode the Nostrand Ave. and the Flatbush Ave. trolleys, the Ave. R. Bus, and the IRT or the BMT to Manhattan. Frequented Ebbets Field, Sheepshead Bay, Coney Island and the pool at the St. George Hotel. Dined at Lundy’s, Dubrows (sp?), Nathan’s, Junior’s and Ho-Nan’s.
    My parents were both born and lived in Brooklyn. On my mother’s side we have a great-plus grandfather who fought in Brooklyn, in the Revolutionary War. He was a “Red Coat.” When he returned to Great Britain he presented a map of Brooklyn to his sons and told them exactly where to settle – they did.
    #26
    NYNM
    Filet Mignon
    • Total Posts : 3053
    • Joined: 2005/06/16 23:00:00
    • Location: New York, NY/Santa Fe, NM
    • Status: offline
    RE: Brooklyn 2006/05/03 22:59:33 (permalink)
    Brooklyn Bill: Sounds like we grew up in the same area. I do remember Dubrow's and Lundy's restaurants. Do you remember Jahn's restaurant and the "Kitchen Sink" Ice Cream dish?

    Also speaking of geography, what about the old Dutch farmhouses, many of which are still in the area?
    #27
    BrooklynBill
    Cheeseburger
    • Total Posts : 189
    • Joined: 2005/06/08 20:25:00
    • Location: Gardiner, NY
    • Status: offline
    RE: Brooklyn 2006/05/04 00:29:15 (permalink)
    quote:
    NYNM Posted - 05/03/2006 : 22:59:33

    Brooklyn Bill: Sounds like we grew up in the same area. I do remember Dubrow's and Lundy's restaurants. Do you remember Jahn's restaurant and the "Kitchen Sink" Ice Cream dish?

    Also speaking of geography, what about the old Dutch farmhouses, many of which are still in the area?


    NYNM -- I do remember Jahn's but I never went b/c my parents didn't believe in eating all that ice cream. I guess they were ahead of their time.

    There was an old Dutch farmhouse near Ave. T and Hearing St.(sp?) I remember another in the Mill Basen area. There was also an actual windmill near Marine Park. It was destroyed by fire in the late 1940's.
    There was also a large farmhouse on Ave. S or Ave. T near East 27th Street.

    I grew up on Batchelder St. near Ave. S.
    #28
    PaulBPool
    Cheeseburger
    • Total Posts : 278
    • Joined: 2002/02/20 08:56:00
    • Location: East Meadow, NY
    • Status: offline
    RE: Brooklyn 2006/05/04 15:35:32 (permalink)
    Long Island has been my home all of my life, including 5.5 years in Queens County when I was born, but, Mom's family lived on Liberty Avenue in Brooklyn for many years prior to moving to St. Albans Queens. So...guess I've got a bit of brooklynite in me as well!
    Several years ago, when I was working in sales, and Brooklyn was part of my territory, I remember stopping in at "Junior's" for a slice of cheesecake and an egg cream - and it was a real taste of the past!
    #29
    Tedbear
    Double Chili Cheeseburger
    • Total Posts : 1832
    • Joined: 2004/01/26 12:31:00
    • Location: Somerset, NJ
    • Status: offline
    RE: Brooklyn 2006/05/04 18:25:08 (permalink)
    Recently, in an odd moment with no major work assignment, I "googled" Bay Ridge, my old neighborhood. One of the websites that came up had information about the Russell Pedersen Memorial Playground. This immediately attracted my attention, since one of my playmates back in the early-middle 1950s was named Russell Pedersen. Imagine my shock to learn that Russell had died in the Viet Nam War, many years ago, and that this playground had been dedicated to his memory as a result of his dedication to the area's recreation program prior to his demise. This was a sobering moment indeed, to learn that one of my absolute closest friends from my childhood had passed away years ago in that ill-conceived foreign war. After we moved to NJ in 1956, I kept in touch with my friends for several years, and then, the inevitable lack of time for continued contact took its toll.

    That moment got me to thinking about Russell and my other little friends of that time. Russell's father was a waiter at Leone's Restaurant, which I believe was the original name of Mama Leone's, before it became a tourist haunt. My other friends included Bradley Coddington, who I believe, moved to Long Island somewhere around 1955, and also Gary Rodgers (or was it Rogers) and his brother "Bucky". Gary was a leader even at a young age, and his goal as a child, was to become a priest. I have frequently wondered if he achieved that goal. There was also Tommy Gallucci, who was a few years younger. I seem to recall that his father was a Stevedore, but that could be a faulty recollection on my part.

    Isn't is sad when we lose touch with our roots? And isn't it even sadder to learn that a childhood friend died without your being aware of it?

    #30
    Page: 12 > Showing page 1 of 2
    Jump to:
    © 2014 APG vNext Commercial Version 5.1