Build questions

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Mkinzi94
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2012/03/15 17:49:31 (permalink)

Build questions

Hello all:

I've finally found the right intersection of Time/Money to finalize things on my '83 KurbMaster.

So before I go past the point where I don't want to back up and do-over, I wanted some opinions on a few things - and knew this was the place to get those in abundance. Good ones even...

Like Apollo Trucks, I'm going with plywood attached to the aluminum floor. On top of that will be self-stick tile (for now - I'm going to see how it works before committing to something else). I never could reach Apollo to ask so, What do you folks think is the best way to attach plywood to the heavy aluminum floor? (And I won't be gluing at all - way too permanent for me!)

Also, what is the preferred wall cross-section? I.e., metal, then metal "studs" or tube, insulation, then plywood, then FRP/stainless?

And can you glue the foam insulation board directly to metal walls and ceiling?

I'll check my post count so I can get it up there to start posting pics. All of yours have been helpful and inspirational to me, so I hope to return the favor. One thing I'll be doing that will no doubt interest some is a "roof-raise"! I'm adding 16" to my too-short-for-me 72"-ish headroom. Stay tuned...
post edited by Mkinzi94 - 2012/03/15 17:51:12
#1

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    Mkinzi94
    Junior Burger
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    Re:Build questions 2012/03/15 18:06:44 (permalink)
    FYI - I referenced Apollo because it seems their blog of a Grumman build shows a guy screwing the ply down. Is it a simple countersunk self tapping screw, or more like a Tek screw?

    I'm ready to bolt down with 3/8" carriage bolts and lock nuts but it seems screws would be easier. Thoughts?
    #2
    Blissful Bite
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    Re:Build questions 2012/03/16 02:39:29 (permalink)
    I'd say don't put plywood and tiles on your floor...!  You'll have to seal the heck out of it repeatedly and if any water gets in, the plywood will warp and mess it all up.  Ask me how I know 
     
    A single sheet of vinyl might go well.  Many speak highly of diamond plate metal on the floor...pricey but bomb proof.
     
    If the existing floor isn't too bad, you could fill in dings with bondo, sand them smooth, and coat the whole thing with an expoxy floor coat like this: topsecretcoatings.com.  
     
    #3
    kingofcreams
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    Re:Build questions 2012/03/16 08:50:15 (permalink)
    My thoughts / experience with the floor. My ice cream truck originally had single piece vinyl flooring over plywood that was over the aluminum floor. I didn't like the look of the one piece so I went over it with the self adhesive tile and after my first season it just wasn't holding up at all and I had to replace a few in the middle of the first season. So I ended up pulling it all up down to the ply wood and installed the commercial grade VCT ( vinyl composite tile). Never had any issues after that. If the adhesive and tile are installed proper water would not get under them. I have hosed out the inside of my truck and never a problem. Those tiles are designed to have stripper solution dumped on them and are commonly used in housing authority houses and apartments with plywood subfloors. 
     
    I would install ferring strips on the floor first then go over those with the ply wood. This will allow you to use a good and small wood screw into the plywood that will counter sink itself into the ply. I did it like that to my truck when I extended the floor to the driver compartment and worked out great.
     
    On the walls IMO the easiest and cheapest way would again be ferring strips as studs if structure is needed. They sell a foam insulation adhesive that you could glue to the side of the rig or not.
     
    In my trailer build I glued insulation to the ceilings ply wood and used studs to hold it in place as it dried and held great until I installed the ply covering over it.
     
    I too have just a little over 6' in my trailer build and although i'd like to have more head room that would have been way too much work to do for me. I have already been at my build for a few months as it is.
     
    Good luck!
     
    Mkinzi94

    Hello all:

    I've finally found the right intersection of Time/Money to finalize things on my '83 KurbMaster.

    So before I go past the point where I don't want to back up and do-over, I wanted some opinions on a few things - and knew this was the place to get those in abundance. Good ones even...

    Like Apollo Trucks, I'm going with plywood attached to the aluminum floor. On top of that will be self-stick tile (for now - I'm going to see how it works before committing to something else). I never could reach Apollo to ask so, What do you folks think is the best way to attach plywood to the heavy aluminum floor? (And I won't be gluing at all - way too permanent for me!)

    Also, what is the preferred wall cross-section? I.e., metal, then metal "studs" or tube, insulation, then plywood, then FRP/stainless?

    And can you glue the foam insulation board directly to metal walls and ceiling?

    I'll check my post count so I can get it up there to start posting pics. All of yours have been helpful and inspirational to me, so I hope to return the favor. One thing I'll be doing that will no doubt interest some is a "roof-raise"! I'm adding 16" to my too-short-for-me 72"-ish headroom. Stay tuned...


    #4
    kingofcreams
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    Re:Build questions 2012/03/16 08:53:33 (permalink)
    Forgot to add that I am using the same VCT tile in my trailer buld as well
    #5
    Mkinzi94
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    Re:Build questions 2012/03/17 09:14:07 (permalink)
    Hi king -
     
    VCT is sounding like a good idea if I don't in fact go with sheet flooring.
    Seems it would be MUCH sturdier - I would hate to roll in a fridge and 1,100 lb Imperial range in for the first time and get a gouge!
    And the HD is fine with tiles, even though moisture penetration "might" occur at joints.
     
    But my biggest question remains - since I WILL be using plywood, what's the best way to hold it down?
    #6
    Bistro a go-go
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    Re:Build questions 2012/03/17 10:13:20 (permalink)
    construction adhesive and self tapping flat head stainless or some other hard screws for fastenal or like company. get a box, theyre cheaper.
    #7
    Bistro a go-go
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    Re:Build questions 2012/03/17 10:13:20 (permalink)
    construction adhesive and self tapping flat head stainless or some other hard screws for fastenal or like company. get a box, theyre cheaper.
    #8
    Blissful Bite
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    Re:Build questions 2012/03/18 01:05:04 (permalink)
    Hey just a gentle nudge here...but how to secure plywood to the floor should be a no-brainer.  It's no hassle for me to share a tip or ten, I enjoy it and applaud everyone who's leaping in with all they have...
     
    ...but if you're going to tackle something like this, it's going involve many many decisions about choosing the right construction materials and methods for best performance and cost...and you're going to need almost every tool out there.
     
    It's hard to come across like I'd want through a keyboard....  Take care.  Think about the value of your time and energy.   A self-built rig is not necessarily cheaper than a custom fabricated glimmering gem of a mobile kitchen.  If you've up for it and know for yourself its the BEST way to go, by all means go for it.  If your primary passion is to cook, find a way to hire out or partner with someone who can put it all together for you.  It's a long road between securing the floor and being up and running able to pay yourself.
     
    Someday soon I'll post my story and pics.  I made it, and I'm super proud of it, but damn it was challenging...and costly.
     
    All the best,
     
    Anil
    #9
    Mkinzi94
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    Re:Build questions 2012/03/18 18:20:24 (permalink)
    Anil:
     
    Gentle nudges appreciated...
    But saying something is a "no-brainer?!" Whoa - that tells me you have an idea that in all the world of truck fabrication, everybody uses ONE method of securing plywood?  Note that I didn't ask "How do I get the plywood to stay?" I asked, "What do you folks think is the best way to attach plywood...?"
     
    Anyway, asking for advice or suggestions or opinions should not be construed as being completely unequipped to tackle a difficult project.
    I could knock this thing out in relatively short order, but there is a lot of experience on this board that is a valuable resource, and I'd rather get some guidance on some things rather than rely on one or two opinions.  Some things ARE done well by committee...
     
    On every question I have asked, whether it's insulation, flooring, tie-downs, etc., I have ALREADY seen several ways that it's been done.  I just want more input as to WHY a certain method was chosen, perhaps over another.
     
    I think of Reese77's build (if I'm not mistaken).  Did some creative plumbing on his tanks, got a lot of questions and compliments, but didn't he decide to change it all up afterward?  It certainly wouldn't be fair to tell Reese he obviously should have never started at all.
     
    More later...
     
     
    #10
    mofood
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    Re:Build questions 2012/03/18 19:27:13 (permalink)
    Back to the plywood attachment :)
    My floor is attached with self drilling flathead screws that are coated. They are made to attach wood to metal. In my case, I used 1 7/16" length. I believe they were made by Tek.. I'll check if u want, have some left.

    Make sure to use polyurethane construction adhesive. Loctite PL is an example. The reason for this is that it remains flexible to allow a little expansion/contraction variation between materials.

    $.02
    #11
    Blissful Bite
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    Re:Build questions 2012/03/18 23:58:04 (permalink)
    I suppose that post was more about what I needed to say and less about what you needed to hear....
     
    If no one ever gave you a gut-check, it would mean no one cared.  It's a natural tendency for someone to say 'watch out for that hole I just stepped in'.  It doesn't mean they think you lack the ability to watch after yourself.
     
    Anyway, sorry to project and caretake...I'm sure you'll do fine.
     
     
    #12
    Mkinzi94
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    Re:Build questions 2012/03/19 23:26:49 (permalink)
    Thanks mofood:
     
    Very helpful info -that worked great!  Home Depot carried the Tek screws and the adhesive and that job is done!
     
    (I finally spoke with Norm at Apollo Carts out in British Columbia today, and that is the same way they put their floors down - Thanks Norm!)
     
     
     
    #13
    Mkinzi94
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    Re:Build questions 2012/03/19 23:42:57 (permalink)
    Anil:  No sweat - thanks for the gut check! 
     
    Looked your truck up and it's very cool - I'm guessing you converted a U-Haul truck?
    Good thing about those is how low the floor is compared to a P30 - seems good for service.
     
    I wanted to ask you about what appears to be your service window.  Another "food-trucker" (is there an official term?) here locally told me the other day that he wishes his service window was bigger.  Looked fine to me, but since it's similar to yours, what's your take on that?  Perfectly happy or do you wish it was larger?
     
    Cheers!
    #14
    Blissful Bite
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    Re:Build questions 2012/03/20 01:45:53 (permalink)
    Yeah, still feeling a bit sheepish about that.  Sometimes I type faster and later at night than I should...
     
    Thanks! I'm happy with how it's come together.  The capacity for scratch cooking in volume and commitment to great food are opening up a lot of opportunity.  I'm excited for this season.
     
    Yep, it was a 30ft U-haul, 20ft by 8ft inside the box plus the attic over the cab.  The low floor was definitely a consideration in picking this truck.  I also kept the ramp and roll-up door.  Just inside the roll-up I have a screen door which is a feature I really like.
     
    I like food trucker better than roach coacher!
     
    I'm relatively happy with the smallish service window.  It was a bargain from an RV salvage yard and very easy to install.  I set the bottom of it just above crotch height on the inside (to prevent confusion about what I'm selling) and that puts it at about 5ft 6in outside.  I have a SS shelf that quickly bolts on about a foot below the window so it's easy to reach out and set a plate down.  
     
    We're more geared to events and catering than curbside service and don't have a lot of condiments or self-service drinks and snacks.  Plus my main worktable is right behind that wall and I appreciate the shelter from wind and dust.  Yeah I'm content for now.  
     
    Cheers to you!  I wish you sunny skies and many deals and sales during your build.
    #15
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