Can you freeze sauerkraut ???

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wheregreggeats.com
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2008/10/06 09:14:43 (permalink)

Can you freeze sauerkraut ???

I'm talking authentic, home made sauerkraut, bought canned in a Bell jar from a vendor at the farmer's market.

We opened way too much, so it is either freeze it or go out for more Kielbasa.


An aside: After the first dinner, we ground up the meat, the potatoes, some sauerkraut, the leftover pirogies, some kapusta and a slice of rye bread and made what turned out to be a very good hash for the next morning!
#1

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    WarToad
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    RE: Can you freeze sauerkraut ??? 2008/10/06 09:27:18 (permalink)
    Th short answer is "You can, but you shouldn't."

    The very very very long answer is here:

    http://en.allexperts.com/q/Food-Safety-Issues-767/freezing-food.htm

    #2
    Foodosaurus
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    RE: Can you freeze sauerkraut ??? 2008/10/06 09:32:49 (permalink)
    Wow.
    #3
    wheregreggeats.com
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    RE: Can you freeze sauerkraut ??? 2008/10/06 09:41:37 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by WarToad

    Th short answer is "You can, but you shouldn't."

    The very very very long answer is here:

    http://en.allexperts.com/q/Food-Safety-Issues-767/freezing-food.htm



    That's quite a dissertation.

    One anomaly caught my eye. I thought authentic, home made sauerkraut is cabbage and salt ... no vinegar.

    #4
    WarToad
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    RE: Can you freeze sauerkraut ??? 2008/10/06 09:48:34 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by wheregreggeats.com


    One anomaly caught my eye. I thought authentic, home made sauerkraut is cabbage and salt ... no vinegar.


    Yep. And it would make me question the actual safety. In home versions - the salt quantity greatly inhibits pathogen bacteria. The freezing even more so.

    My question is, is the salt quantity so much, you end up with sauerkraut slush rather than frozen kraut?

    I do make homemade kraut. But I have always canned it, never even thought about freezing it.


    I see a mandatory food science experiment on the horizon for the greater good of the RoadFood community.
    #5
    shortchef
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    RE: Can you freeze sauerkraut ??? 2008/10/06 11:33:46 (permalink)
    When I lived in York County, PA, my editor had me interview a lady who made her own sauerkraut. She made it the traditional way, froze it in zip lock bags. She made me a hot dog with some of the sauerkraut and it had lost nothing in the freezing. It was delicious!
    #6
    pacman
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    RE: Can you freeze sauerkraut ??? 2008/10/06 11:40:01 (permalink)
    My parents have made sauerkraut many times over the years. It was both canned and frozen with no problems at all. My mother & wife have both frozen left over sauerkraut and reused it with no problems.

    As far as the article....Vinegar in Sauerkraut....not that I have ever seen.
    #7
    WarToad
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    RE: Can you freeze sauerkraut ??? 2008/10/06 11:43:32 (permalink)
    I wonder if vinegar in kraut is just a mass production speed method to approximating the naturally created acid from the slower salt fermentation method.
    #8
    wheregreggeats.com
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    RE: Can you freeze sauerkraut ??? 2008/10/06 12:15:27 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by WarToad

    I wonder if vinegar in kraut is just a mass production speed method to approximating the naturally created acid from the slower salt fermentation method.

    That is my guess.
    #9
    wheregreggeats.com
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    RE: Can you freeze sauerkraut ??? 2008/10/06 12:30:19 (permalink)
    From Wikipedia:

    " ... It has a long shelf-life and a distinctive sour flavor, both of which result from the lactic acid that forms when the bacteria ferment the sugars in the cabbage. It is therefore not to be confused with coleslaw, which receives its acidic taste from vinegar. "

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sauerkraut

    #10
    wheregreggeats.com
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    RE: Can you freeze sauerkraut ??? 2008/10/06 12:39:53 (permalink)
    And, what do the lawmakers say?

    Sec. 585.750 Sauerkraut - Definition; Adulteration by Thrips (CPG 7114.23)

    BACKGROUND:

    Food Inspection Decision (F.I.D.) 196, issued August 1925, defined sauerkraut. Since that time the definition, essentially unchanged through the revision that appeared in Service and Regulatory Announcements (S.R.A.) F.D. No. 2, Rev. 5, November 1936, has been used as a guide for officials in enforcing the Food and Drug Act of 1906 and the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act of 1938. The definition follows:

    Sauerkraut: The product, of characteristic acid flavor, obtained by the full fermentation, chiefly lactic, of properly prepared and shredded cabbage in the presence of not less than 2 percent nor more than 3 percent of salt. It contains, upon completion of the fermentation, not less than 1.5 percent of acid, expressed as lactic acid. Sauerkraut which has been rebrined in the process of canning or repacking, contains not less than 1 percent of acid, expressed as lactic acid.

    Shortly after enactment of the 1938 Act, sauerkraut was among the foods exempted from label declaration of ingredients requirement for labeling of nonstandardized foods. The exemption was based on the expectation that standards would soon be established. However, standards for this product were not established and on September 17, 1959, the exemption was terminated.

    POLICY:

    In the absence of a standard of identity, the term “sauerkraut” is considered the common or usual name for a product obtained by the lactic acid fermentation of cabbage in the presence of salt. Products which have not been fermented, but owe their acidity to added vinegar, acetic acid or other acidifiers are not entitled to the name sauerkraut. Ingredients of sauerkraut must be listed on the label by their common or usual name in descending order of predominance.

    REGULATORY ACTION GUIDANCE:

    Adulteration by Thrips

    The following represents criteria for recommending legal action to CFSAN/Office of *Compliance*/Division of Enforcement (HFS-605):

    The sauerkraut exceeds an average of 50 thrips per 100 grams.

    *Material between asterisks is new or revised*

    Issued: 8/24/70
    Revised: 8/23/73
    Reissued: 10/1/80
    Revised: 8/15/82
    Reissued: 12/8/88
    Revised: 3/95, 5/2005

    http://www.fda.gov/ora/compliance_ref/cpg/cpgfod/cpg585-750.htm

    #11
    Foodbme
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    RE: Can you freeze sauerkraut ??? 2008/10/06 13:20:04 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by wheregreggeats.com

    And, what do the lawmakers say?

    Sec. 585.750 Sauerkraut - Definition; Adulteration by Thrips (CPG 7114.23)

    BACKGROUND:

    Food Inspection Decision (F.I.D.) 196, issued August 1925, defined sauerkraut. Since that time the definition, essentially unchanged through the revision that appeared in Service and Regulatory Announcements (S.R.A.) F.D. No. 2, Rev. 5, November 1936, has been used as a guide for officials in enforcing the Food and Drug Act of 1906 and the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act of 1938. The definition follows:

    Sauerkraut: The product, of characteristic acid flavor, obtained by the full fermentation, chiefly lactic, of properly prepared and shredded cabbage in the presence of not less than 2 percent nor more than 3 percent of salt. It contains, upon completion of the fermentation, not less than 1.5 percent of acid, expressed as lactic acid. Sauerkraut which has been rebrined in the process of canning or repacking, contains not less than 1 percent of acid, expressed as lactic acid.

    Shortly after enactment of the 1938 Act, sauerkraut was among the foods exempted from label declaration of ingredients requirement for labeling of nonstandardized foods. The exemption was based on the expectation that standards would soon be established. However, standards for this product were not established and on September 17, 1959, the exemption was terminated.

    POLICY:

    In the absence of a standard of identity, the term “sauerkraut” is considered the common or usual name for a product obtained by the lactic acid fermentation of cabbage in the presence of salt. Products which have not been fermented, but owe their acidity to added vinegar, acetic acid or other acidifiers are not entitled to the name sauerkraut. Ingredients of sauerkraut must be listed on the label by their common or usual name in descending order of predominance.

    REGULATORY ACTION GUIDANCE:

    Adulteration by Thrips

    The following represents criteria for recommending legal action to CFSAN/Office of *Compliance*/Division of Enforcement (HFS-605):

    The sauerkraut exceeds an average of 50 thrips per 100 grams.

    *Material between asterisks is new or revised*

    Issued: 8/24/70
    Revised: 8/23/73
    Reissued: 10/1/80
    Revised: 8/15/82
    Reissued: 12/8/88
    Revised: 3/95, 5/2005

    http://www.fda.gov/ora/compliance_ref/cpg/cpgfod/cpg585-750.htm


    How many Bureaucrats does it take to define Sauerkraut???
    One to shread the Cabbage,
    One to get the crock,
    One to add the salt,
    One to add the water,
    Ten to supervise them.
    One to manage the supervisors
    Six to write up the regulations,
    And an entire department to insure compliance!

    God Help us!
    #12
    MiamiDon
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    RE: Can you freeze sauerkraut ??? 2008/10/06 13:20:12 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by WarToad

    I wonder if vinegar in kraut is just a mass production speed method to approximating the naturally created acid from the slower salt fermentation method.


    Exactly so. Just like "half sour" pickles.
    #13
    Foodbme
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    RE: Can you freeze sauerkraut ??? 2008/10/06 13:26:41 (permalink)
    I've frozen and eaten Store bought Sauerkraut and lived to tell about it! I have a bag of Hebrew National Kraut in the Freezer as we speak and plan to eat it.
    If you're freezing your own, I suggest you use a vacuum sealing device to get as much air out of the bag as possible. Ziploc & Reynolds now make bags you can vacuum seal and are food safe.
    #14
    polish_buzz
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    Re:Can you freeze sauerkraut ??? 2009/02/13 19:58:03 (permalink)

    I have frozen sauerkraut. It's not as good once thawed. Real veggie freezing takes a strong fridge to lock in freshness. By the way, http://www.polishbuzz.com/ has some nice Polish recipes. Happy eating.
    #15
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