Christmas Dinner

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Sundancer7
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2003/12/02 18:55:02 (permalink)

Christmas Dinner

I recoginize that Christmas dinner is coming up soon and the problem I have is what do you do after Thanksgiving???? We did the turkey and the ham. Is there anything you can do add to the holiday spirit? I guess I can take a whole ham and bake it with orange marmalade, pineapple, brown sugar and a lot of of other stuff// I can take another turkey and do the sam as I did last week??? Is ther anything other than that I can do to remain traditional and still be appreciated by my visitors???

Thanks for your advice.

Paul E. Smith
Knoxville, TN
#1

47 Replies Related Threads

    lleechef
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    RE: Christmas Dinner 2003/12/02 19:13:53 (permalink)
    A whole prime rib, bones in and fat cap on roasted Cajun style always gets them. Crown roast of pork is nice too, but I prefer that for New Year's Day. I once had 22 at my house for Christmas dinner, did 2 prime ribs this way, made great au jus, homemade horseradish, a large platter of veggies, roasted some potatoes, it was one of the best Christmas dinners I ever cooked. Simple and yummy.
    #2
    Sundancer7
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    RE: Christmas Dinner 2003/12/02 19:32:01 (permalink)
    llechef: The prime rib sounds excellent although I have been reluctant to do one of those. Please give me your advice on how to do it.


    Paul E. Smith
    Knoxville, TN
    #3
    lleechef
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    RE: Christmas Dinner 2003/12/02 19:38:57 (permalink)
    Sundancer, please advise how many people (approximately) you'll be cooking for, as I have done it two ways, one method for large crowds and another (a little better for smaller gatherings). It is exquisite, believe me and nothing scary to handle! I just don't want to go to all the length of posting both methods because this does involve a two-day process. Thanks! After I posted that thread I remembered about a French potato dish that would knock your guests' socks off and involves four ingredients: potatoes, oil, salt, pepper. Only prerequisite is that you have a mandoline (the kind for cooking, not playing). Can also post this recipe if you're interested.
    #4
    Sundancer7
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    RE: Christmas Dinner 2003/12/02 19:46:29 (permalink)
    llechef: There will be less than a dozen. I also like the gravy from the prime rib. I will appreciate your advice;.

    I hope there is a little day light left in your neck of the woods

    Paul E. Smith
    Knoxville , TN
    #5
    LizzieR
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    RE: Christmas Dinner 2003/12/02 22:42:31 (permalink)
    This Christmas we are having a turducken. I just ordered it from New Orleans! It's a boned turkey stuffed with duck and chicken and pork dressing. In the past I have made all what you others have mentioned including pork tenderloin, which is delicious, fast to cook and easy.Ditto for beef tenderloin.
    #6
    jgleduc
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    RE: Christmas Dinner 2003/12/02 23:42:21 (permalink)
    Prime rib is indeed a good choice for Christmas, but I'd also suggest a leg (or two!) of lamb. Preferably with a good dijon mustard and garlic-based paste and then grilled to medium rare.
    #7
    lleechef
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    RE: Christmas Dinner 2003/12/03 00:52:42 (permalink)
    Sundancer, It's getting late here and even later where you are.....will give explicit directions on cooking a most delicious Cajun prime rib tomorrow. In fact we were talking tonight about Christmas dinner........we've decided to do a Cajun prime rib!
    #8
    lleechef
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    RE: Christmas Dinner 2003/12/03 00:58:49 (permalink)
    BTW, the sun comes up around 10AM and sets at 4PM, it'll get worse as the Winter Solstice rolls around in 3 weeks (Dec. 21st where we'll only have barely 4 hours of daylight). Such is life in the Arctic, but you won't hear us complaining when we're on our boat, catching halibut and salmon and we have 22 hours of daylight!!!
    #9
    Sundancer7
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    RE: Christmas Dinner 2003/12/03 05:36:49 (permalink)
    lleechef: I did the halibut thing in Homer a few years ago. I caught a couple. I was hoping to catch the large one but that did not happen.

    I cannot wait for your cajun prime rib. That is what I am going to do.
    It is 37 degrees in Knoxville and cloudy.

    Paul E. Smith
    Knoxville, TN
    #10
    meowzart
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    RE: Christmas Dinner 2003/12/03 09:32:21 (permalink)
    I will be making rack of lamb this Christmas. I was going to do a crown roast with the frilly things and all on the bones, but I decided to plate from the kitchen, so what would be the point? It will be served with mashed potatoes or polenta (haven't decided yet) and a very festive red pepper and spinach sautee.

    Next year I may try the prime rib thing. The au jus and horseradish sound perfectly decadent for a special Christmas meal.

    Clothier, I LOVE brisket. Can I claim Jewishness for a day and come on over? I'm actually not Christian either. Just a heathen who loves the holidays!!!

    Fa la la la la....
    #11
    RubyRose
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    RE: Christmas Dinner 2003/12/03 10:03:18 (permalink)
    We don't have a Christmas dinner. We have a brunch with people who don't have other places to go stopping in to visit and eat and then a bread, salad and homemade soup bar set up all evening on Christmas night with a different cast of characters. I make about 90% of the food ahead of time and just heat it up.

    To me, Christmas is a day for relaxing with family and friends and playing with toys , not producing a big dinner, like we do for Thanksgiving.
    #12
    Lone Star
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    RE: Christmas Dinner 2003/12/03 10:20:52 (permalink)
    Our traditional Christmas eve dinner is a big pot of chili, beans, tamales, queso, and guacamole.

    If it is our time to go to the in-laws on Christmas day, they do the turkey/dressing traditional dinner. If we go to my mother's - you never can tell. Sometimes we all just make a lot of different appetizers, and one year we all went to an Indian restaurant and it was one of the most memorable Christmas dinners we have had. I don't know if the other clientele there that day was celebrating Christmas, but everyone was done up in beautiful saris, little boys in suits and little girls in lots of lace and bows. We had a marvelous time.
    #13
    Cakes
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    RE: Christmas Dinner 2003/12/03 10:58:18 (permalink)
    We have had standing rib roast for Chistmas diner for the last several years. We may have something else this year. Have you seen what has happened to the price of beef? You will need to take out a second mortgage!

    Cakes
    #14
    Julia I
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    RE: Christmas Dinner 2003/12/03 11:36:30 (permalink)
    Christmas Eve always means Black Beans and Rice, a Cuban Christmas eve tradition. OK, we're not Cuban, but black beans have become a tradition in our family, too.

    Christmas usually means prime rib. This year we will be serving it with home-prepared horseradish. (This is the first time that we have tried making horseradish at home, so the recipe still needs some work.)
    #15
    lleechef
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    RE: Christmas Dinner 2003/12/03 11:47:22 (permalink)
    Sundancer, here is your Cajun prime rib recipe.
    Get a whole prime rib with the FAT CAP ON...very important (you may have to special order this from your butcher). On the morning of the 24th,remove the fat cap and make some small slits through the silverskin of the meat (so the seasoning gets down in there). Put a layer of coarsely ground black pepper, followed by a layer of garlic powder, followed by a layer of blackening spice (Prudhomme's, Emeril's or your own....I have a recipe for my own if you want it). Replace the fat cap, tie up with butcher's twine and place in fridge for 24 hours.
    On the 25th place in a roasting pan, fat side up, uncovered. Roast at 550 for 35 mins. Turn oven down to 400 and continue roasting for another hour. Remove from oven and untie fat cap and discard. Continue roasting until internal temp is 120 (for rare). Let stand at least 30 mins before carving.
    The way we do it in the restaurant is same as above but after the first 35 mins. at 550 we take it out and cool and put back in the fridge. Then cut it into portions and when we get an order, coat the meat with blackening spice and cook in a SMOKING HOT cast iron skillet. That method is very very delicious also, something you might want to try for a smaller crowd, outside on the grill as it does smoke alot. I know I would not want to be fooling around with this at the last minute for a dozen people on Christmas! The above roasting method works beautifully. Enjoy!
    #16
    Sundancer7
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    RE: Christmas Dinner 2003/12/03 13:30:31 (permalink)
    Lleechef: Thanks for the recipe. I will follow it and let you know how I do.

    Thanks,
    Paul E. Smith
    Knoxville, TN
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    Bushie
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    RE: Christmas Dinner 2003/12/03 14:13:05 (permalink)
    Thanks, lleechef! Now I know what I'm having for Christmas dinner!

    Please share that blackening spice recipe of yours!
    #18
    lleechef
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    RE: Christmas Dinner 2003/12/03 14:39:47 (permalink)
    Bushie! Congrats!!! You're a Double Chili Cheeseburger now!!
    Here's the recipe for the blackening spice, I'll post it in PARTS as opposed to CUPS and everyone can make as much or as little as desired, as long as you get the ratio right.
    3 parts paprika
    1 part cayenne pepper (do not get these two reversed, one of my cooks did once and set all the diner's mouths on FIRE )
    1 part fine ground black pepper
    1 part white pepper
    1 part salt
    1/2 part onion powder
    1/2 part garlic powder
    1/3 part dried thyme leaves
    1/3 part dried basil leaves

    Mix all ings. together.....caution, sneeze zone here....and store in airtight container.
    #19
    Bushie
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    RE: Christmas Dinner 2003/12/03 14:42:22 (permalink)
    Thanks. And, thanks.
    #20
    EdSails
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    RE: Christmas Dinner 2003/12/03 17:07:13 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by clothier

    I know this is somewhat off topic (what a shock from me, huh?)but for hanukah at our house we either do roast chicken or roast brisket.


    Brisket.....latkes......I guess the time is close. Two and a half more weeks to go!
    #21
    Bushie
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    RE: Christmas Dinner 2003/12/03 17:32:22 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by EdSails

    Two and a half more weeks to go!

    Holy %#$@&%&!!! Only two and a half weeks???? " /> Man, I better get off my duff!

    Thanks for the "heads-up" Ed! I really thought I had more time than that... (where DOES it go?) Must have been thinking about martinis.
    #22
    EdSails
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    RE: Christmas Dinner 2003/12/03 18:24:34 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by Bushie

    quote:
    Originally posted by EdSails

    Two and a half more weeks to go!

    Holy %#$@&%&!!! Only two and a half weeks???? " /> Man, I better get off my duff!

    Thanks for the "heads-up" Ed! I really thought I had more time than that... (where DOES it go?) Must have been thinking about martinis.

    I'll drink to that!
    #23
    EdSails
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    RE: Christmas Dinner 2003/12/04 13:30:40 (permalink)
    Usually for Christmas dinner I make prime rib or roast duck. I've also made beef Wellington-------costco usually has great filet roasts for that. I might just to do it this year also-----------it's definitely a showy piece.
    For Chanukah I'll take a page from Clothier and do brisket--------it'll be the S.O.'s and her family's first chance to see what it's like. Plus my daughter will really enjoy some hot and heavy dreidel playing. Latkes with applesauce and sour cream----yum!

    OK, so I swing both ways these days!
    #24
    RubyRose
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    RE: Christmas Dinner 2003/12/04 15:53:11 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by EdSails

    Usually for Christmas dinner I make prime rib or roast duck. I've also made beef Wellington-------costco usually has great filet roasts for that. I might just to do it this year also-----------it's definitely a showy piece.


    For a showpiece dinner, I have made a beef tenderloin stuffed with lobster tails - sort of an instant surf 'n' turf.
    #25
    ocdreamr
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    RE: Christmas Dinner 2003/12/04 16:46:48 (permalink)
    For many years I had an open house for Christmas with people coming & going over several hours, so I just did a buffet with hot & cold dishes. Last year I did dinner for the first time in a couple of years. It was just four of us, so I did something simple. I made fettucine Alfredo with shrimp, sauteing the shrimp in butter & garlic before adding to the sauce. I served it with a salad of bibb lettuces with a vinegrette dressing. It made for an easy but elegant dinner.
    #26
    eaglerich
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    RE: Christmas Dinner 2003/12/04 19:33:16 (permalink)
    LoneStar, I am considering making tamales for Christmas this year. I know they are the traditional dish for the Navidad celebration. Do you make your own, and are they as labor-intensive as the recipes indicate?
    #27
    EliseT
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    RE: Christmas Dinner 2003/12/05 03:26:43 (permalink)
    Eaglerich: Check this thread out for recipe and discussion.

    http://www.roadfood.com/Forums/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=495
    #28
    Lone Star
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    RE: Christmas Dinner 2003/12/05 10:03:14 (permalink)
    eaglerich -I have never made tamales, I always purchase them from individuals who sell them at this time of year in our neck of the woods.

    I know they are very labor intensive, but can be a lot of fun. I believe EliseT is having a tamale making party this year.

    My brothers mother-in-law (who is of Mexican descent) declared 4 years ago that she was no longer making the tamales at Christmastime any more. None of her daughters picked up the tradition, and my brother had been sad since.

    We are expecting our fax order form today from the little ladies at "Fiesta Taco". I hope they send it. They are a little "soup-nazish". No Orders before December 5th! You must wait for fax! No website this year! Too busy!". I am at their mercy.

    Good luck!
    #29
    JaneDough
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    RE: Christmas Dinner 2003/12/06 15:06:33 (permalink)
    When I was a [young Jewish] kid, we'd be invited to my Dad's business partner's home for Christmas dinner. Both husband & wife cooked a sumptuous meal together from scratch, ALWAYS starting w/ the best lobster bisque I ever tasted (then or since). For the entree there'd usually be some kind of exotic (to me) meat, like venison, on one occasion actually bagged by Dad (yes, there ARE Jewish hunters!) & his partner on a hunting trip. And I'll never forget the whipped(!) potatoes, with lots of butter, cream & black pepper, and a surprising dash of sugar.

    They lived in a glass-front house on top of a hill overlooking the town below, and as far as downtown Philadelphia on a clear night. The floors were all white marble, with hot water pipes underneath, so they never had to wear slippers! (Oh, the things kids remember!) A tradition developed (I'm Jewish, remember?) where one of us kids would always manage to [accidentally] knock a glass Christmas ball off the tree on our way out, and it would crash to the marble floor, smashing into smithereens. Luckily, they had a good sense of humor, and we still got to open our special gifts they'd placed under their tree for us.

    Uncle Al was a big man with the biggest hands I'd ever seen in my life! He used a cereal bowl w/ a giant handle on the side to drink coffee because his fingers were too big to fit through a normal coffee cup! As massive as he was (he reminded me of Paul Bunyan), Uncle Al was a very gentle man, and always impressed me that he was so skilled in the kitchen. (MY Dad, G-d bless him, didn't know his way around his own kitchen!)

    Once I grew up (and Aunt Edith and Uncle Al passed away), we celebrated the traditional "Jewish Christmas:" Chinese food & a movie. <LOL> Or, the whole family would get together @ Mom & Dad's (nobody usually worked that day), and celebrate my birthday (the 26th). Now, Mom winters in FL, it's my first holiday season as a new bride, Hanukah (one of many Jewish holidays born out of the tradition of "They tried to kill us; we beat them; LET'S EAT!") overlaps with Christmas (which falls on a Thursday) and I have to work on my birthday (Friday). So, it's anybody's guess what Christmas dinner will be like this year.
    #30
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