Church suppers and Firemen's dinners

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chezkatie
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2003/09/26 20:07:29 (permalink)

Church suppers and Firemen's dinners

I do not think that this subject has even been discussed but I think that the best regional food (and good cooks) can be found at church suppers and Firemen's dinners. This is a taste of the real America and I have many fond memories of some of these dinners.

For example, I knew that the election day lunch at Mt. Pleasant Church would consist of boiled sweet apples, meatloaf and scalloped potatoes. The election night supper out at Hannibal Center would always have fork tender baked ham and a wonderful sauerkraut salad. The firemen's dinners are always Cornell style chicken, a couple of salads, a roll and a big slab of homemade pie. The Harvest supper out in Victory was delicious roast beef with wonderful fluffy mashed potatoes, rich gravy and always some great mashed squash. Homemade pies are always on the menu......some are fabulous and some are quite ordinary......just like us as cooks!

Many people sort of look down their nose at these places but I am glad that I can appreciate them as "public" dinners. along with Roadfood restaurants, are the real America and I am glad that I am smart enough to appreciate them!! (oh dear......only wish they would serve wine to make my life complete!}
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    Liketoeat
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    RE: Church suppers and Firemen's dinners 2003/09/26 21:01:50 (permalink)
    chezkatie, while we don't have election day lunches or suppers or firemen's dinners, we do have periodic church, community, club potlucks; town homecomings; school suppers; church and school bazaars which I envision to at least be along the order of the meals/gatherings you describe. And I could not agree more fully with your comments. You have told it like it is and expressed all in much more effective manner than I could ever do. Loved most of all your comment that you are smart enough to appreciate them; I'll have to claim that I am too, and I feel sorry for those who aren't; just hope they don't strain their eyes too badly looking down their noses and never knowing what they are missing.
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    Geoff Steinberg
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    RE: Church suppers and Firemen's dinners 2003/09/26 21:11:05 (permalink)
    Every now and then I'm dragged to a disgusting extended family pot luck that has those kinds of dishes brought (though more ofthen than not people bring fairly nasty Jewish cuisine). My favourite comes from my Cousin Mandy, who sometimes brings a treat (for me) that sounds disgusting but is in fact really tasty. Cherry jello mixed with (get ready for it) turkey sausage, onions, and stuffing. It sounds really bad and looks pretty bad too, but tastes very similar to a turkey dinner with cranberries. Not sure if it's supposed to be dessert or a main course, but every time it's there I'm sure I won't eat any and wind up devouring half of the bowl. I also tell people around me that it's bad so there's more for me, so I've got that going for me too.
    #3
    1bbqboy
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    RE: Church suppers and Firemen's dinners 2003/09/27 03:08:16 (permalink)
    arggggh! all our elections are mail-in ballots in oregon, but we do have a nifty day of the dead meal at the grade school because of all the mexican immigrant families bringing their homemade dishes. good stuff
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    hermitt4d
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    RE: Church suppers and Firemen's dinners 2003/09/27 05:52:18 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by chezkatie

    I do not think that this subject has even been discussed but I think that the best regional food (and good cooks) can be found at church suppers and Firemen's dinners. This is a taste of the real America and I have many fond memories of some of these dinners.

    Many people sort of look down their nose at these places but I am glad that I can appreciate them as "public" dinners. along with Roadfood restaurants, are the real America and I am glad that I am smart enough to appreciate them!! (oh dear......only wish they would serve wine to make my life complete!}


    Ahh, yes, agreed. Particularly in small towns. Church potlucks are usually great eating; the best cooks in small towns tend to be home cooks though there is a disgusting tendency in recent years at the one I freqent most often to bring a bucket of chicken from a drive thru or a casserole from a supermarket.

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    Mayhaw Man
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    RE: Church suppers and Firemen's dinners 2003/09/27 07:29:02 (permalink)
    You know, in Louisiana we generally don't bother with the election day dinner, but candidates (actually their workers, traditionally known as bag men, due to the brown bags full of green they carry) often extend the courtesy of a little cash to their constituents. Here in Louisiana we call this gift voting encouragement and appreciation money. Unfortunately, the Feds call it a federal crime.

    On a lighter note, one of my favorite cookbooks is the "Recipes of the Women of the First Baptist Church of Bastrop, Louisiana". It is a suprisingly large cookbook. Published in 1953 (don't look for it on Amazon) it is a virtual bible of Delta cooking. Unlike later books (Jr League type books), this one is just pure native food. You won't find much seafood, but there are alot of interesting recipes for bass, bream, catfish, and eel (eel has pretty much ceased to be on most menus these days, which is a shame, because I really like it).
    The cake recipes are awesome (Step 1...get some butter and sugar) and the pie recipes are even better (Step one....get some lard and some flour). This book was written a long time before the Atkins diet. I am going to post a recipe or two as soon as I get home.




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    Liketoeat
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    RE: Church suppers and Firemen's dinners 2003/09/27 09:01:36 (permalink)
    Fortunately our various potlucks, club/community meals, etc. have primarily escaped the scourge of store bought foods. However, there is one grocery deli which does such a good job with its fried chicken that when its brought, it's often gone before some of the home fried which is there. Apart from that chicken, any other store bought which might be brought is usually untouched; just sits there looking pathetic and out of place.
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    Mayhaw Man
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    RE: Church suppers and Firemen's dinners 2003/09/27 09:51:09 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by Liketoeat

    Fortunately our various potlucks, club/community meals, etc. have primarily escaped the scourge of store bought foods. However, there is one grocery deli which does such a good job with its fried chicken that when its brought, it's often gone before some of the home fried which is there. Apart from that chicken, any other store bought which might be brought is usually untouched; just sits there looking pathetic and out of place.


    Not only that, but if yo want the church ladies to talk about you at the Circle meeting, bring a bunch of storebought food to an eating event........"Did you see what Lorena brought, I think she must have got that cake at Wal Mart. She can't cook a lick, and have you seen her yard? No one has mowed it in two weeks. I heard her husband Bobby was keeping time with his secretary, too. That little hussy".

    It can be just as bad if all you bring every time is Pasta Salad, which in my humble opinion, is just an easy out for pot lucks.
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    Mayhaw Man
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    RE: Church suppers and Firemen's dinners 2003/09/27 10:00:18 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by Liketoeat

    Fortunately our various potlucks, club/community meals, etc. have primarily escaped the scourge of store bought foods. However, there is one grocery deli which does such a good job with its fried chicken that when its brought, it's often gone before some of the home fried which is there. Apart from that chicken, any other store bought which might be brought is usually untouched; just sits there looking pathetic and out of place.


    Not only that, but if you want the church ladies to talk about you at the Circle meeting, bring a bunch of storebought food to an eating event........"Did you see what Lorena brought, I think she must have got that cake at Wal Mart. She can't cook a lick, and have you seen her yard? No one has mowed it in two weeks. I heard her husband Bobby was keeping time with his secretary, too. That little hussy".

    It can be just as bad if all you bring every time is Pasta Salad, which in my humble opinion, is just an easy out for pot lucks.
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    KimChee43
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    RE: Church suppers and Firemen's dinners 2003/09/27 11:00:24 (permalink)
    What a great topic! It brought back memories, that's for sure.

    Most of the churches around here have pancake suppers, usually right before Lent begins...pancakes, sausage, juice, and coffee. The Boy Scouts have spaghetti dinners during the year at various churches (never been to one, though).

    A local church just had a pig roast a while ago...pork, baked beans, and coleslaw were provided. The parishioners provided other side dishes and desserts.

    I remember roast beef dinners and rouladen dinners at neighborhood churches a long time ago. Parishioners provided the desserts. The "from scratch" ones always went first. Heaven forbid, you were at the end of the line...you'd get a store-bought dessert.
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    Mayhaw Man
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    RE: Church suppers and Firemen's dinners 2003/09/27 12:06:44 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by KimChee43

    What a great topic! It brought back memories, that's for sure.

    I remember roast beef dinners and rouladen dinners at neighborhood churches a long time ago.


    What is Rouladen? I might be missing something. Hopefully it is not related to Lutefisk
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    ConeyIslandLou
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    RE: Church suppers and Firemen's dinners 2003/09/27 12:25:12 (permalink)
    My family's church has had a May Morning Breakfast on the first Saturday in May for 50+ years now...first choice: strawberries or orange juice [people ACTUALLY select OJ!]...then corn flakes or oatmeal...then scrambled eggs and bacon..all accompanied by fresh baked drop biscuits with home made preserves....yum!
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    mayor al
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    RE: Church suppers and Firemen's dinners 2003/09/27 12:39:23 (permalink)
    Most of the Summer weekends will find one of the churches in the area holding a Chicken Dinner. The normal menu is a quarter or half chicken, some sliced Ham issued when you get your plate and utensils upon entering, then at your communal-table will be green beans, potatoes and gravy, slaw, cukes in vinegar or sour cream, corn, and of course, PIES of Various Types.
    We had an elderly lady confide in us at one of these dinners this summer- that she didn't cook a meal any weekend from mid-June until now (Sept 14th). She and her husband made the rounds of the church dinners.
    If I were to rank the qualities to a demonination (in this area) at the top of the list would be the Lutherans...They have a church packed with grey-haired folks who hold by the principles that made church suppers great. Next comes the Catholics...Their suppers are above average, and they always have a bunch of wheel of fortune/cakewalk types of gambling to entertain you while you wait for a seat. Next come the tradional Protestants--Baptists, Methodists etc etc. They do a good job too, but are a step behind the leading 2 groups. At the end of the line, and not getting much attention from us anymore after several tries, come the "Modern" Protestants..The guitar-strumming,Hug-A-Yuppie folks who run to the dinners between soccer practice and washing the dog...so they only have time to run thru the WalMart deli...and the results are usually dismal.
    Please note I am not an active member of any of these groups, so I have no ax to grind. This review is based on food and fellowship only!! I can't help but think that if the Last Supper were to be scheduled now, I would hope some of our local Lutheran Ladies would be asked to cater it.
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    Liketoeat
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    RE: Church suppers and Firemen's dinners 2003/09/27 13:22:43 (permalink)
    One nice thing which one Baptist Church here does is every year around Valentine's Day sponsor a Senior Citizens' Soup Love Luncheon to which all (regardless of which or any denomination/church affiliation) seniors (very loosely defined as age 50 and over) in the area are invited. The response is usually good and its offers a fun winter mid-day change-of-pace/outing. The foods are all homemade and delicious - chili, usually couple of varieties of stews, and about half dozen different -including some unusual- soups; cornbread and crackers, sandwiches, desserts, coffee & tea. Good opportunity for seniors to visit and enjoy delicious free lunch after which there is usually enjoyable entertainment of some sort, most frequently some type of musical program.
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    KimChee43
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    RE: Church suppers and Firemen's dinners 2003/09/27 13:31:55 (permalink)
    MAYHAW MAN: Rouladen is a German specialty. At the "Rouladen Church Supper" I attended once many years ago, the "Rouladen" consisted of a piece of beef with a filling inside, rolled up "jelly-roll style" and secured with a toothpick. I can't recall the filling exactly, but pickles and bacon stand out. Can't recall the sides either, but the desserts were furnished by the parishioners. By the way, this church held only one "Rouladen Supper", probably because the entree was too labor-intensive. They went back to "Roast Beef Suppers" after that.

    Just remembered this...a church in our area has a "Fish Boil" once a year. I think they bring in a caterer from Door County. I've never attended this church supper. It was rather pricey, and you didn't receive much for the money, if I remember correctly.
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    ConeyIslandLou
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    RE: Church suppers and Firemen's dinners 2003/09/27 14:11:02 (permalink)
    Besides the gambling,the other great things about Catholic PICNICS is that people actually bring beer or wine....There is a local couple who actually make an extra living out of owning professional deep fryers,and catering church/fire company/fraternal organizations fish frys around here..and there is somebody else who owns a bunch of gas griddles and rents them out for pancake breakfasts/suppers..Tomorrow morning is the unofficial start of Pancake Season around here- a local fire company that always has a GREAT breakfast [made to order eggs and real..WARM maple syrup..cafeteria style...]has their first of the season. The local Elks have a nice one too-you actually sit and get SERVED-the first one is always the Sunday before Election Day so, all the local pols show up..[meaning you get waffles along with your pancakes!]
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    Mayhaw Man
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    RE: Church suppers and Firemen's dinners 2003/09/27 14:25:27 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by ConeyIslandLou

    Besides the gambling,the other great things about Catholic PICNICS is that people actually bring beer or wine....There is a local couple who actually make an extra living out of owning professional deep fryers,and catering church/fire company/fraternal organizations fish frys around here..and there is somebody else who owns a bunch of gas griddles and rents them out for pancake breakfasts/suppers..Tomorrow morning is the unofficial start of Pancake Season around here- a local fire company that always has a GREAT breakfast [made to order eggs and real..WARM maple syrup..cafeteria style...]has their first of the season. The local Elks have a nice one too-you actually sit and get SERVED-the first one is always the Sunday before Election Day so, all the local pols show up..[meaning you get waffles along with your pancakes!]


    Funny you mentioned the nun thing.

    In New Orleans, there is ahuge church @ Napoleon Ave. and Magazine St. (St Stephens) that vends stuff during Carnival Parades (about half of the New Orleans parades begin on that end of the avenue). They serve all kinds of food (jambalaya, home made pastries, etc.) but they also sell beer right out of the front windows of the Rec. hall (of course, in New Orleans, the rec hall windows would be designed for this). It is always fun saying "thank you, sister" and walking away with a 16 oz. Abita, a plate of Jambalaya, and a fresh praline.

    From the spot where the beer is you can see 1) Ann Rice's big, giant, ex-Nunnery 2) the second district police station 3) and the biggest dive on Napoleon Ave, The Club 4) My old house on Napoleon Ave. Oddly (but not suprisingly if you know me very well), I have spent a little time in all of them at one time or another. Frankly, I like The Club best)
    #17
    Boatman
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    RE: Church suppers and Firemen's dinners 2003/09/27 15:12:19 (permalink)
    Where I grew up, in northwest Indiana, the king of church fund-raisers was the all-you-can-eat-LAKE-PERCH-fish-fry. Potato salad, homemade pie, but the star of course was the deep-fried lake perch. No matter what town was holding the event, they would always hire the LaCrosse Lions Club to do the actual cooking, which took place in an old school bus custom-converted to a fish kitchen. This tradition faded then disappeared in the 1970s, when restrictions on commercial fishing of the great lakes caused the cost of lake perch to skyrocket. Organizations which still held fish fries offered the much less tasty pollock. The lake perch fries made a comeback in the 1990s (with fish from Canada), faded again. Today only one church that I know of carries on the original concept, the United Methodist church in Hanna. Their annual event (all the lake perch you can eat for $10) in held each October -- and you can bet I'm heartbroken that a previous engagenment is going to keep me away from this year's. (I don't believe they ever make much money off of me,) And, yes, the LaCrosse Lions and their bus are still who everyone relies on, no matter what kind of fish the event is serving.
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    Boatman
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    RE: Church suppers and Firemen's dinners 2003/09/27 15:22:25 (permalink)
    Where I live now, in Indianapoiis, church dinners (and breakfasts) are still around -- the hard part is finding out about them. The two best I know of -- both just out of town -- are an annual (November) Quaker smorgasboard in Camby, which always includes chicken pot pie; and a rather odd Baptist event in Michigantown, featuring chicken-and-noodles served over mashed potatoes. Yum!
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    ocdreamr
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    RE: Church suppers and Firemen's dinners 2003/09/27 21:31:19 (permalink)
    When I lived in Frederick County MD, every week of the summer was a different Volunteer fire Dept Carnival, each would have a dinner one night, that would get me through the summer, come fall the churches started theirs, Ham & fried oysters. In Baltimore, St Leo's in Baltimore's Little Italy is known for their Italian dinners ( all those white haired ladies cooking their hearts out) & there is a Church in South Baltimore that is known for their Saurbraten dinners. The fire halls & churchs of Southern Maryland are known for their stuffed ham dinners. Slippery Pot Pie dinners on Maryland's eastern shore. Then there's the various crab feasts & bull & oyster roasts held by various organizations around the state throughout the year. There is a reason Maryland is known as "The Land of Pleasant Living"
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    Lucky Bishop
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    RE: Church suppers and Firemen's dinners 2003/09/28 02:28:17 (permalink)
    The Saturday before Thanksgiving, every year, there's a church game supper in Bradford, Vermont that my wife's family has been going to for over 20 years. You get tickets for a particular time frame, say 6:30-7, and when you show up, they hand each of you a card and you hang out in the pews for a while. There's usually a rummage sale in the back and music in the front. Then when your numbers are called, you troop down to the basement and get handed a tray. You get a variety of game meats, always including bear, beaver, pheasant casserole, venison in a variety of forms, wild boar ditto, rabbit pie and a few surprises. Everything's identified by colored toothpicks and you're handed a scorecard so you can remember what you're eating.

    Sides are mashed potatoes, gravy, squash, coleslaw and a wild game pate and crackers, which are served family-style on every table. Then when you're done, you get gingerbread, whipped cream and coffee. And you can buy fudge on your way out the door.

    Now, add to this feast the fact that earlier this afternoon, we eat a full lunch at Hart's Turkey Farm in New Hampshire and spend a couple hours at King Arthur Flour in Norwich. And that the next morning we have breakfast at the Chelsea Royal in Brattleboro. It's a very Roadfood-intensive weekend.
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    chezkatie
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    RE: Church suppers and Firemen's dinners 2003/09/28 08:33:53 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by Liketoeat

    Fortunately our various potlucks, club/community meals, etc. have primarily escaped the scourge of store bought foods. However, there is one grocery deli which does such a good job with its fried chicken that when its brought, it's often gone before some of the home fried which is there. Apart from that chicken, any other store bought which might be brought is usually untouched; just sits there looking pathetic and out of place.



    This brings back a great memory. Years ago, my father in law would get all dressed up in his "Sunday best" a few days a week. He would back his aged, but spotless "Caddy" out of the garage and head out at 4 pm for the church supper that he deemed to be the best one going on that particular evening. He had a mission to accomplish and that was to be the first one in line to get his ticket.

    He would then proceed directly to the "ladies doing the cooking" and question them on who had brought which pie. He knew the best pie maker at every church around and darn it all........he paid out good money for his supper and he was going to enjoy a piece of the very best pie every time! One evening at a church supper, where he belonged to the church, the ladies decided to play a trick on him. In advance, they had take a store-bought pie and cut a huge slice and transferred it to a plate. When he came up to them and asked if Mrs. Allen had brought her coconut cream pie, they told him that she had indeed and that they had saved a big piece for him. As the ladies later related to my husband, my father in law sat in silence and ate the whole piece of pie. He did not look left or right. When he had finished and was getting ready to leave, he told one of the ladies that Mrs. Allen should not be baking pies on a day when she felt as "poorly" as her pie was that night! We laughed about it for weeks.
    #22
    Liketoeat
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    RE: Church suppers and Firemen's dinners 2003/09/28 09:50:38 (permalink)
    Katie, the entire tale of your father-in-law (not just that particular pie eating part) was wonderful reading, and Lucky Bishop, I really envy you and your family in getting to take that weekend before Thanksgiving outing you described; the entire thing, but most particularly the church game supper, sounded so different and so delicious; just a totally delightful experience. Have enjoyed reading of many outings/roadfood experiences in posts to all these Roadfood topics during the past months, but your outing is the most appealing of all to me. Hope you all get to enjoy same again this November.
    #23
    Mayhaw Man
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    RE: Church suppers and Firemen's dinners 2003/09/28 10:53:32 (permalink)
    Another aspect of church food that I have enjoyed over the years is church sponsored delivery of meals to shut-ins during the holidays (I should probably admit at this point that I am not an active member of any church, although I was raised "in the Method" in the Delta of Louisiana, so it's in me and I guess that's good, but I think tht at this point my mother's prayers hping I will become a preacher are for nought).

    My wife and I, and subsequently our children have delivered meals many times on the holidays and I can honestly say I would be very pleased with someone bringing me the quality and quantity of food delivered around south La. This is not institutional meals on wheels stuff, but southern holiday cooking at it's finest (and it doesn't get any better than that).

    Turkey and oyster dressing, yeast rolls, cornbread, tomato aspic, real cranberry sauce (although I will admit I like the canned stuff more), squash and shrimp casserole, all manner of salads and every dessert imaginable (heavy on chess pie, mmmmmmm), ham, pork roast, etc. Even though we are sterotyped as eating it at all holiday meals, you rarely see jello molds (but I like 'em so too bad for you and more for me).

    These meals are made from scratch, with care, and I really like taking them around to the folks. They really appreciate it and it certainly beats sitting around and watching football with my useless brothers in law or sitting and listening to my sisters in law whine about the demise quality domestic help.
    #24
    Mayhaw Man
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    RE: Church suppers and Firemen's dinners 2003/09/28 11:02:22 (permalink)
    One more thing,

    There is a great cookbook/narrative called "Soul Food" by Joyce White that is a narrative of the food traditions in African American Churches in America. The recipes are a good place to start if you want to learn about REAL southern cooking and the history content is really interesting. As a bonus, if you like black and white photographic portraiture as much as I do, you will like this book. It should be in any library (it is in mine and our library system is terrible, so your much better library should have it).
    #25
    Julia I
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    RE: Church suppers and Firemen's dinners 2003/09/28 13:12:19 (permalink)
    Church meals around here seem to mostly be chicken roasts or pancake breakfasts, some of them pretty good. In Lent the church fish fries show up. YUM!! But my favorite mighe by my church's annual chili cookoff. Twenty pots of chili to choose from, with grated cheese, onions, sour cream, etc. available on the side. I usually manage to try about five kinds before I retreat to nurse my mistreated stomach at home.

    Here is a variation on the churches delivering meals theme. Does anyone else cook food in vast quantities for a church meal program? We make a giant pot of, well, macaroni, spaghetti sauce, ground beef and tomatoes to bring down to a meal program. No onions or heavy spices because too many people don't like them. It's not bad, but our neighbor brings a pot of anemic-looking macaroni and sauce with cut up bargain basement hot dogs and chopped zucchini frozen from last year. The guys at the meal program always discretely mix her contribution with something else to make it more palatable.
    #26
    skylar0ne
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    RE: Church suppers and Firemen's dinners 2003/09/28 15:38:05 (permalink)
    Our church has its own brick bar-b-q pit, and several times a year, we have fund raising BBQ's. The church brotherhood stays up all night on Fridays and Saturdays cooking the pork shoulders on the pit, then the ladies come in the morning and bring slaw, baked beans, and homemade desserts. Then we sell either plates or sandwiches all day Friday and all day Saturday. The only thing that's not homemade are the buns for the sandwiches, which we order from the local Merita bakery. We sell sandwiches for 2 bucks each, or a plate consisting of over a half pound of meat, baked beans, cole slaw, and a slice of pie or cake for 6 dollars. Since everything except the buns and shoulders is donated, and the workers are volunteers, we make quite a tidy little sum on these..we have practically paid for our church this way. We have also built up a wonderful rep for our food throughout the community,,,our Q is some of the best I've ever eaten,.
    #27
    harriet1954
    Double Chili Cheeseburger
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    RE: Church suppers and Firemen's dinners 2003/09/28 15:55:00 (permalink)
    I work with many volunteer firefighters & EMTs at my job (who consider their daytime paid job as their "other" job, so devoted are they to their admirable volunteer jobs). If I hear of a pancake breakfast being sponsored by one of their stations, I always try to make it. The food may not be the greatest all the time (particularly the eggs), but I always find something good, and always try to make it out there!

    And upon viewing this thread title, I feel a bit guilty because I said I'd really try to make the one held this morning, but alas it was a late night last night & we did not awaken until almost 11:00 this morning! Crazy! I know everything was gone by then. Well, hopefully I will not be chastised tomorrow at work, and I will try for next time...
    #28
    EliseT
    Filet Mignon
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    RE: Church suppers and Firemen's dinners 2003/09/28 17:13:18 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by Mayhaw Man

    You know, in Louisiana we generally don't bother with the election day dinner, but candidates (actually their workers, traditionally known as bag men, due to the brown bags full of green they carry) often extend the courtesy of a little cash to their constituents. Here in Louisiana we call this gift voting encouragement and appreciation money. Unfortunately, the Feds call it a federal crime.



    Well, you know why they bury the dead above ground in New Orleans, don't you?

    To make it easier for them to get out to vote!!!

    But seriously, growing up, our church had Menudo and pan dulce on Sundays, and tamales and burritos during fiestas. They used to fill emptied dried egg shells with confetti, and we loved chasing eachother around and smashing them on eachother's heads.

    The fire departments here often have pancake breakfasts, but there aren't any fish frys or things like that. I have quite a few "Church Supper" and "Community dinner" cookbooks. They're my favorites. People are proud and always bring their best dishes.

    #29
    Mayhaw Man
    Double Cheeseburger
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    RE: Church suppers and Firemen's dinners 2003/09/28 18:03:45 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by EliseT

    quote:
    Originally posted by Mayhaw Man

    You know, in Louisiana we generally don't bother with the election day dinner, but candidates (actually their workers, traditionally known as bag men, due to the brown bags full of green they carry) often extend the courtesy of a little cash to their constituents. Here in Louisiana we call this gift voting encouragement and appreciation money. Unfortunately, the Feds call it a federal crime.



    Well, you know why they bury the dead above ground in New Orleans, don't you?

    To make it easier for them to get out to vote!!!

    But seriously, growing up, our church had Menudo and pan dulce on Sundays, and tamales and burritos during fiestas. They used to fill emptied dried egg shells with confetti, and we loved chasing eachother around and smashing them on eachother's heads.

    The fire departments here often have pancake breakfasts, but there aren't any fish frys or things like that. I have quite a few "Church Supper" and "Community dinner" cookbooks. They're my favorites. People are proud and always bring their best dishes.




    Elise,
    Are you talking breakfast tamales here, those sweet ones with sugar/hay queso filling or something else? One of the women in my office in Mexico used to make those sweet ones and she would bring them to work on Sat morning (half day of work on Sat in MX, payroll at noon). Man were they good. And menudo and pan dulce make for amuch more interesting breakfast than pancakes. Your church had it going on, in my book!
    #30
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