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 Col. Newsome's Country Ham

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tomrod

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  • Joined: 10/31/2002
  • Location: Johnstown, OH
Col. Newsome's Country Ham Sun, 11/4/07 5:14 PM (permalink)
Has anyone ever tried/ordered Col. Bill Newsome's Aged Kentucky Country Ham? It is located in Princeton, KY and can be ordered online. I've always wanted to order a ham online and someone mentioned this place to me. Thoughts on if this place is good or any other ideas? Thanks for your help.

Tom
 
#1
    Poverty Pete

    • Total Posts: 2266
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    • Location: Nashville, TN
    RE: Col. Newsome's Country Ham Sun, 11/4/07 5:44 PM (permalink)
    I haven't had the ham, but his bacon is so salty as to make it inedible.
    A country ham costs a lot of money. I'd play it on the safe side and get it from Broadbent. Newsom's pimiento cheese is also not at all to my liking.
     
    #2
      tomrod

      • Total Posts: 12
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      • Location: Johnstown, OH
      RE: Col. Newsome's Country Ham Sun, 11/4/07 7:25 PM (permalink)
      Why is Broadbent's safer? Thanks for your help.
       
      #3
        mayor al

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        • Location: Louisville area, Southern Indiana
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        RE: Col. Newsome's Country Ham Sun, 11/4/07 7:52 PM (permalink)
        Broadbent make wonderful Country Ham, and Bacon as well. I have enjoyed both several times. I know Pov. Pete has also. I don't think you are risking much if you were to order from them. I have no experience with the Colonel Newsome's products, but if I am ordering a "Big Ticket" meat item (Like a Whole Ham) I would prefer not to go for (literally)"A Pig in a Poke". Pete's comment about his experience with Newsome's Bacon would be enough to have me hold off on a large order via the 'net' untill I had the chance to sample the quality of the Ham. I would check out the new product in a smaller way at a less critical time. The time being the busy holiday season.

        We also like Alan Benton's Hams from Tennessee. They are available online as well.
         
        #4
          Poverty Pete

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          RE: Col. Newsome's Country Ham Sun, 11/4/07 8:05 PM (permalink)
          Al, actually you HAVE had experience with Newsom's. That was the bacon we compared and contrasted with your Costco bacon last month. That was the bacon that was so salty we threw out most of it.
           
          #5
            mayor al

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            RE: Col. Newsome's Country Ham Sun, 11/4/07 8:56 PM (permalink)
            OK I stand corrected... I was more than willing to forget the Bacon...It was not something I care to remember!
             
            #6
              tomrod

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              • Location: Johnstown, OH
              RE: Col. Newsome's Country Ham Sun, 11/4/07 11:52 PM (permalink)
              Gentlemen,

              Thanks for your help and opinions. Maybe someday I'll take a drive down to Col. Newsomes and see about sampling. It could be fun as well as cost efficient. I'm just daydreaming about ham right now!

              Tom
               
              #7
                gcw

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                • Joined: 8/31/2006
                • Location: Canada, XX
                RE: Col. Newsome's Country Ham Mon, 11/5/07 1:57 AM (permalink)
                Mr. W. and I have been to Newsom's Hams. We stopped by on our way south in January 2006.

                Country ham is a treat for us, as it's not available in Canada, as far as I know, so on our way south each winter we search out producers that are not too far off our route, stop by and purchase a few pounds of ham and bacon, enough to last for the couple of months we're away, and do the same thing on our way back home. We purchased a few pounds of ham and a couple of pounds of bacon, virtually all Nancy Newsom Mahaffey, the current owner, had left at that time of the year. Apparently, you have to order well in advance.

                I agree with the posters above, we (husband, kids and myself) all found it so salty as to be virtually inedible, though I have to admit that didn't follow these directions about soaking the ham slices for in lukewarm water or sweet milk for up to 30 minutes.

                http://www.newsomscountryham.com/mealplanforn.html

                Of course, those instructions don't apply to the bacon, which we found too salty, by far, as well.
                 
                #8
                  edwmax

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                  • Location: Cairo, GA
                  RE: Col. Newsome's Country Ham Mon, 11/5/07 7:44 AM (permalink)
                  Just a note for those that don't know, and most folks don't. Old style Aged Country ham and bacon is very salty and dry. This was how the meat was preserved without refrigeration. This meat was intended to be used as seasoning meat in greens and beans and no additional or very little salt was added to the pot.

                  To cook the country or bacon as side meat, it is necessary to soak the meat to remove some or ALL of the salt before cooking. Also, the soaking adds water back to the meat so it wouldn’t be dry after cooking. The cooking directions given above in the link is correct. But note the step about the soaking of the meat. Don’t skip that step and it may take longer that 30 min., depends on your taste.

                  To make Red Eye Gravy, after frying put the country ham back into the pan and add a cup or more of water and let simmer a few minutes.

                  A lot of today’s so called country ham or bacon is made with a lot less salt. But these products or kept under refrigeration and doesn’t compare with the true aged Country hams or bacons.

                  Poverty Pete the bacon that you threw out just needed a soak before cooking. That bacon might have been some of the best bacon you’ve every had.
                   
                  #9
                    RibRater

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                    RE: Col. Newsome's Country Ham Mon, 11/5/07 10:31 AM (permalink)
                    quote:
                    Originally posted by pogophiles

                    edwmax -- I must disagree. I've been eating country ham all my life (my grandfather raised hogs and cured his own hams) and I have yet to see anyone soak a ham unless they were boiling it. If a country ham is so salty that you HAVE to soak it to make it edible, then the person curing the ham left it in the salt too long...



                    I've never eaten or prepared a salt cured country ham (or bacon) that didn't require soaking before cooking. Going back 40+ years of eating Smithfield Hams, every ham was soaked overnight before being baked.


                    (I think smithfield knows a little something about hams...and they recommend a soaking before cooking).
                     
                    #10
                      edwmax

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                      RE: Col. Newsome's Country Ham Mon, 11/5/07 10:53 AM (permalink)
                      I've grown up on the farm too. The hams we've cured don't have that much salt in them either. But they are not air dried and aged like the Country Hams I was referring to above. Those Hams have to have a LOT of SALT so they can be aged (and dried) for 3 to 6 months (no refrigeration) and can be stored WITHOUT refrigeration. These are hams (or bacon) that you see hanging in the store in bags or slices in plastic on the store shelf. Some brands more salty than others, but they are still salty.

                      The Hams your grandfather made were kept in the frig or freezer weren't they? I don't think his methods were that much different from my dad's or granddad's. These were gooooood hams too and not so salty.
                       
                      #11
                        edwmax

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                        • Location: Cairo, GA
                        RE: Col. Newsome's Country Ham Mon, 11/5/07 11:11 AM (permalink)
                        Thanks Larry for backing me up.

                        This type of Country ham is from the days of no refrigeration (1800's) and up until the 1940" or 1950's was very common. It's rarely made on the farm anymore. Only, the large Companies like Smithfield makes them now. During the aging process the ham will lose 1/2 it weight (water), thus the high price. But when soaked this weight will be gained back.

                        Some people buying this type of Country Ham just don't realize how salty it is or how to use it.
                         
                        #12
                          tomrod

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                          RE: Col. Newsome's Country Ham Mon, 11/5/07 5:44 PM (permalink)
                          Everyone thanks for all of the great info!!! Maybe I shouldn't be afraid of salty Col. Newsome's Hams and give it a good soak. This thread has given me confidence.
                           
                          #13
                            edwmax

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                            RE: Col. Newsome's Country Ham Mon, 11/5/07 6:09 PM (permalink)
                            Good Luck Tom.

                            But I wouldn't recommend that you try a whole ham your first time. Have it sliced and cook a few slices at a time. A supper with country ham, red gravy with biscuits or pancakes is heaven.
                             
                            #14
                              LuckyLabrador

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                              RE: Col. Newsome's Country Ham Tue, 11/6/07 11:07 AM (permalink)
                              Newsomes sells it's hams to many very famous Restaurants around the country, they do ship, are online and I recommend you try some of their "Preacher Ham", delicious, not salty, the bacon however is salty. Broadbent's Hickory bacon IMHO the best, same with the sausage...almost, you can buy it by the poke{2lb.sack] or pre sliced patties. I had 6 this morning. All real Country Hams need to be soaked, twice actually is better.

                              When I gave my order over the phone to Nancy, the owner, she said I didn't need to give her a credit card, she would just bill me, amazing! I made her take a card...The old South, the way it should be!
                               
                              #15
                                Rusty246

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                                RE: Col. Newsome's Country Ham Tue, 11/6/07 11:17 AM (permalink)
                                I'm hooked on Newsome's I've never tried hams elsewhere, well, except for Clifton Farms(I believe)that Publix carries most often. I buy this sliced when I'm out of Newsome's. I've bought 4 hams from Newsome's and have taken them to my local grocer for slicing. I wouldn't be opposed to trying hams from others, there just is no point where I'm concerned. My family and I are salt lovers as some familes are sweet lovers, I'll stick to Newsome's, I have never soaked it either...
                                The staff is VERY friendly also, if you didn't know better you'd think they were neighbors.
                                 
                                #16
                                  porkbeaks

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                                  RE: Col. Newsome's Country Ham Tue, 11/6/07 2:22 PM (permalink)
                                  I found this here:
                                  http://bbq.about.com/cs/pork/a/aa112903a.htm I think this guy usually knows what he's talking about.

                                  "A rare treat for the Holidays or anytime, Country Hams are the traditional hams that date back to the days before refrigeration. These cured hams are soaked in a salt water brine and smoked to preserve them. Today processes may vary but essentially this ham is salty and dry. Now this might sound like a bad thing but it certainly isn’t. A country ham, properly prepared is a rare treat.
                                  When selecting a country ham the first step is to make sure it is in fact a country ham. There are lots of kinds of ham on the market and a lot of things that people try to pass off as ham. A country ham is usually sold in a cloth bag, hanging. To follow this process you do not want to use what is called a City Ham.

                                  When you open up your country ham you might not like what you find. A country ham looks dried up and can be caked in mold. Sitting around, curing for what might be months causes the mold. Don’t worry, as long as the mold is on the outside only the ham is fine. Scrap off the mold and you’re in business.

                                  The first step to prepare a country ham is to get the excess salt out. Country hams are salt preserved, meaning that they have been dried in salt. This makes them too salty for most anyone. To get the salt out you need to soak the ham. Consider this a reverse brining. By soaking the salted ham in water you will draw the salt from the meat but also add moisture.

                                  Some people say you need to soak your country ham for about 6 to 12 hours. If you have a small ham, around 4 to 5 pounds this might be okay, but I personally like to soak my ham for a long time, about 2 to 3 days. You want the ham to stay cold while soaking but not as cold as your refrigerator. A cooler works great for this because it gives you the space your need but also keeps the temperature in a more controlled range. Keep the temperature around 40 degrees F. and your ham will be perfect. The temperature isn’t too important but you want it low to keep any bacteria from growing.

                                  As the soaking pulls the salt from the ham you will want to change the water about every 12 hours. This gets the salt out of the way and allows more to come out. When you change the water you should also give the ham a quick rinse to get any salt off the surface. The soaking will rehydrate the ham and make it better to eat.

                                  Once you have soaked your country ham you can now cook it. While the ham is ready to eat already the soaking process may have exposed the ham to bacteria so cooking it at this point is important. You will want to cook your ham at a low temperature low enough to get the internal temperature up to 160 degrees F. While roasting it in the oven is fine the added flavor you get from a smoker or grill makes a much better ham.

                                  If you put your ham on a grill you will want to cook it indirectly at a low temperature. I would suggest putting a pan of water under the ham to catch any drippings, but more importantly to keep the cooking environment moist. You should also baste your ham periodically to prevent it from drying out. A good baste for a country ham should be sweet and acidic. Dr. Pepper works great for hams, honest. At a low grilling temperature of about 300 degrees F. you should have your ham finished in about 3 to 4 hours. Watch carefully to avoid burning. A country ham can be forgiving but letting it burn up on the grill is unforgivable.

                                  If you are going to smoke your country ham, keep the smoke levels low. A country ham typically already has a smoky flavor to it. Adding too much smoke can make it bitter. Baste frequently and keep the temperature around 250 degrees F. for 5 to 6 hours. Of course you can go longer but the benefit of smoking declines over time.

                                  You might have noticed that this process takes time. Plan on starting out with your country ham 3 days before you need it. Yes, it is something of a project but well worth the effort and the actual time spent on it is not very much. You’ll have plenty of time to prepare other items for your Holiday feast."

                                   
                                  #17
                                    rjb

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                                    • Location: Bronxville, NY
                                    RE: Col. Newsome's Country Ham Tue, 11/6/07 2:52 PM (permalink)
                                    I've liked the dry cured hams from Newsom and Nancy, aka The Ham Lady is very nice. However, the one time I strayed and got a "city ham," which they call a "Preacher Ham.," it was dreadful. Dried out, stringy and tasting of stale barbecue smoke. IMHO, stick to the country hams and take the time to prepare them correctly. If you don't have the time or patience required, get a city ham.

                                     
                                    #18
                                      RibRater

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                                      RE: Col. Newsome's Country Ham Tue, 11/6/07 6:23 PM (permalink)
                                      pogophiles, my last sentence above was:

                                      I understand that the hams you've been exposed to did not need to be soaked...but that's not the norm in country hams.


                                      I'm not familiar with Broadbents products and I don't know what exact product you purchased from them but whether you agree or not doesn't change the generally accepted form of preparing country hams. 15 minutes of research online will tell you all you really need to know.




                                      BTW, Here are the instructions from broadbent on cooking their "uncooked" country ham:

                                      # Wash the ham thoroughly and scrub off any mold with a stiff brush. Trim off any dark, hard edges. Soak the ham 24 hours in plain water to which has been added one cup of vinegar and on cup of brown sugar.

                                      # For persons who are salt conscious or on salt limited diets we recommend soaking the ham in plain water for 24 hours, then pour off water and rinse ham. Place ham in fresh water for an additional 24 hours to which has been added one-cup vinegar and one-cup brown sugar.

                                      # If you want to use the hock for seasoning or soup, cut off before cooking.

                                      # Remove ham from water and rinse when ready to cook. Line a deep pan such as a roaster with heavy-duty aluminum foil. Place ham with skin side down into this pan. Be sure that you do not puncture the foil. Add 1 quart of water. Place on top of the ham evenly 1-11/4 cups of brown sugar. Completely seal ham, sugar and water by double folding foil down tight.

                                      # Place in a cold oven. Cook at 325-350 degrees until a meat thermometer registers an internal temperature of 160-165 degrees. This will take about 16-22 minutes per pound for whole hams. Using a thermometer takes the guesswork out of the cooking time. Insert the thermometer through foil so that the bulb reaches the center of the ham and does not touch either bone or fat.

                                      # Remove ham and take off skin and trim fat to ¼-3/8 inch thick.

                                      # Glaze with your favorite glaze. We recommend equal parts of brown sugar and honey.

                                      # Brown glaze by putting ham in a 450-degree pre-heated oven for 7 minutes or until golden brown.





                                       
                                      #19
                                        Hillbilly

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                                        RE: Col. Newsome's Country Ham Tue, 11/6/07 6:35 PM (permalink)
                                        quote:
                                        Originally posted by pogophiles

                                        OK, I went and looked at the instructions on the Smithfield website and the only cooking methods it mentions are for baking or boiling the ham. I agree that if you are baking or boiling the ham you need to soak it. However, if you are cutting the ham into slices and frying it (which is the cooking method I am referring to in all my commentary above) you do not need to soak it first. You can, but it is not necessary.


                                        I'm with you, Pogo! It is a total waste to bake or boil a country ham. The smell of frying it in a cast iron skillet is nearly as intense as eating it (along with biscuits lightly soaked with red eye gravy and topped with some "cream" gravy).

                                        I buy mine from "Hobe's Hams" in North Wilkesboro, NC. Most of his product is packaged for Bojangles, and I like to get a 2 pound package of center slices and a few slices with more fat for good red eye gravy.

                                        I still remember helping my dad hand rub the salt and pepper mixture into pork hams and shoulders before hanging them in burlap sacks to cure for at least 6 months, usually a year. We only scraped the salt crust off before slicing the ham for the frying. We NEVER would have wasted any of this delicious meat by baking or boiling. And we would never soak away any of that great flavor.
                                         
                                        #20
                                          Hillbilly

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                                          RE: Col. Newsome's Country Ham Tue, 11/6/07 8:24 PM (permalink)
                                          Does anyone reading this ever really bake or boil country ham?

                                          I have lived in the middle of country ham territory (the North Carolina mountains) for more than 60 years, and have never seen nor heard of anyone around here preparing country ham except by frying slices. All of the restaurants within 50 miles have country ham on the menu, and none of them would ever consider serving it any way other than as fried slices.

                                          It is simply not meant to be baked or boiled, except by the people who are trying to sell more of it.
                                           
                                          #21
                                            RibRater

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                                            RE: Col. Newsome's Country Ham Tue, 11/6/07 8:28 PM (permalink)
                                            quote:
                                            Originally posted by Hillbilly

                                            Does anyone reading this ever really bake or boil country ham?

                                            I have lived in the middle of country ham territory (the North Carolina mountains) for more than 60 years, and have never seen nor heard of anyone around here preparing country ham except by frying slices. All of the restaurants within 50 miles have country ham on the menu, and none of them would ever consider serving it any way other than as fried slices.

                                            It is simply not meant to be baked or boiled, except by the people who are trying to sell more of it.




                                            I've seen literally hundreds of baked country hams on southern tables in my lifetime. Slicing and frying was what you did with extra ham...not a whole cured ham.


                                             
                                            #22
                                              douginvirginia

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                                              RE: Col. Newsome's Country Ham Wed, 11/7/07 7:59 AM (permalink)
                                              quote:
                                              Originally posted by Larry - RibRater - Jay

                                              quote:
                                              Originally posted by Hillbilly

                                              Does anyone reading this ever really bake or boil country ham?

                                              I have lived in the middle of country ham territory (the North Carolina mountains) for more than 60 years, and have never seen nor heard of anyone around here preparing country ham except by frying slices. All of the restaurants within 50 miles have country ham on the menu, and none of them would ever consider serving it any way other than as fried slices.

                                              It is simply not meant to be baked or boiled, except by the people who are trying to sell more of it.




                                              I've seen literally hundreds of baked country hams on southern tables in my lifetime. Slicing and frying was what you did with extra ham...not a whole cured ham.





                                              I'm with Larry here. Also being from ham country, we have always had it both ways, but I would never slice one the hams I cure (only one per year). We usually soak for 2 days then bake (with liquid - I use water and Dr. Pepper) a ham about 10 days before Christmas and have it cold throughout the holiday season. I should add that my hams are 2 years old.

                                              That said, the fellow who I butcher with always keeps a whole hog and thus has 2 hams each year. He slices one for breakfast use, and bakes one.

                                              I love fried, sliced ham for breakfast - there's no better egg than one fried in ham grease. I buy slices from a ham guy across the mountain for this purpose. His are less salty and require no soaking.

                                              So, bottom line is there are really no "rules". But back to some of the early posts, I have NEVER heard of bacon which needed soaking. If there's such a thing, I feel it's been left on the cure too long.

                                               
                                              #23
                                                edwmax

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                                                RE: Col. Newsome's Country Ham Thu, 11/8/07 10:42 AM (permalink)
                                                quote:
                                                Originally posted by douginvirginia

                                                .....
                                                So, bottom line is there are really no "rules". But back to some of the early posts, I have NEVER heard of bacon which needed soaking. If there's such a thing, I feel it's been left on the cure too long.




                                                It's called "Salt Pork". This is usually too salty for those that are salt tolerant. As stated before above, some people are more salt tolerant than others. What maybe eatable by some, may not be eatable by others and the way too remove the salt is too wash it off and/or soak the meat.
                                                 
                                                #24
                                                  douginvirginia

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                                                  RE: Col. Newsome's Country Ham Fri, 11/9/07 6:53 AM (permalink)
                                                  quote:
                                                  Originally posted by edwmax

                                                  quote:
                                                  Originally posted by douginvirginia

                                                  .....
                                                  So, bottom line is there are really no "rules". But back to some of the early posts, I have NEVER heard of bacon which needed soaking. If there's such a thing, I feel it's been left on the cure too long.




                                                  It's called "Salt Pork". This is usually too salty for those that are salt tolerant. As stated before above, some people are more salt tolerant than others. What maybe eatable by some, may not be eatable by others and the way too remove the salt is too wash it off and/or soak the meat.
                                                   
                                                  #25
                                                    douginvirginia

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                                                    RE: Col. Newsome's Country Ham Fri, 11/9/07 7:02 AM (permalink)
                                                    quote:
                                                    Originally posted by edwmax

                                                    quote:
                                                    Originally posted by douginvirginia

                                                    .....
                                                    So, bottom line is there are really no "rules". But back to some of the early posts, I have NEVER heard of bacon which needed soaking. If there's such a thing, I feel it's been left on the cure too long.






                                                    It's called "Salt Pork". This is usually too salty for those that are salt tolerant. As stated before above, some people are more salt tolerant than others. What maybe eatable by some, may not be eatable by others and the way too remove the salt is too wash it off and/or soak the meat.


                                                    That's probably what we call "side meat" around here. Used primarily for seasoning greens and beans. It's left on the cure longer than the sides we use for bacon which we only keep on for a week before giving them to old Mr. Fox, the last guy around here whole still does the smoking.

                                                    Regional terminology aside, we got a lot of ham lovers here.

                                                     
                                                    #26
                                                      edwmax

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                                                      RE: Col. Newsome's Country Ham Fri, 11/9/07 8:48 AM (permalink)
                                                      Just two weeks ago, a restaurant in Bainbridge, Ga. had a pile of crisp fried salt pork on their lunch buffet. It had a slight salty taste, so the salt crust had been washed off and most likely soaked before cooking. But the fried pork was gooood. The cook knew what he was doing.

                                                      Also, years ago, I saw an Atlanta restaurant make their white gravy for biscuits and gravy by frying smoked salt pork for the base. The crisp fried pieces were available to the customers.

                                                      Salt Pork, side meat or very salty bacon (regional terminology aside) this type of meat is available by design and not just an accident when curing.

                                                      Yes, we got a lot of ham lovers here and some bacon lovers too.
                                                       
                                                      #27
                                                        Striperguy

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                                                        RE: Col. Newsome's Country Ham Tue, 12/9/08 2:06 PM (permalink)
                                                        I've only had Colonel Newsom's country hams and it is one of the most incredible food products I have ever tasted.

                                                        I was curious to try a Broadbent ham for comparison sake.

                                                        I slice Newsom's about 1/4" thick, pan fry, and make red eye gravy. It is incredible. Salty yes, but incredible. In my mind it would be a waste to bake that ham.

                                                        I do occasionally use it to flavor other dishes as well. I have done Chinese style string beans with slivers of ham... amazing.

                                                        I also made 14 bean and cabbage soup with the bones of my most recent ham. Full of flavor.

                                                        For those who remember, Smithfield used to make decent country hams, but they no longer age them any appreciable period of time so those hams are now bland and not particularly worth the fuss.

                                                        I recently decided to try one of Newsom's fancier hams... I had a free-range ham that was aged 18 months (normal aging is 6-12 months).

                                                        The product was even more pungent and tangy then their other hams. It was too much for some of my friends, but I loved it all the more.

                                                        On a Newsom's ham, sometimes there are pieces that are very dry. I have found you can eat those, or really any part of the ham, raw, like a fine prosciutto or Spanish Jamon Serrano. That said, I am curious to try a Broadbent ham.
                                                         
                                                        #28
                                                          iqdiva

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                                                          RE: Col. Newsome's Country Ham Tue, 12/9/08 2:22 PM (permalink)
                                                          quote:
                                                          Originally posted by edwmax

                                                          Just a note for those that don't know, and most folks don't. Old style Aged Country ham and bacon is very salty and dry. This was how the meat was preserved without refrigeration. This meat was intended to be used as seasoning meat in greens and beans and no additional or very little salt was added to the pot.

                                                          To cook the country or bacon as side meat, it is necessary to soak the meat to remove some or ALL of the salt before cooking. Also, the soaking adds water back to the meat so it wouldn’t be dry after cooking. The cooking directions given above in the link is correct. But note the step about the soaking of the meat. Don’t skip that step and it may take longer that 30 min., depends on your taste.

                                                          To make Red Eye Gravy, after frying put the country ham back into the pan and add a cup or more of water and let simmer a few minutes.

                                                          A lot of today’s so called country ham or bacon is made with a lot less salt. But these products or kept under refrigeration and doesn’t compare with the true aged Country hams or bacons.

                                                          Poverty Pete the bacon that you threw out just needed a soak before cooking. That bacon might have been some of the best bacon you’ve every had.



                                                          When , I was a little girl ( 40-50 years ago ) in S.E. Alabama , quite a few local farmers and meat markets dry cured country ham , bacon & jowl . My grandfather did as well . Mama would always soak the hams ( sliced or not ) and bacon before she cooked with them . The jowls would often be added to vegetables or soup with out soaking . These meat products had real old-time deep Southern flavor that is extremely hard to find nowadays. I miss that taste from my childhood and heritage ...I loved it so much !
                                                           
                                                          #29
                                                            Greymo

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                                                            RE: Col. Newsome's Country Ham Tue, 12/9/08 4:06 PM (permalink)
                                                            I am so glad to get the advice on soaking the bacon. I bought quite a few pounds of Smithfield dry cured bacon as it seemed like such a good deal. It turned out to be so salty that I have been using it only for seasoning in dishes.

                                                            I am anxious to try soaking it and see what the family thinks. Thanks for the information.
                                                             
                                                            #30
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