Condimentia

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yumbo
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2004/04/16 18:56:30 (permalink)

Condimentia

Hi All -

I'm a sucker for condiments and I'm trying to get rid of some condiments in my pantry - or at least learn some new recipes so that I start making a dent in my collection. Here's my question - what is Worcester Sauce good for, besides boiled corned beef? I love the stuff, but what can I do with it?

Gratefully,

Yumbo
#1

29 Replies Related Threads

    Michael Stern
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    RE: Condimentia 2004/04/16 19:12:55 (permalink)
    Put a dash of it in your bloody Mary.
    #2
    emmymom
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    RE: Condimentia 2004/04/16 19:17:17 (permalink)
    This is one of my standards - I invented it, so it doesn't have a name - let's call it "Ground Beef with Worcestershire Gravy". Almost posted this on the "quick meals" thread the other day. It's one of my standards when I don't know what to cook and don't want to spend much time doing it. It uses a lot of worcestershire sauce, which I'm always running out of consequently.

    Put a frozen chunk of ground beef (about 1/4 lb.) in a small-to-medium sized frying pan and add 1 cup water. (No need to defrost the meat.) Coarsely chop an onion and add to pan, along with a minced clove of garlic (or about 1/4 tsp. of garlic powder.) Cover and cook over medium high heat, scraping off and breaking up the now-cooked meat every couple of minutes until it's all defrosted. In the meantime, mix together about 1 T. of flour, 1 T. of sugar, and about 1/4 cup of worcestershire sauce to make a "slurry" (about the texture of thin ketchup.) When meat is defrosted and broken up, add the slurry to the meat mixture and stir to form a gravy. Turn the heat down to simmer and put on some rice to cook. When the rice is done, butter it and serve the meat gravy on top.
    Serves one.

    It's kind of a sweet-and-sour taste. Never served it to another human, so I'm curious to see if anyone likes it but me. It always seemed kinda low rent to serve to anyone else, but I love it!
    #3
    1bbqboy
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    RE: Condimentia 2004/04/16 19:30:05 (permalink)
    Hey yumbo, long time no see. Cool! culture shock from moving from the NW to Great Lakes? I use worcestershire sauce
    like a soy sauce. It has a lot of the same properties. Makes a great base for a marinade. Add 2/1 of it and vinegar based hot sauce + ginger and garlic.. or red chili oil if you are the daring type.
    good stuff. ... or, Cook vegetables in it.. Add it to Hamburgers, along with an egg, green peppers ,onions, and Garlic.
    Check this out:
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/herefordandworcester/culture/2002/02/lea_perrins.shtml
    That said, I'll buy anything that smacks of condiments. The thing I wish for most is Green tomato Ketchup, made by a lady up in Grant's Pass who no longer sells at our farmer's markets. I'm Bummed! It was like nothing I've tasted before, but I haven't been able to duplicate it either.

    #4
    yumbo
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    RE: Condimentia 2004/04/16 20:44:21 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by bill voss

    Hey yumbo, long time no see. Cool! culture shock from moving from the NW to Great Lakes? I use worcestershire sauce
    like a soy sauce. It has a lot of the same properties. Makes a great base for a marinade. Add 2/1 of it and vinegar based hot sauce + ginger and garlic.. or red chili oil if you are the daring type.
    good stuff. ... or, Cook vegetables in it.. Add it to Hamburgers, along with an egg, green peppers ,onions, and Garlic.
    Check this out:
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/herefordandworcester/culture/2002/02/lea_perrins.shtml
    That said, I'll buy anything that smacks of condiments. The thing I wish for most is Green tomato Ketchup, made by a lady up in Grant's Pass who no longer sells at our farmer's markets. I'm Bummed! It was like nothing I've tasted before, but I haven't been able to duplicate it either.


    Hey there. 'Tis good to be back. As for moving from Seattle to Milwaukee, my biggest impression is that the good people of Wisconsin seem to be more grounded. Their roots run deep. It seems most of them were born here, and they'll probably die here. I'm more used to the transient feel of west coasters.

    Green tomato ketchup. Now that's got to be different.

    Another Worcestershire Sauce question - the only one I've ever tried is Lea and Perrins. Are there superior brands out there?

    -Yumbo
    #5
    Cakes
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    RE: Condimentia 2004/04/16 21:17:13 (permalink)
    Yumbo,

    If you think Seattle is transient, you ought to experience Florida! You are absolutely right about the people in Wisconsin being grounded. It is actually a consideration when you thinking about hiring someone.

    Cakes
    #6
    1bbqboy
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    RE: Condimentia 2004/04/16 21:56:24 (permalink)
    French's is good, but not as salty (less anchovies?); It works
    for recipes because you don't end up oversalty. I've been less pleased with other brands.
    http://www.frenchsfoods.com/worcestershire-sauce/index.asp
    #7
    felix4067
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    RE: Condimentia 2004/04/17 01:25:03 (permalink)
    I use Worcestershire in most of my beef marinades, as well as pouring some over any beef (especially burgers) I'm grilling or broiling. It's also good on baked potatoes underneath the sour cream. Or in some salad dressings (and I'll be darned if I can think of a one at the moment, figures). I make a bleu cheese/walnut/chive spread that uses it.

    Lea and Perrins is ok, but I usually end up with French's. Lea and Perrins makes the best steak sauce IMO, but I haven't been overly impressed with anything else of theirs. It's not bad, it's just kinda "take it or leave it" to me.
    #8
    6star
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    RE: Condimentia 2004/04/17 01:27:16 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by bill voss

    The thing I wish for most is Green tomato Ketchup, made by a lady up in Grant's Pass who no longer sells at our farmer's markets. I'm Bummed! It was like nothing I've tasted before, but I haven't been able to duplicate it either.



    Have you tried making it with either of these recipes? (They both would definitely have to be cut way down in volume.)
    http://www.recipeland.com/g/green_tomato_catsup.html
    http://members.aol.com/urrgghh/green.html
    The second URL has some other green tomato recipes also.
    #9
    Michael Hoffman
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    RE: Condimentia 2004/04/17 11:20:03 (permalink)
    I buy Angostura, which is much lower in sodium. I like their soy sauce, too.
    #10
    RVlifestyle
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    RE: Condimentia 2004/04/18 23:18:56 (permalink)
    I put a little Lea and Perrins in my scrambled eggs or omelets. Gives em just a little kick.
    #11
    yumbo
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    RE: Condimentia 2004/04/19 08:34:25 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by RVlifestyle

    I put a little Lea and Perrins in my scrambled eggs or omelets. Gives em just a little kick.

    Ooooh. Guess what I'm having for breakfast tomorrow! Thanks.
    #12
    Willly
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    RE: Condimentia 2004/04/19 10:13:19 (permalink)
    Put more than a dash in your bloody mary. Try making a bloody with about a tablespoon of Lea and Perrins -- you'll be amazed at the difference. I'm now famous for my bloodies, and only buy Worchestershire at Costco, where it is cheap because I use so much...
    #13
    Hode
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    RE: Condimentia 2004/04/19 11:51:17 (permalink)
    If you want lower salt you can do as my friend does, he uses powdered worcestershire. All the flavor without the sodium.
    #14
    emsmom
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    RE: Condimentia 2004/04/21 13:25:09 (permalink)
    I like the Frenchs brand better than L & P. This is one condiment that I am never without. I use it in cooking beef. My daughter likes to sprinkle or pour it over her hamburger steak, pork chops, etc.
    I use it in my barbecue sauce and especally during the holidays, I have to have it for party mix along with onion and garlic powder and also I like to do toasted pecans in the same manner as my party mix.
    I like to sprinkle it over roast pork or roast beef and eat the meat with chow chow
    quote:
    Originally posted by bill voss

    French's is good, but not as salty (less anchovies?); It works
    for recipes because you don't end up oversalty. I've been less pleased with other brands.
    http://www.frenchsfoods.com/worcestershire-sauce/index.asp

    #15
    lleechef
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    RE: Condimentia 2004/04/21 13:52:59 (permalink)
    L&P in it's raw state (out of the bottle) I do not like. But it's essential for bloody marys, my Desperado sauce (BBQ), London broil marinade, gumbo, etouffee, etc.
    #16
    Rhodes
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    RE: Condimentia 2004/04/21 13:56:04 (permalink)
    I made a great quick chicken marinade recently: lea & perrins, chipotle tabasco sauce, Old bay seasoning, enough to moisten and lightly coat all the chicken, left it for several hours, it was great! I also add it at random to many soups, veggie sautés, as well as to taco filling and fajita-type things and mayo-based salad dressings and dips....
    #17
    1bbqboy
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    RE: Condimentia 2004/04/21 18:43:44 (permalink)
    OK, I give. what's the formula for Desperado BBQ sauce? Is It tomato based? Can you pour it in the bloody marys?
    #18
    lleechef
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    RE: Condimentia 2004/04/21 20:15:25 (permalink)
    Monsieur Voss, here in lies the secret (shhhhhhhhhh) recipe for Desperado Sauce.....created by me and my former Jewish sous chef. Oy vey, what a combo. But the sauce works........it's neither vinaigry (like NC) nor sweet (like New England) but it definately has a kick. I just emailed the formula to Bushie today, since he taught a Yankee girl how to "properly" cook beans! Now, remember, I hardly ever measure anything. So you can scale up or down depending on what you're making. I don't see anything in the ingredients that I would NOT throw in a bloody mary! Here we go:
    32 oz. ketchup
    1/4 C Lee & Perrins
    1/2 C A-1 sauce
    1/4 C fresh squeezed lime juice (lemon on default)
    3 T Dijon mustard
    2 T chopped garlic
    1/2 C pureed chipotles in adobo
    2 T white vinegar

    Whisk all the ingredients together. Baste on whatever you're cookin.
    Add more or less chipotles to taste.
    #19
    JaneDough
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    RE: Condimentia 2004/04/21 23:55:12 (permalink)
    "Condimentia." Interesting title... any relation to CondiRice?
    #20
    1bbqboy
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    RE: Condimentia 2004/05/03 13:37:31 (permalink)
    Now here is a dish that has worchestershire:
    soft shell cicadas...live!
    http://www.npr.org/display_pages/features/feature_1866011.html
    #21
    Jennifer_4
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    RE: Condimentia 2004/05/03 13:40:27 (permalink)
    I use it in every ground beef or ground turkey dish I make. My father also used it as the "secret" ingredient in his cream gravy..
    #22
    renfrew
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    RE: Condimentia 2004/05/03 13:50:07 (permalink)
    Great suggestions so far...

    I live Biologique, or Eden brand Worcesteshire in addition to L&P. Annie's has a pretty good vegetarian version as well.

    Funny thing is, I have a ton of uses for it the one exception being boiled corned beef...
    #23
    Maynerd
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    RE: Condimentia 2004/05/03 13:54:43 (permalink)
    My mom had a ground beef casserole recipe that as I recall had:

    layer of ground beef
    layer of sliced potato
    layer of onion and
    layer of carrot.
    Repeat, and put Worchester sauce on top and let the sauce
    work it's way down through to the bottom. It was good!
    #24
    yumbo
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    RE: Condimentia 2004/05/03 14:16:52 (permalink)
    Hey -

    I made an interesting dipping sauce to go with a batch of potstickers recently, using Worcestershire Sauce. I don't remember the exact proportions, so you'll have to wing it a little:

    1/4 cup soy sauce
    2-3 cloves garlic, thinly sliced
    1 green onion, thinly sliced
    1 T Worcestershire
    1 T sugar
    1 t vinegar
    Tabasco or other hot sauce to taste.

    -Yumbo
    #25
    Rex Allen
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    RE: Condimentia 2004/05/03 14:17:18 (permalink)
    Yo Maynard,
    #26
    Rex Allen
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    RE: Condimentia 2004/05/03 14:20:39 (permalink)
    Yo Maynard,
    That sounded so good I am going to make it for dinner tonight. Keep up the good work! Rex in Hot expensive San Diego. Thank the Gods for Air Conditioning!
    #27
    Maynerd
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    RE: Condimentia 2004/05/03 15:05:45 (permalink)
    Good luck with it Rex. Every time I tried to make it it was never as good as my mom's, but that's to be expected I suppose.

    I think she browned the meat, didn't cook it all the way through, before she put it in the casserole dish. I like lots of potatos and onions and fewer carrots, but I think you can put as much or as little as you like.

    i like my veggies soft when in a casserole, so I slice them pretty thin.
    #28
    dbear
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    RE: Condimentia 2004/05/03 16:36:47 (permalink)
    I have always really liked worcestershire sauce. My father and uncle always used angostura, but both L & P and French's are good also. Since childhood I have used the straight liquid as a 'dip' for grilled cheese sandwiches. There is a classic 3 Stooges routine about how to pronounce the name. Anyone else remember that?
    db
    #29
    MissKitty
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    RE: Condimentia 2004/05/06 08:06:43 (permalink)
    It gives a kick to almost anything meat based but goes especially well with all kinds of beef. Its used a lot here in the UK for adding to sheperds pie, gravy, casseroles, stews etc. Its great for drizzling onto grilled or barbecued meats - you can use it for marinades but just straight is fine. Also another top British use for it is a dash of it in Welsh Rarebit - top quality cheese, butter, touch of mustard and either a little milk or ale, mixed and melted gently together and served on hot toast either as is or whizzed under the grill ( broiler )until brown and bubbling. Or in cheese on toast -not made like the US grilled cheese , toast one side of the bread, butter untoasted side, add grated or sliced cheese ( and Worcestershire sauce ! ) and back under the grill until melty golden brown. MMMM !
    #30
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