Cooking with a woodstove.

Author
Prof
Junior Burger
  • Total Posts : 41
  • Joined: 2000/07/28 12:52:00
  • Location: ,
  • Status: offline
2012/12/08 08:18:27 (permalink)

Cooking with a woodstove.

Here in the North Country of NY State, lots of us have woodstoves as main or supplemental heat in our homes. I have been experimenting with using the woodstove instead of my kitchen stove/oven for cooking.  I preheat water on it and have used the edges for warming up leftovers.  I have baked a small loaf of bread on top and did the pizza last night.  You have to guard against spills on the woodstove since they will stain the iron.  It's also harder to control the temperature but still doable if you are careful.  I have considered getting firebrick and buiding a brick oven on top of the stove but am trying simpler means first. A heavy cast iron pot turned upside down makes a small oven.  Last night I put a pizza stone on the top and let it get hot.  Made the pizza and put it on parchment paper to prevent dripping onto the stove top.  Put the pizza on the stone and covered it with a conventional large stainless steel lid.  The fire had burned down some and was not super hot.  After 20 minutes the bottom crust was pretty nice but starting to burn in small spots and the cheese was melted but the top layer of dough was very soft and undercooked.  Not wanting it to burn, I removed it to a wooden cutting board and left the lid on it.  The residual heat eventually cooked the dough thru. Next time I will try to make the pizza small enough to fit under my cast iron pot. Anyone else cook on or in their woodstove?
dave
#1

13 Replies Related Threads

    kozel
    Double Cheeseburger
    • Total Posts : 827
    • Joined: 2004/07/17 10:18:00
    • Location: Fredericksburg, VA
    • Status: offline
    Re:Cooking with a woodstove. 2012/12/08 09:11:01 (permalink)
    We have 2 coal stoves in the house that used to see a lot more use.  We lose power and we'll also lose our heat and cooking capability so the first sign of power issues in winter the wife always puts up a pot of soup in the stove in the den.  Recently during 'Sandy' it was cold enough that we started up one stove for a few days as we lost power for about a week.  Didn't use it for cooking put we did keep a pot of water on the stove for washing dishes. What's nice about anthracite is that it keeps indefinitely.  We stopped burning coal regularly about 6-8 years ago but what remains of the 3 ton delivery just sits in a bin outside to be used whenever we need it.  Sorry I don't have more stories of a cooking nature.
    #2
    edwmax
    Double Chili Cheeseburger
    • Total Posts : 2087
    • Joined: 2007/01/01 15:42:00
    • Location: Cairo, GA
    • Status: offline
    Re:Cooking with a woodstove. 2012/12/08 13:04:07 (permalink)
    Not sure why your pizza crust was under done if the veggies were cooked and the cheese melted.     ... Well, may because of no 'top heat'; or the crust was thick.   Anyway, using the same method, try precooking the crust, turn over and cook the other side.  Then load the pizza and cook the toppings.   ... Of course the meat(s) should already be cooked too.
    ... I always pre-cook my crust, as I like crispy ... not thick & chewy.
    #3
    Prof
    Junior Burger
    • Total Posts : 41
    • Joined: 2000/07/28 12:52:00
    • Location: ,
    • Status: offline
    Re:Cooking with a woodstove. 2012/12/08 16:54:30 (permalink)
    Thanks for the very good tip, edwmax.  That really makes sense. 
    dave
    #4
    edwmax
    Double Chili Cheeseburger
    • Total Posts : 2087
    • Joined: 2007/01/01 15:42:00
    • Location: Cairo, GA
    • Status: offline
    Re:Cooking with a woodstove. 2012/12/08 18:22:06 (permalink)
    This got me hunger for a pizza.   I don't have a wood stove, so I used the NuWave.   Drizzled Olive old on the crust and baked (nu wave) for 10 min.  Then built the pizza, then cooked for 15 min.   The edge were just starting to brown and were crisp.  The cheese had brown streaks showing; and the green pepper was hot and almost tender (dente ?).   ... It would have been prefect if haven't forgotten the pepperoni.   ... Anyway I wasn't going the throw it out to make another.   ... it was good! ... ... so I'm sure the wood stove will work too.
    #5
    Prof
    Junior Burger
    • Total Posts : 41
    • Joined: 2000/07/28 12:52:00
    • Location: ,
    • Status: offline
    Re:Cooking with a woodstove. 2012/12/08 19:10:05 (permalink)
    Hey Kozel,
    We were undergoing winter survival training and were camped in a tent in the snow at Ft. Drum at 28 below zero F, trying to keep a coal stove working.  The stove would get so hot you could not get near it and then we would be fighting to keep it lit.  Never did figure it out.    I like wood much better.
    dave
    #6
    Route 11
    Double Cheeseburger
    • Total Posts : 755
    • Joined: 2003/05/28 11:17:00
    • Location: Howardsville, VA
    • Status: offline
    Re:Cooking with a woodstove. 2012/12/08 19:50:54 (permalink)
    My mother did when I was small. A good Dutch oven is all you need for beans. You can just make white beans and pork or bake them with molassas right on the cooktop.
     
    When the power would go out (happened a lot where we lived) she would fry hot dogs and onions in a cast iron pan. Once we tried to make popcorn in one of those long handled poppers but that was a miserable failure. 
     
    The stove came in really handy when we lived in the mountains. Beef stew and cocoa always taste better with a little woodsmoke in them.
    #7
    kozel
    Double Cheeseburger
    • Total Posts : 827
    • Joined: 2004/07/17 10:18:00
    • Location: Fredericksburg, VA
    • Status: offline
    Re:Cooking with a woodstove. 2012/12/09 08:42:16 (permalink)
    David Guccione
    Hey Kozel,
    We were undergoing winter survival training and were camped in a tent in the snow at Ft. Drum at 28 below zero F, trying to keep a coal stove working.  The stove would get so hot you could not get near it and then we would be fighting to keep it lit.  Never did figure it out.    I like wood much better.
    dave

    Anthracite stoves are difficult to get used to; hard to start and hard to keep going.  Once you get the knack, you're a convert. Coal users pride themselves on getting into the one match club. Lighting the fire with one match and keeping it going all season.  We used to go skiing for the day in the Catskills (from Long Island) and return to a going coal fire if you banked it just right.  Then there's the problem of ash disposal.  You'd be surprised how mush ash is produced by a coal stove.  For the ins and outs of burning coal, visit the forum....
    http://nepacrossroads.com/
    I used to visit Camp Drum in the summer back int the 70's to fire 155mm towed howitzers from the 187th out of Brooklyn.  If I remember correctly, you have 2 seasons, winter and the 4th of July.
    #8
    kevincad
    Cheeseburger
    • Total Posts : 408
    • Joined: 2008/01/23 16:30:00
    • Location: Snellville, GA
    • Status: offline
    Re:Cooking with a woodstove. 2012/12/09 09:13:29 (permalink)
    edwmax

    This got me hunger for a pizza.   I don't have a wood stove, so I used the NuWave.   Drizzled Olive old on the crust and baked (nu wave) for 10 min.  Then built the pizza, then cooked for 15 min.   The edge were just starting to brown and were crisp.  The cheese had brown streaks showing; and the green pepper was hot and almost tender (dente ?).   ... It would have been prefect if haven't forgotten the pepperoni.   ... Anyway I wasn't going the throw it out to make another.   ... it was good! ... ... so I'm sure the wood stove will work too.

    Tell me more about the NuWave, how do you like it?
    #9
    Prof
    Junior Burger
    • Total Posts : 41
    • Joined: 2000/07/28 12:52:00
    • Location: ,
    • Status: offline
    Re:Cooking with a woodstove. 2012/12/09 12:37:51 (permalink)
    kozel

    David Guccione
    Hey Kozel,

    Anthracite stoves are difficult to get used to; hard to start and hard to keep going.  Once you get the knack, you're a convert. Coal users pride themselves on getting into the one match club. Lighting the fire with one match and keeping it going all season.  We used to go skiing for the day in the Catskills (from Long Island) and return to a going coal fire if you banked it just right.  Then there's the problem of ash disposal.  You'd be surprised how mush ash is produced by a coal stove.  For the ins and outs of burning coal, visit the forum....

    I used to visit Camp Drum in the summer back int the 70's to fire 155mm towed howitzers from the 187th out of Brooklyn.  If I remember correctly, you have 2 seasons, winter and the 4th of July.

    Kozel, Ft. D probably now has more population than city of Watertown.  Four infantry brigades and support.\dave
    #10
    drummagick
    Cheeseburger
    • Total Posts : 171
    • Joined: 2005/01/26 14:19:00
    • Location: Wenatchee, WA
    • Status: offline
    Re:Cooking with a woodstove. 2012/12/09 15:45:29 (permalink)
    When my kids were little we had a double wall woodstove in a mobile home.  Lost power for a week in late December one year after an ice and windstorm.  I was so desperate for cinnamon rolls one day I baked them in the woodstove.  This can be done with enough heavy duty aluminum foil.  :D
     
    The stove was good for heating canned foods on top, but that was about it.
    #11
    SeamusD
    Double Chili Cheeseburger
    • Total Posts : 1006
    • Joined: 2008/04/01 12:30:00
    • Location: Syracuse, NY
    • Status: offline
    Re:Cooking with a woodstove. 2012/12/10 10:21:07 (permalink)
    I've done chili on my mom's woodstove in an enameled dutch oven, I precooked the meat though. Turned out good, took a long time.
     
    I spent a week in an old cabin on Prince Edward Island some years ago, no electricity or running water (we called the outhouse WW III ). Just an old pump well and an ancient wood stove... an actual stove, not a woodburning stove for heat dual-purposed to cook on. We cooked everything on it, even boiled lobsters. Once we figured it out (with a little help from the owner of the property), it wasn't hard at all to keep it going.
    #12
    edwmax
    Double Chili Cheeseburger
    • Total Posts : 2087
    • Joined: 2007/01/01 15:42:00
    • Location: Cairo, GA
    • Status: offline
    Re:Cooking with a woodstove. 2012/12/10 17:00:22 (permalink)
    kevincad

    edwmax

    This got me hunger for a pizza.   I don't have a wood stove, so I used the NuWave.   Drizzled Olive old on the crust and baked (nu wave) for 10 min.  Then built the pizza, then cooked for 15 min.   The edge were just starting to brown and were crisp.  The cheese had brown streaks showing; and the green pepper was hot and almost tender (dente ?).   ... It would have been prefect if haven't forgotten the pepperoni.   ... Anyway I wasn't going the throw it out to make another.   ... it was good! ... ... so I'm sure the wood stove will work too.

    Tell me more about the NuWave, how do you like it?

     
    It works pretty darn good.   My wife has cooks a couple of 3-4 bone rib roast to just prefect (med rare).  If she used the oven, it would be  overdone.    She had also, cooked a couple of whole chickens and pork roast.
    #13
    scrumptiouschef
    Double Cheeseburger
    • Total Posts : 684
    • Joined: 2005/10/05 00:24:00
    • Location: New Orleans, Louisiana
    • Status: offline
    Re:Cooking with a woodstove. 2012/12/10 23:12:03 (permalink)
    Grew up cooking on a Buck stove insert.It's a mammoth iron apparatus that slides into a fireplace and has blowers on it. We used it to heat an 1800sf basement that was outfitted to live in. We had plenty cast iron and cooked on top of the stove daily.Back then Kentucky winters were brutal.We'd build a fire in November and not let it go out til March. Used hickory wood and coal to stoke it. It made the finest pot roast you ever put in your mouth. Those aluminum bubble Jiffy Pop popcorn things saw heavy use in our household too. Miss that ol Buck.
    #14
    Jump to:
    © 2014 APG vNext Commercial Version 5.1