Depression era recipes

Page: 123 > Showing page 1 of 3
Author
Jimeats
Filet Mignon
  • Total Posts : 3175
  • Joined: 2005/08/15 20:02:00
  • Location: Ipswich Ma
  • Status: offline
2005/08/29 12:57:32 (permalink)

Depression era recipes

Looking for some old depression era recipes and stories. My grand parents carried over into later life many of these dishes that were frugal, nutritous, and tastey. Thanks Chow Jim
#1

70 Replies Related Threads

    UncleVic
    Sirloin
    • Total Posts : 6025
    • Joined: 2003/10/14 14:56:00
    • Location: West Palm Beach, FL
    • Status: offline
    RE: Depression era recipes 2005/08/29 17:59:24 (permalink)
    Late last summer or fall, someone posted a link to scanned cookbooks in some .edu (Or .org or possibly dot com) database. I'll have to do a little digging, but there's a pretty cool link stashed somewhere in this site! They scanned all the old cookbooks they could possibly find.. It's free to use, and there was some intresting reading to go along with the recipes. I'll try to search it out later tonight or early a.m. when I get more time.. Maybe someone here can beat me to it.. (the site is huge)..

    #2
    chezkatie
    Double Chili Cheeseburger
    • Total Posts : 1329
    • Joined: 2001/06/24 11:08:00
    • Location: Baltimore and Florida,
    • Status: offline
    RE: Depression era recipes 2005/08/29 18:14:58 (permalink)
    http://www.foodtimeline.org/fooddecades.html#1930s


    This will give you a good idea of what was popular at this time.
    #3
    Sundancer7
    Fire Safety Admin
    • Total Posts : 13480
    • Joined: 2001/07/18 14:10:00
    • Location: Knoxville, TN,
    • Status: offline
    RE: Depression era recipes 2005/08/29 18:47:48 (permalink)
    My grandfather who is now deceased discussed the depression many times. He did not feel the effects so much as he was a farmer in upper East Tennessee and he literally lived off the land. He owned several hundred acres and worked his ass off. He raised corn and wheat for grain. His garden consisted of many acres. He raised dozens of pigs, many dozen cows for milk and butter and beef, hundreds of free range chickens for eggs and fried chicken, geese for down and ponds that contained unknown kinds of fish.

    He bartered milk, eggs, flour from his wheat and cornmeal for staples such as coffee and sugar.

    He was so far inland that the effects of the depression had no effect on their culinary life.

    Paul E. Smith
    Knoxville, TN
    #4
    Jimeats
    Filet Mignon
    • Total Posts : 3175
    • Joined: 2005/08/15 20:02:00
    • Location: Ipswich Ma
    • Status: offline
    RE: Depression era recipes 2005/08/29 19:05:57 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by UncleVic

    Late last summer or fall, someone posted a link to scanned cookbooks in some .edu (Or .org or possibly dot com) database. I'll have to do a little digging, but there's a pretty cool link stashed somewhere in this site! They scanned all the old cookbooks they could possibly find.. It's free to use, and there was some intresting reading to go along with the recipes. I'll try to search it out later tonight or early a.m. when I get more time.. Maybe someone here can beat me to it.. (the site is huge)..


    Thanks Vic but don't go crazy on my behalf Chow Jim. It appears that katie has found it Great Link Thanks folks Chow Jim
    #5
    emsmom
    Double Cheeseburger
    • Total Posts : 955
    • Joined: 2004/03/23 10:48:00
    • Location: Gastonia, NC
    • Status: offline
    RE: Depression era recipes 2005/08/30 09:10:41 (permalink)
    The one thing I remember my Grandmother talking about was making "Hoover" gravy. It was made with water instead of milk because they could not afford the milk.
    #6
    UncleVic
    Sirloin
    • Total Posts : 6025
    • Joined: 2003/10/14 14:56:00
    • Location: West Palm Beach, FL
    • Status: offline
    RE: Depression era recipes 2005/08/30 10:14:42 (permalink)
    Here's the link I was thinking of: http://digital.lib.msu.edu/projects/cookbooks/html/browse.html

    More online recipes of other sorts here: http://www.roadfood.com/Forums/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=2168
    #7
    efuery
    Double Cheeseburger
    • Total Posts : 630
    • Joined: 2003/12/23 12:31:00
    • Location: Danbury, CT
    • Status: offline
    RE: Depression era recipes 2005/08/30 10:25:17 (permalink)
    Check out this book if you haven't already

    M.K Fisher
    How to cook a wolf
    #8
    ocdreamr
    Double Chili Cheeseburger
    • Total Posts : 1109
    • Joined: 2003/03/12 22:03:00
    • Location: Wilmington, NC
    • Status: offline
    RE: Depression era recipes 2005/08/30 20:00:11 (permalink)
    I remember my Mom talking about the meals her Mother made during the depression. There were 8 kids & the food budget wasn't very big. My Mom said that when they had Stawberry short cake for dinner that's all they had. Not that spongey stuff you see today but a biscuit type of shortbread with sliced strawberries & cream poured over top. Corn was cheap, so they'd make a meal of that. Then there was egg noodles topped with onions fried in butter & stewed tomatoes. These were week night dinners. The meal with meat would be saved for Sunday.
    #9
    Rex
    Cheeseburger
    • Total Posts : 109
    • Joined: 2003/11/06 13:41:00
    • Location: Greensboro, NC
    • Status: offline
    RE: Depression era recipes 2005/08/31 16:27:32 (permalink)
    Jimeats,

    What you are really looking for I bet is a book series called "Foxfire". There are a dozen books (I think) in the series and they talk about food, way of life, cooking, how to's from the turn of the century through the depression. Or how things were done back in the old days. Very interesting series and that would give you the information that you seek. Sometimes you can find e-versions on newsgroups....I found 4 of them. But you can usually get them in the bookstores.
    #10
    Jimeats
    Filet Mignon
    • Total Posts : 3175
    • Joined: 2005/08/15 20:02:00
    • Location: Ipswich Ma
    • Status: offline
    RE: Depression era recipes 2005/09/15 10:27:53 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by Rex

    Jimeats,

    What you are really looking for I bet is a book series called "Foxfire". There are a dozen books (I think) in the series and they talk about food, way of life, cooking, how to's from the turn of the century through the depression. Or how things were done back in the old days. Very interesting series and that would give you the information that you seek. Sometimes you can find e-versions on newsgroups....I found 4 of them. But you can usually get them in the bookstores.
    Just picked up a copy of one of the Foxfire series found it at the Good Will store a nice score for 50 cents. Also found a Kichen aide attachment for making pasta still in the box for 2 bucks sometimes it pays to brouse. Grazie Ciao Jim
    #11
    craigdexter1
    Junior Burger
    • Total Posts : 17
    • Joined: 2005/09/21 20:19:00
    • Location: Imperial, MO
    • Status: offline
    RE: Depression era recipes 2005/09/21 21:07:59 (permalink)
    I remember my Grandpa saying he used to eat alot of potato soup back in the depression.
    #12
    Jimeats
    Filet Mignon
    • Total Posts : 3175
    • Joined: 2005/08/15 20:02:00
    • Location: Ipswich Ma
    • Status: offline
    RE: Depression era recipes 2005/09/22 05:45:09 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by craigdexter1

    I remember my Grandpa saying he used to eat alot of potato soup back in the depression.
    Well Craig it sounds like your Grandad was a gormet before his time. The call it Vishy something or other now don't evan heat it up serve it cold throw in a sprig of parsley and charge $6.95 a bowl for it. Chow Jim
    #13
    Ashphalt
    Double Chili Cheeseburger
    • Total Posts : 1644
    • Joined: 2005/09/14 11:31:00
    • Location: Sharon, MA
    • Status: offline
    RE: Depression era recipes 2005/09/23 13:33:37 (permalink)
    Don't forget that food availability and tastes were much more regional then.

    My New England parents were children of the Depression. Along with potatoes, they loved all the cold-storage or cannable roots (turnips, parsnips, beets, etc.) as well as winter squashes. Of course, baked beans were appropriate for any meal throughout the winter. My Mom still loves Beans on Toast for breakfast.

    Two of their favorite nostalgia dinners we were "treated" to regularly as kids set us apart from the Sloppy Joe and Tuna casserole set of the '60s.

    One was Creamed Salt Cod on Toast. It was always accompanied by the story that the box of Cod used to weigh a whole pound and cost a nickel. We thought the box was cool, but you could never keep it in your room because of the smell.

    The other was Red Flannel Hash. Of course when they had Corned Beef, every bit of a New England Boiled Dinner (potatoes, onions, turnips, parsnips, cabbage) leftover was chopped and supplemented with boiled beets. For authentic flavor, it was fried in an iron pan so the beets formed a rusty crust. And served with a fried egg on top, when available.
    #14
    Willly
    Cheeseburger
    • Total Posts : 396
    • Joined: 2002/07/26 15:34:00
    • Location: Westport, CT
    • Status: offline
    RE: Depression era recipes 2005/09/23 13:48:52 (permalink)
    I remember reading The Grapes of Wrath as a kid, and thinking the hamburger gravy made at the end of the book sounded delicious. I now know it's a real food, but when I was young it sounded exotic. I think the way it was eaten with such appreciation in the book made sound even better...
    #15
    Sandy Eggo
    Cheeseburger
    • Total Posts : 226
    • Joined: 2005/09/07 12:59:00
    • Location: San Diego area, CA
    • Status: offline
    RE: Depression era recipes 2005/09/23 14:57:02 (permalink)
    My grandfather, who was a young man during the depression, found three ways to keep fed. He joined the Army, he learned to fish and hunt, and he tended a garden on his churches property to share the harvest. He lived to be 100 years old. He never went hungry.
    #16
    Sundancer7
    Fire Safety Admin
    • Total Posts : 13480
    • Joined: 2001/07/18 14:10:00
    • Location: Knoxville, TN,
    • Status: offline
    RE: Depression era recipes 2005/09/23 15:32:01 (permalink)
    My grandfather who lived in upper East Tennessee lived on the farm and survived off the farm. I believe they made good use of corn in many ways. I am certain that they made a good deal of liquor in those days and in their own mind, it was perfectly OK. They did not sell it and made it for their own use. I have sampled this and for some of the older posters on this forum, you have read my stories on that.

    Grand dad also worked with the CCC's. This was the Civil Converation Corp. They fed them daily but it was pinto beans, cornbread and potatoes with a little bacon. This was breakfast, lunch and dinner.

    I am sure that it would not be a pleasant place to be around.

    Paul E. Smith
    Knoxville, TN
    #17
    mbrookes
    Double Chili Cheeseburger
    • Total Posts : 1354
    • Joined: 2004/10/08 10:28:00
    • Location: Jackson, MS
    • Status: offline
    RE: Depression era recipes 2005/09/23 16:09:03 (permalink)
    Sundancer7, have you seen any of the work done by the CCC? We have lots of parks and such made by them, and the work is beautiful. There's a small ampitheater in Smith Park in downtown Jackson that is realy nice.
    #18
    Sundancer7
    Fire Safety Admin
    • Total Posts : 13480
    • Joined: 2001/07/18 14:10:00
    • Location: Knoxville, TN,
    • Status: offline
    RE: Depression era recipes 2005/09/23 16:21:28 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by mbrookes

    Sundancer7, have you seen any of the work done by the CCC? We have lots of parks and such made by them, and the work is beautiful. There's a small ampitheater in Smith Park in downtown Jackson that is realy nice.


    What I saw of the CCC,s in upper East Tennessee, it was mostly erosion control. There was a huge amount of it but I saw no evidence of parks or anything like that.

    Paul E. Smith
    Knoxville, TN
    #19
    leethebard
    Sirloin
    • Total Posts : 6254
    • Joined: 2007/08/16 17:35:00
    • Location: brick, NJ
    • Status: offline
    RE: Depression era recipes 2008/01/18 19:48:31 (permalink)
    Hi my mom has a recipe card box of depression dishes she and her mom made. One we still make is called hot-dog casserole. A pack or two of hotdogs cut into inch size morsals,potatoes cut into stew size,and red& green peppers in inch pieces. Cover with 3-4 Del Monte tomato sauces and salt & pepper and bake at 350 for 35 minutes. GRESAT for young and old alike.....Tons more I could share if anyone is interested.
    leethebard
    #20
    Donna Douglass
    Double Cheeseburger
    • Total Posts : 508
    • Joined: 2000/08/22 16:52:00
    • Location: Columbus, OH
    • Status: offline
    RE: Depression era recipes 2008/01/18 19:51:03 (permalink)
    I guess I grew up in the depression, I'm 79 years old. But don't remember a thing about being hungry as Mom always had plenty of vegetables from her gardens, put up in cans and jars and bottles (as tomato juice, etc.) and Dad always seemed to have a few hogs or chickens stashed away somewhere that he could tend them, and of course, Grandpa and Grandma lived on a farm always and therefore we had meat readily available. Mom would forage in the summer (or let my brother and me do the foraging) for strawberries along the railroad tracks, elderberries (same places), and blackberries growing wild. From them we had the sweet jams and jellies she would make. All in all, we ate pretty darned well for not having much money to speak of. Dad always worked two jobs to make ends meet, but meet they did. I'm glad I grew up during those years and it has certainly made me appreciate what we have had in our married life of nearly 62 years.

    I'm certain there are hundreds and hundreds (maybe millions) of people who have similar memories and had the same experiences we did. What a rich life we truly did have. When we wanted donuts, Mom made them from scratch; we had homemade ginger ale and root beer and of course, cider. If the men wanted something stronger, they had their hard cider usually. I don't recall any really hard liquor being made by my grandpa but I'm sure, having come from the hills of Ohio, he and his peers had knowledge of many people who did make their own libations. Grandpa seemed satisfied with his hard cider.

    Lovely memories, lovely life.

    Donna
    #21
    boyardee65
    Double Chili Cheeseburger
    • Total Posts : 1460
    • Joined: 2005/08/28 21:21:00
    • Location: Surprise, AZ
    • Status: offline
    RE: Depression era recipes 2008/01/18 19:55:02 (permalink)
    This recipe came from my grandmother. She was a war wife with her husband over seas and several small children at home. I didn't see any recipes so I'll post one or two that I have.

    PENNYWISE SWISS STEAK

    2 LB round or rump steak
    2 TBS A.P. flour
    2 tsp salt
    2 tsp bacon drippings
    2 cups whole canned tomatoes, crushed
    3 small onions, sliced thin
    3 carrots sliced
    1/2 tsp Tobasco sauce
    1/4 cup raisins

    Trim fat from meat. Combine flour and salt. Pound this mixture into the meat.Brown the meat in a heavy deep skillet for 15-20 minutes. Add remaining ingredients except raisins. Simmer on low heat for 2-2 1/2 hours until tender. Add raisins in the last half hour of cooking.

    I credit this recipe to my Grandma, Rosetta Lee Bowen.


    David O.
    #22
    leethebard
    Sirloin
    • Total Posts : 6254
    • Joined: 2007/08/16 17:35:00
    • Location: brick, NJ
    • Status: offline
    RE: Depression era recipes 2008/01/19 10:33:37 (permalink)
    Hi,
    Here's another Depression era meal from my grandmother's file box...This one should also be added to the favorite Spinach recipe thread also.It's called spinach and potatoes...and I've heard from other old timers(over 50) who remember it.
    Heat olive oil and garlic in a pot. Add lots of fresh spinach(frozen in a pinch) Boil down...salt generously. Add a generous amount of peeled potatoes,cut in 1 1/2 inch squares. Cook 'til potatoes are soft to the fork...Enjoy! We ate this as a full,stew like meal..but it also makes a wonderful side dish. Remember, OLIVE OIL. Enjoy this old time treat.
    leethebard

    #23
    Twinwillow
    Sirloin
    • Total Posts : 5068
    • Joined: 2006/04/15 23:17:00
    • Location: "Big D"
    • Status: online
    RE: Depression era recipes 2008/01/19 10:58:16 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by chezkatie

    http://www.foodtimeline.org/fooddecades.html#1930s


    This will give you a good idea of what was popular at this time.


    What a very comprehensive, interesting and informative article. I have saved it for future reading as it is too long to just browse through. Thank you.
    #24
    the ancient mariner
    Filet Mignon
    • Total Posts : 3987
    • Joined: 2004/04/06 21:00:00
    • Location: st petersburg, florida
    • Status: offline
    RE: Depression era recipes 2008/01/19 11:02:08 (permalink)
    Friday night in a Catholic home when the fish weren't biting. Circa 1938/39

    Gordon's dried cod fish flakes made into fish cakes by adding a lot of potatoes
    and frying them up----at the same time a box of Mueller's spagetti was boiling away.
    A can of Del Monte peas was heated along with a can of Campbell's tomato soup, without the water.

    Sit down to a fish cake and spagetti with tomato soup poured over both and a helping of peas on the side. No wonder I was skinny.

    When the blues were running it was all the fish you could eat with all the spuds you wanted and home grown string beans and tomatoes---------now your talkin' !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    #25
    leethebard
    Sirloin
    • Total Posts : 6254
    • Joined: 2007/08/16 17:35:00
    • Location: brick, NJ
    • Status: offline
    RE: Depression era recipes 2008/01/19 11:11:38 (permalink)
    Ancient Mariner,

    sounds like my childhood Catholic home. But you lost me with the Bluefish...Live in New Jersey where Blues are abundant, but I can't abide that oily,dark meat fish!
    leethebard
    #26
    PapaJoe8
    Sirloin
    • Total Posts : 5504
    • Joined: 2006/01/13 11:23:00
    • Location: Dallas... DFW area
    • Status: offline
    RE: Depression era recipes 2008/01/19 12:20:07 (permalink)
    I love blue fish! They gotta be fresh, or freshly frozen, and cut up right.

    Ok, my PawPaw only had small stock ponds to fism from back in the depression days. He would catch small perch, grill them over wood... skin ( but scaled ), bones and all. He would cook them that way for me as a kid. You eat em skin, bones and all. That was my favorite kinda fish. Hmm, still is!
    Joe
    #27
    the ancient mariner
    Filet Mignon
    • Total Posts : 3987
    • Joined: 2004/04/06 21:00:00
    • Location: st petersburg, florida
    • Status: offline
    RE: Depression era recipes 2008/01/19 13:02:52 (permalink)
    The old saying---feed a man a fish and he can live for a day, teach
    him to fish and he can survive for a lifetime---or something like that.
    Well that pertained to me. My father taught me and I fished in Far
    Rockaway every day almost----even in winter where we would stand in
    knee deep Atlantic Ocean water in hip boots with a trident and a flash
    light. Stand still and wait a few minutes and flip on the light and there
    would be whiting swimming around the boots. One quick jab an there
    was dinner (or your foot). We called it Frost Fishing back in the 30's.
    By now they are problably on an endangered species list somewhere. In
    the fall we would go out on the old Jennette B and be knee deep in blues
    before we headed home.

    We didn't have a freezer---no one had--so everyone in the neighborhood
    got a fish. We caught 'em, we cleaned 'em and we gave 'em away. Except
    for the biggest one which we had for dinner !!!!!!! Super !!!!!
    I know a lot of people don't like bluefish but I love it and order it
    everytime I see it on a menu. Pizza and Brew in Scarsdale, NY has it
    and they do it great.

    Then we moved to Lake Ronkonkoma and I found a lake full of perch and
    like Papa Joe said they are dee-lich-ous. My father would be sitting
    at the table with knife and fork in hand waiting for me to bring in the
    catch, and I never failed him. Cooked up in a minute. You can keep the
    fancy stuff and all the bar-b-q in the world --I'll take blues and perch.

    Thank you Lord for oceans, lakes and streams and lottsa fish. Amen. Now
    dig in.

    #28
    PapaJoe8
    Sirloin
    • Total Posts : 5504
    • Joined: 2006/01/13 11:23:00
    • Location: Dallas... DFW area
    • Status: offline
    RE: Depression era recipes 2008/01/19 13:35:37 (permalink)
    Ancient, whiting was one of my Dad's favorite fish. I didn't know about the "frost fishng", thanks! Not that I'm goina try it....

    And yep, blues and perch will do for me.
    Joe
    #29
    roossy90
    Sirloin
    • Total Posts : 6695
    • Joined: 2005/08/15 16:17:00
    • Location: columbus, oh
    • Status: offline
    RE: Depression era recipes 2008/01/19 14:50:47 (permalink)
    I sold a set of 2 recipe/cookbooks from the 30's and 40's on Ebay a couple years ago.....They used to be my mothers......One of them even had a section with wild game recipes....
    (This is before I hooked up with Roadfood)..
    Sometimes I wish I had kept them... They were sure fun to read...very odd to look at old time cookbooks and think that it actually was very hard to cook lots of things back then......
    I have a whole book of some I kept, but I think most of them are 50's and 60's era....
    #30
    Page: 123 > Showing page 1 of 3
    Jump to:
    © 2014 APG vNext Commercial Version 5.1