Dried Fish in Mexican Market

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marshrat
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2007/04/02 10:11:17 (permalink)

Dried Fish in Mexican Market

I stopped in my favorite Mexican grocery yesterday to pick up a few things. In the bulk dried peppers, posole, etc bin were these dried and flattened fish. They were about 12-14 inches long and almost in 'sheets'.
You could pick up 3 to 4 at a time. The two guys buying some of them said they were good, but after that the language barrier was too much for me.

Anybody seen these? Do you boil them? I'm intrigued. Thanks!
#1

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    wheregreggeats.com
    Filet Mignon
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    RE: Dried Fish in Mexican Market 2007/04/02 10:34:34 (permalink)
    Good question.

    I'll bet they are salllllllllllllllty.

    Can't wait to hear from people who have dared actually eat them.

    #2
    Texianjoe
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    RE: Dried Fish in Mexican Market 2007/04/02 10:41:49 (permalink)
    I have never tried the dried fish. The dried shrimp I buy all the time. They are chewy but make a good beer snack. I have heard people use them in seafood soup. You could probably use the fish the same way.

    joe
    #3
    Jimeats
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    RE: Dried Fish in Mexican Market 2007/04/02 11:06:51 (permalink)
    Yes it's bacalar {sp?} You can soak it in milk to get rid of the saltieness and reconstitute it. I've used it succesfully for homemade fish cakes or a mock finnean haddie. Many Italian markets carry it also. Chow Jim
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    marshrat
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    RE: Dried Fish in Mexican Market 2007/04/02 18:55:59 (permalink)
    Thanks for the replies! I found some recipes for bacalao, including one with the fish, sauted onion and garlic scrambled with eggs. Sounds interesting! That recipe also talked about using a fork to scrape the meat off around the bones after rehydrating. These were whole fish, not boneless pieces.

    This market also had Victoria beer, so next time I'll get some dried shrimp to go with it. Also, I won't go on a Sunday- dang blue laws in S.C.!
    #5
    Sundancer7
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    RE: Dried Fish in Mexican Market 2007/04/03 08:39:43 (permalink)
    I saw lotsa dried shrimp at the Fiesta on South Main Street in Houston. They had an immense supply so I assumed they sold a lot of them. I never had the nerve to buy them although I was tempted.

    Paul E. Smith
    Knoxville, TN
    #6
    mayor al
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    RE: Dried Fish in Mexican Market 2007/04/03 13:21:58 (permalink)
    The Nowegians have been eating that stuff for eons! They call it LUTEFISK and our Washington corresponent "I-95" thrives on the stuff.
    SO, The Mexicans are eating Lutefisk and calling it something "Latino". Considering all the attention given on various threads to LUTEFISK, I can imagine that now we will hear even more about the 'South of the Border' version.
    #7
    BunglingBill
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    RE: Dried Fish in Mexican Market 2007/04/03 14:40:18 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by Jimeats

    Yes it's bacalar {sp?} You can soak it in milk to get rid of the saltieness and reconstitute it. I've used it succesfully for homemade fish cakes or a mock finnean haddie. Many Italian markets carry it also. Chow Jim


    Jim, salted, dried fish (often Cod) is found in many cultures, even in ancient Rome. Hence, it is still popular as an Italian dish (they usually spell it baccala ).

    Like you, I have reconstituted it by soaking it in milk and then making good (well, actually, "okay") fishcakes with it.

    There are hundreds of recipes on the internet (I have about 75 in my collection) which use baccala. Even Mario Batali has used it on his show and in his restaurants.

    Frankly, I would just as soon use "fresh" fish in my dishes, but baccala is a historical novelty and it's fun to experiment with it.

    Indeed, it seems that the dried, salted fish is making a come-back, as evidenced by the original poster's observation.

    I read somewhere (but I can't find the reference at the moment) that the Mayans salted and dried fish as well. Probably would have been a salt-water fish.

    But, that could explain why it (salted fish) is still found in Latin American markets.

    #8
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