Eating the Land of Lincoln

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KingT
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2009/02/12 12:17:51 (permalink)

Eating the Land of Lincoln

I now have some old neighborhood friends who have to go downstate a few times a week for work and I joined them last week for a day of binge eating with a little sightseeing mixed in. I hadn't been in and around Springfield since my 8th grade field trip when we went to the state attractions and Cozy Dog which was by far the highlight. Hopefully this photo recap can help with spots to eat in the area alot of my information on a came from here as far as places to go so thanks. Impressive roadfood destination. If corn dogs, 30's style burgers, chili and route 66 type food is your thing then take a trip this spring. I have plans for a route 66 trip this summer and Springfield is a great starting point for some great route 66 style eateries, the ones that haven't changed thru time.


Happy 200th President Lincoln a statewide celebration


Riding Route 66


Lincolns Springfield Home


cozy dog


cozy had a good 30's style burger but nowhere near as good as Krekels below

Springfield might be the most popular spot for chili outside Texas that I know of. Its chili selection and quality puts Chicago's to shame. They take it seriously down there and the Tavern style contains ground beef, beef suet, tons of grease, beans and different levels of heat. The hot is hot, trust me on that. It was funny because I saw one of Ozzie Guillen's good buddys a lobbyist and he was ordering about 8 cups of chili with no beans or meat at Joe Rogers. Thats just the grease. I enjoyed both chili spots greatly.

Joe Rogers Chili Parlor is still going strong.







They also have a tamale history down in Springfield



My favorite chili by far was the tavern style chili from a relatively new chili parlor by Springfield standards.






The tavern style 3 way is everything chili macs wants to be

The sandwich that put Springfield on the food map. Horseshoes much like sliders from White Castle are that fine line between amazing and disturbing. Between these things, the politics and the bowls of chili that turn into lard if they sit for more than 20 minutes, Springfield isn't easy on the heart or waist. I was mad that Darcys Pint had stopped offering the Obama Horseshoe which was a loco moco themed sandwich with hamburger pattys, rice and brown gravy and a fried egg that could of been something else...for better or worse. I went with the buffalo chicken. Governor Thompson, a mentor of a neighborhood friend explained that its the cheese sauce that makes Darcy's the best horseshoe in town, it cant be replicated.


Buffalo chicken Horseshoe


These stoner creations have more cheese than Wisconsin

Im always on the prowl for the perfect 30's style burger and Krekels in Springfield did a pretty perfect job. I always go double with the 30's style, I think its the perfect balance of meat and bun.





Thanks for the tips from this top notch thread. Hope these help. There are quite a few chili parlors down there though many are gone. I'm very interested in the history if anyone is from there and has any stories. I know how the Dew opened and started the trend. Its also the state gateway to Terlingua Texas. If you win the Springfield regional you can participate in the chili super bowl which I plan to do one day.

Cozy Dog Drive In
2935 S 6th St
Springfield, IL 62703
(217) 525-1992

Darcy's Pint
661 W Stanford Ave
Springfield, IL 62704
(217) 492-8800

Cook's Spice Rack & Chili Company
910 N Grand Ave W
Springfield, IL 62702
(217) 492-2695

Joe Rogers Original Recipe Chili Parlor
820 S 9th St
Springfield, IL 62703
(217) 522-3722

Krekel's Custard
2121 N Grand Ave E
Springfield, IL 62702
(217) 525-4952
#1

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    MiamiDon
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    Re:Eating the Land of Lincoln 2009/02/12 13:07:45 (permalink)
    Great report.  I think I gained ten pounds just looking at the photos!

    What is a 30's-style hamburger?
    #2
    leethebard
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    Re:Eating the Land of Lincoln 2009/02/12 13:47:54 (permalink)
    Nice report, some great looking food...that Krekel's burger looks super. Thanks for posting!
    #3
    KingT
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    Re:Eating the Land of Lincoln 2009/02/12 13:57:40 (permalink)
    No prob. A 30's style burger is how they used to be made back in the day before my time. Just a simple ball of beef maybe 1/8 to 1/10 pound that is flattened on a griddle and cooked until the edges are crispy. Its simply topped with American cheese, chopped onions, pickles and mustard. Once placed in the butcher paper it steams the bun a little creating my favorite type of burger. Krekels was a great example.
    #4
    Nancypalooza
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    Re:Eating the Land of Lincoln 2009/02/12 14:10:49 (permalink)
    Those are beautiful chili pictures but they made me burp.  They don't believe in skimming their meat after they brown it do they?
    #5
    sammur
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    Re:Eating the Land of Lincoln 2009/02/12 14:40:51 (permalink)
    Thank you King T. That was great. Your photos really enhance your trip report. Interesting history on the Chili Den. Please report again.
    #6
    MiamiDon
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    Re:Eating the Land of Lincoln 2009/02/12 14:59:45 (permalink)
    Nancypalooza

    Those are beautiful chili pictures but they made me burp.  They don't believe in skimming their meat after they brown it do they?


    Evidently it's a Springfield thing, Nancy.  Check out the photo taken by Buffetbuster in this review:
     
    http://www.roadfood.com/Reviews/Overview.aspx?RefID=6346
     
     
    #7
    Nancypalooza
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    Re:Eating the Land of Lincoln 2009/02/12 15:29:00 (permalink)
    Jiminy.  I'd just skip straight to the Tums.
    #8
    carolina bob
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    Re:Eating the Land of Lincoln 2009/02/12 16:18:47 (permalink)
    King T, I really enjoyed your report and especially the photos. I've lived in Illinois virtually my whole life and, until now, I had no idea that Springfield was home to so much good food. As greasy as that chili looks, I'd still love to try it. Guess I've got to plan a trip down to central Ill. real soon. 
    #9
    HotDogHead
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    Re:Eating the Land of Lincoln 2009/02/12 17:21:54 (permalink)
    Awesome report!  Great photos.  Every meal made my mouth water. 
    #10
    seatown76
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    Re:Eating the Land of Lincoln 2009/02/12 17:37:24 (permalink)
    Love the chili pics.

    I myself am a chili minimalist and can't stand to see chili with noodles of any kind and like the fact that it can be ordered seperate. Since I have been in Wisconsin for about 8 years now I have seen more people cook chili with the noodles right in it!!!!

    THAT"S NOT CHILI!!!!!!!
    #11
    TJ Jackson
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    Re:Eating the Land of Lincoln 2009/02/12 18:05:31 (permalink)
    There are many different regional variations on chili.  This website celebrates and revels in those regional differences

    so, this is Chili (at least one kind of it):


    and this is simple intolerance, the opposite of what Roadfood.com is all about:
    seatown76
    THAT"S NOT CHILI!!!!!!!

    post edited by TJ Jackson - 2009/02/12 18:06:56
    #12
    Davydd
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    Re:Eating the Land of Lincoln 2009/02/12 19:35:24 (permalink)
    seatown76

    Love the chili pics.

    I myself am a chili minimalist and can't stand to see chili with noodles of any kind and like the fact that it can be ordered seperate. Since I have been in Wisconsin for about 8 years now I have seen more people cook chili with the noodles right in it!!!!

    THAT"S NOT CHILI!!!!!!!


    I grew up eating chili my mother made where she broke spaghetti noodles in pieces and cooked it right in the chili. The place: Indianapolis, IN maybe via Fort Wayne, IN where she was raised. That dates back to the 50s. So, should I say that's not chili if it doesn't have noodles? Heed TJ Jackson's advice. There are so many variants. Regardless of my preferences I like trying them all. BTW, no, I do not put noodles in my chili, nor beans, but my wife insists on beans when she makes it.
    #13
    KingT
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    Re:Eating the Land of Lincoln 2009/02/12 20:23:22 (permalink)
    Seatown76 I agree and mac isnt really a Springfield thing, more of a midwest, but I do enjoy it with some mac now and then so I ordered the Spice Racks Springfield Tavern style chili three way, which is with onions, cheese and pasta, its an Ohio thing and Midwest but I do enjoy the mac now and then Im not going to lie even though its not really chili with it. Chili is just one of those food topics that is going to stir up debate, gotta love it.

    Chili is as regional as hot dogs and there are many variations of what people eat with chili including but not limited too fritos, macaroni, rice, oyster crackers, beans, cornbread and Im sure a few others.

    I'm pretty familiar with the Northwoods of Wisconsin and I used to go to summer camp at a place called camp algonquin in Rhinelander (mid 90's) but I heard its gone. When I was in school in Madison one summer a few years back me and my girl took a ride up to Bayfield, WI which was just amazing and I have plans to redo again this summer with a tour of the Northwoods eats ending in Bayfield with a stop in Rhinelander to see it again and a few other spots that are the exact opposite of whats going on outside my house. Live a couple summer weeks in the Northwoods, a favorite of mine, got any suggestions foodwise? thanks
    #14
    squwigr
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    Re:Eating the Land of Lincoln 2009/02/12 21:42:25 (permalink)
    Here's a great pic of a Springfield horseshoe (taken at D'Arcy's Pint when it was in its old location where the Dublin Pub is now): http://tinyurl.com/aep3ze    

    The story describes just how these sandwiches are made!
    #15
    roadfood junkie
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    Re:Eating the Land of Lincoln 2009/02/13 01:53:44 (permalink)
    Hi all!

    I've been an avid reader of roadfood for a long time. I decided to join up tonight.

    The Springfield, IL horseshoes are definitely a thing to behold! You can also get a "ponyshoe" that is usually about half the size, and doesn't give you the guilt of a whole "shoe"!

    In the market, D'Arcy's Pint is the definitive winner! When the Red Coach was still around, they had the corner on the business. Now we enjoy Westwood's Lodge's shoes as well. They are located on West Jefferson St. in Springfield.
     
    Long live the horseshoe!
    #16
    carolina bob
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    Re:Eating the Land of Lincoln 2009/02/13 03:43:22 (permalink)
    roadfood junkie, welcome to roadfood.com. From one "newbie" to another, glad to have you aboard!                         Bob
    #17
    douginvirginia
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    Re:Eating the Land of Lincoln 2009/02/13 07:28:31 (permalink)
    Another great trip report from KingT. Thanks for your efforts, you do a wonderful job of reporting your region's offerings.
    #18
    FriedClamFanatic
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    Re:Eating the Land of Lincoln 2009/02/13 08:21:02 (permalink)
    Fantastic report with great pics!  To be honest, I never heard of the horshoe until a few days ago.  Not sure my arteries or my taste buds could take it, but I may have to try it sometime in the interest of better jounalism, if I ever get to Springfield (been to MA and PA, but not IL yet)
    #19
    buffetbuster
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    Re:Eating the Land of Lincoln 2009/02/17 13:13:43 (permalink)
    KingT-
    Beautiful report and photos!  Looks like we hit some of the same places, since I was just recently in Springfield.
    #20
    dexmat
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    Re:Eating the Land of Lincoln 2009/02/17 14:03:04 (permalink)
    Great report KingT.  A lot of good places to eat in Springfield while taking in what you can about Abe. 

    I've never heard of 30s style burgers before but will be on the lookout for them; they look great.

    I thought the Tavern Style chili (mac) looked great, too as well as the chili on a tamale.  I can't remember seeing chili mac on menus around here in a long time.

    Yes there are different styles of chili - Texas Red, Cincinnati style, New Mexican Green Chili stew.  Nothing inspires more passion, indigestion and b/s than chili.

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    clevelandmb
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    Re:Eating the Land of Lincoln 2009/07/28 22:52:48 (permalink)
    King T.   What a super post.  I have not been on Road Food for a Long Time, but do live about 2 hr from Springfield and your post will have me traveling to our capital city real soon!!   And super pics also.
    #22
    Dr of BBQ
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    Re:Eating the Land of Lincoln 2009/12/08 01:38:42 (permalink)
    Missouri horning in on our horseshoe

    THE STATE JOURNAL-REGISTER
    Posted Dec 06, 2009 @ 12:04 AM
    Last update Dec 06, 2009 @ 08:11 AM

    I was in Missouri for Thanksgiving when my brother-in-law happened to recommend a restaurant in Eldon called The Silver Dollar. Good food, cheap. It sounds like my kind of place.

    “Oh,” he says, “and they serve horseshoes.”

    It wasn’t until the next day when I was in the car on the way home that it hit me.

    Say what?

    Missouri can’t sell horseshoe sandwiches. Those are ours. Springfield’s. You could look it up. You don’t ever find a reference to the horseshoe sandwich without it mentioning Springfield. We invented it. It’s ours.

    Horseshoe Fun Fact #1: Googling “horseshoe sandwich, Springfield, Illinois” results in 257,000 hits. Googling “horseshoe sandwich, Missouri” results in exactly zero hits.

    You can’t serve horseshoes someplace else. It’s unheard of. Can’t be done.

    This is an outrage. I suppose Missourians will also claim Abe Lincoln. They’ll say he lived in Springfield, Mo., when he was elected president. It’s to place, and the kindness of those people he owes everything? I don’t think so.

    Horseshoe Fun Fact #2: Did you know the horseshoe has its own Facebook page? It does. And it mentions Springfield, of course. You never find one without the other. Until now.

    Determined to get to the bottom of this gross injustice, I called The Silver Dollar in Eldon and spoke (very harshly, too, I might add) with owner Stan Abazi. So, Stan, what’s up with our horseshoe sandwiches?

    “I used to live in Illinois,” he explained. “I’m from Illinois. I had a business in Illinois for 30 years.”

    But that, he said, was in Aurora, not Springfield. He heard about the horseshoe, of course, while living in Illinois and decided when he opened The Silver Dollar that he would just go ahead and serve it. He didn’t even ask permission.

    “They like it,” he says of Missourians. “They try it and they love it.”

    That’s no excuse. Didn’t anybody in Springfield copyright our sandwich? Is it too late?

    We cannot share the horseshoe. We cannot let it become just another menu item at restaurants across the country. It’s ours.

    Horseshoe Fun Fact #3: Depending on their personal vital statistics and profile, participants in the Weight Watchers program may consume somewhere from 18 to 37 points a day. A horseshoe sandwich equals 386 points.

    I certainly plan to contact Sen. Dick Durbin’s Springfield office to ask whether, as soon as the senator votes on wars, health-care reform, economic issues, Wall Street oversight, perhaps a new Supreme Court justice and an alternative-energy policy (you know, the minor issues of our time) that he sponsor a bill proclaiming the horseshoe sandwich the exclusive property of Springfield.

    After that, any out-of-town restaurant that serves horseshoe sandwiches will have to pay a hefty royalty fee to the city, and there will be no need for the city to raise the property tax as the mayor has proposed.

    Final Horseshoe Fun Fact: There is another Web site devoted to the horseshoe
    (horseshoesandwich.com). Its blog could use some updating, but it does include a review of horseshoes at different Springfield restaurants.

    That’s Springfield, Illinois, not Springfield, Missouri.

    Dave Bakke can be reached at 788-1541 or dave.bakke@sj-r.com.


    Comments (21)
    Nimzoman
    The 'horseshoe' was 'invented' in Scandinavia 1,000 years ago. It is called smorebrod there.
    obscureknight
    actually, Dave...............

    as a gross-out, pig-out dish, the horseshoe unfortunately is rather tame and sedate;

    if you have watched some of the other dining spots that Adam Richman has visited for his cable program 'Man vs. Food' on the Travel Channel (Comcast no. 62), you will have seen that there are several 'sandwiches' which outweigh the classic horseshoe in both calories as well as overall weight
    thus, if some little town in Missouri wants to serve a horseshoe, simply bear in mind that little town will forevermore have the same hick status as Springfield, IL.

    magda1020
    There's a bar in Chicago (http://www.6degreesbucktown.com/) that serves horseshoes as well - I heard about it from a friend who knew the owner when they lived here.
    BOUNTY HUNTER

    Read the article through , it mentions ' horseshoe fun facts ' four times . This article was written all in fun .
    Cochise

    While I hate to out my own father, he called to ask for the horseshoe recipe, intending to serve it in his restaurant in Iowa last year. I stalled him but, drat the internet, he Googled it and was able to serve them anyway. Iowa can't serve horseshoes either, they are OURS!

    curious observer

    In 1998 my son taught the (gulp) cafeteria staff at Truman State University in Kirksville, MO how to make a horseshoe. He missed them too much. He sold out our honor for his own convenience. I'm so, so sorry. And other students started getting them. Like the swine flu, it could be spreading like wildfire for all we know.

    Odd Job
    Dave,

    If you travel to Bettendorf IA, there is a 24 hour diner called Ross' which for years has been the home of the Magic Mountain. It bears a striking resemblance to the horseshoe.You may want to investigate.

    BobJudd/Chatham

    Horseshoe Fun Fact #3: > I certainly plan to contact Sen. Dick Durbins Springfield office to ask that he sponsor a bill proclaiming the horseshoe sandwich the exclusive property of Springfield.

    May I add?:
    Horseshoe Fun Fact #3 - ( A ) : I would be careful about alerting Durbin to the Horseshoe sandwich being served in Eldon Mo., for fear he would give Amtrak $Millions to run a Horseshoe Express, hi-speed train to them from Chicago and bypassing Springfield Ill.

    A Good Humorous article Dave..
    Some of the posters need to lighten up a tad, and enjoy some humor occasionally. Life's too Serious to take the all the small things so serious..

    Suncatcher

    We are the kings/queens of homeade cheese sauce! We don't tolerate any canned/powdered mixes, only the real deal thrives in our town. Most of the outside places don't do it right.

    danrichards

    everyone knows who invented the horseshoe ,a chef at the leland hotel and his assistant anthony [the buffalo] wables,god bless his creative soul.

    Anony

    When one says they serve horseshoes in another town, I would ask HOW that horseshoe is actually made. I was in Collinsville, IL a few years ago. Driving around town, looking for a place to eat, I saw a place that advertised horseshoes. I stopped and ordered one. When the server brought the plate out, I took one look and told her that I order the horseshoe. She said that that's what I had. I looked down again.....It was basically just a burger (with a burger bun) opened up with SOME cheese sauce poured over it. The fries were on the side as well. And there were pickles and onions on it too. Needless to say, next time I'm outside Springfield, IL and see that someone else is claiming to serve horseshoes I'll be sure to ask how it's made before ordering it. If you're gonna try and steal Springfield's main food attraction at least serve it correctly.

    Skyballs

    How do you feel about a fellow Springfield native who has opened restaurant elsewhere in the country who has decided to honor his roots by putting the Horseshoe on the menu? The son of the owner of Norb Andy's has done just that down here in Austin, TX and I am ever so thankful that he has. I love the fact that I can get a little taste of home even down here in Texas. Viva La Horseshoe!!!

    katiebug

    Several years ago, I was at a restaurant in Hannibal, MO and they had a horseshoe on the menu. I didn't order it, but the description sounded like ours. My parents live in SE MO and my dad has given the horseshoe recipe to a couple of restaurant owners that he knows, but the dish never made it to their menus...

    L-town

    You guys act like this is these things are the trade secret to Coca Cola. Its a piece of toast with meat, fries, and cheese on top. Its not some top secret recipe we are talking about here. Get a grip.

    LandofLincoln

    Export it! It's probably responsible for 5% of the obesity and heart attacks in the city anyways. Junk food that is entirely unnecessary.

    pmwizz

    I moved to Manitowoc, Wis a couple of years ago and I tried to get my favorite pub to serve the horseshoe...even gave them the recipe.. they refused saying it sounded gross and wouldn't go over here in town...
    They don't know what they are missing...


    Mark Observed

    Dave, when I am out of town I would like to have a horseshoe now and then. So, I must confess that I was talking to the cook in an Irish pub in Phoenix and told him about the horseshoe and D'arcy's Pint. He was going to try it. I have not been back to see if he added it to the menu though.

    denmac

    L-town: Too bad you don't allow room in your life for a little fun. Get a grip!

    JDR

    You must be logged in to report abuse.
    at least tow pubs in Bloomington, Il have one and one restaurant near Sanible, Fl

    cubbiefan2

    Everyone knows the Simpsons are from Springfield IL, too.

    SuperFan

    Funny stuff Dave. Most on here got it, some, oh well. Actually, I have been kinda surprised over the years that our beloved 386 point feast hasn't spread. Maybe because it is far more appetizing than it sounds and ''foreign'' restaurant proprietors are reluctant to give it a try. Or maybe it's that 386 point thingy...lol


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    #23
    myterry2
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    Re:Eating the Land of Lincoln 2009/12/08 04:21:44 (permalink)
    Loved everything about this report...especially the fine pictures.
    #24
    EatingTheRoad
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    Re:Eating the Land of Lincoln 2009/12/08 08:12:35 (permalink)
    Dr of BBQ Horseshoe Fun Fact #3: Depending on their personal vital statistics and profile, participants in the Weight Watchers program may consume somewhere from 18 to 37 points a day. A horseshoe sandwich equals 386 points.
    I was laughing so hard at this.

    Excellent report and photos King T!!!
    #25
    EatingTheRoad
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    Re:Eating the Land of Lincoln 2009/12/08 14:07:53 (permalink)
    I was reading through some of the cool links from here on the Horseshoe. I remember watching this video of Diners, Drive-ins & Dives at Charlie Parker's:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O4hjSvMhuOw

    There was a Horseshoe competition with five categories: classic shoe, breakfast shoe, dessert shoe, “crazy horse” shoe and best overall shoe. AmberJack Alehouse won for dessert shoe...what is the dessert shoe?!? I would love to see and try one of those. I couldn't find anything on there menu about the dessert shoe. Has anyone tried one or know what it is?

    #26
    Dr of BBQ
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    Re:Eating the Land of Lincoln 2009/12/08 14:50:39 (permalink)
    That contest ended up being a fubar. (spelling?) And I read the article in our local newspaper about the contest but I don't think they reported what was in the dessert shoe. Let me do a little research on it.
    Jack
    #27
    Dr of BBQ
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    Re:Eating the Land of Lincoln 2009/12/08 15:03:52 (permalink)
    Here is the short answer:

    Amaretto-soaked buttermilk biscuits served as the foundation of a dessert shoe that was adorned with luscious strawberries, candied nuts and airy clouds of whipped cream. Renoir couldn’t have painted a more captivating vision.

    Kathryn Rem: 'Shoe fetish: All kinds of options are out there for horseshoes

    By KATHRYN REM (kathryn.rem@sj-r.com)

    THE STATE JOURNAL-REGISTER
    Posted Aug 12, 2009 @ 12:00 AM
    Last update Aug 12, 2009 @ 07:08 AM



    Until a week ago, I thought a horseshoe was a horseshoe was a horseshoe.

    Yes, there are differences in the cheese sauce and the meat and shape of the fries. But, in my mind, the hot, layered sandwich always fit a prescribed template: toast, meat, cheese sauce, fries.

    But then I judged the horseshoe cook-off sponsored by the Prairie Capital Convention Center that was held in conjunction with the 100th Anniversary World Horseshoe Tournament.

    I saw horseshoes there — bewitching temptations prepared by area restaurants — that I had never dreamed of.

    There was the bayou shoe: egg-dipped golden brioche piled artfully with a tender beef fillet strip, Louisiana crabmeat and — instead of fries — delicate orange shoestrings of fried sweet potatoes that cascaded over the mound of molten goodness.

    Amaretto-soaked buttermilk biscuits served as the foundation of a dessert shoe that was adorned with luscious strawberries, candied nuts and airy clouds of whipped cream. Renoir couldn’t have painted a more captivating vision.

    A taco shoe with a delightfully sweet-hot flavor and a blaze of colors showed off black olives, green onions, red tomatoes and a tangerine-hued sauce that walked the line between salsa and barbecue. It was Mexican. It was American. It was delicious.

    Eggs Benedict anyone? A horseshoe version of the classic brunch dish was a masterpiece of eggy brioche, lean Canadian bacon, perfectly scrambled eggs and buttery hollandaise sauce, all topped with a shower of wavy shoestring potatoes. Bravo!

    One of the shoes featured meaty portobello mushrooms along with a perfectly spiced hamburger. Accoutrements were red onions, green pickles and bacon — yes, flavorful strips of the Lord’s gift to humans. The showpiece was garnished with a crimson rose fashioned skillfully from a tomato.

    There were shoes with Italian beef on them and Philly cheesesteak. Breakfast varieties flaunted hash browns and sausage gravy. One wondrous creation boasted a beer-infused Welsh rarebit sauce over lean ham and a rich egg-and-vegetable strata.

    And the horseshoes just kept coming. Sixteen of them, each more innovative than the one before.

    It was like strolling through the Louvre, discovering one masterpiece after another. But it wasn’t just a visual feast. It also was a first-rate banquet of aromas and flavors.

    I’ve been thinking about the horseshoe ever since.

    What other combinations are possible?
    Golden waffles, mocha ice cream, chocolate sauce and cinnamon-spiced whipped cream.

    Toasted ciabatta, sage-roasted turkey, nutmeg-seasoned bechamel sauce and grilled corn kernels.

    Thick French toast, pork sausage patties, sweet raspberry syrup and fresh blueberries, banana slices and toasted pecans.

    What are your ideas for the 21st-century horseshoe?

    Please let me know.

    Food editor Kathryn Rem can be reached at 788-1520 or kathryn.rem@sj-r.com.

    http://www.sj-r.com/featu...t-there-for-horseshoes


    #28
    EatingTheRoad
    Double Chili Cheeseburger
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    Re:Eating the Land of Lincoln 2009/12/08 19:10:04 (permalink)
    Wow, that's quite a creation. Thanks for finding that Dr of BBQ. I don't know about here assertion of horseshoes though. I'd say that most of those quickly cease to be a horseshoe and more of a pile of "junk". Not that they wouldn't be tasty but just piling stuff on top of more stuff doesn't make it a horseshoe.

    A horseshoe, for the most part, consists of (1) bread, (2) meat, (3) potato & (4) cheese sauce, correct? I don't think a dessert shoe...or some of those other things come anywhere near this.
    #29
    LeadBelly
    Hamburger
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    Re:Eating the Land of Lincoln 2009/12/08 21:22:51 (permalink)
    If you're away from Springfield and stop in a place offering Springfield horseshoes, you know its not going to be like a horseshoe in Springfield. This is a corollary of the Philly cheesesteak rule. 
    #30
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