Ethiopian

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vinelady
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2003/05/15 13:08:30 (permalink)

Ethiopian

Where is you favorite place to eat Ethopian?
#1

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    vinelady
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    RE: Ethiopian 2003/05/15 13:14:18 (permalink)
    Guess I should have listed my favorite. It is the Queen of Sheba in Portland OR.
    #2
    kland01s
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    RE: Ethiopian 2003/05/15 13:43:34 (permalink)
    Theres a place in Chicago called Ethiopian Village. I've always wanted to try it, it gets good reviews. I believe it's in the Wrigleyville area.
    #3
    Lovie
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    RE: Ethiopian 2003/06/17 23:22:01 (permalink)
    The first place I had Ethiopian food was in a house turned resturant in Ottawa Ontario. We were literally dinning in the houses dinning room and we were the only ones in the place and every taste and flavor just exploded the moment it hit the tounge. The second place was in Osbourne vlliage in Winnipeg Manitoba were the heat was broken in the middle of winter and the food took soo long to arrive because it was all home made but was well worth the waite. The third was in Madison Wisconsin on State street called Baraka. It has a food cart in the summer as well and is as every bit as great as the other experiences. If you havn't tried Ethiopian food you owe it to yourself to have a food adventure today.
    #4
    marberthenad
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    RE: Ethiopian 2004/04/04 11:52:46 (permalink)
    DC has many Ehiopian eatiers. Many of them are also nightclubs. The food is generally very good. One of the best, imho, is Dukem, located in the Adams Morgan neighborhood, where most of the other Ethiopian restaurants are. I would second Lovie's recommendation. The most fun part is using the Ethiopian flat bread (name escapes me) as a scoop on which the meat and veggie dishes sit.
    #5
    meowzart
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    RE: Ethiopian 2004/04/05 14:00:40 (permalink)
    I second Marber. DC has great Ethiopian eateries, and if you go to the Adams Morgan neighborhood, you could easily do an Ethiopian eat-around. I like Dukem, too, and also Meskerem. The food is delicious and made even more so by the reasonable prices.

    Just curious...does any other town or city in the US have such a high concentration of Ethiopian as DC? I've actually never eaten Ethiopian elsewhere, so I'm not sure. I ask this because I am thinking of the thread on "when does ethnic food become Roadfood"? A lot of people said when an ethnic cuisine becomes associated with a region. I think DC's Ethiopian concentration could certainly fit this bill.
    #6
    mtbuckingham
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    RE: Ethiopian 2004/04/05 14:08:59 (permalink)
    The flat bread is called injera, I believe. I've only been to Meskerem in Adams Morgan, DC- my first (and only) experience was good, but next time I'll go with fellow meat eaters (my vegetarian friend and I shared a meal). I really have no excuse not to go more, as it's in my backyard. I have to get over my mild dislike of sour-tasting spongy bread.
    #7
    wanderingjew
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    RE: Ethiopian 2004/04/05 14:19:44 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by meowzart


    Just curious...does any other town or city in the US have such a high concentration of Ethiopian as DC? I've actually never eaten Ethiopian elsewhere, so I'm not sure. I ask this because I am thinking of the thread on "when does ethnic food become Roadfood"? A lot of people said when an ethnic cuisine becomes associated with a region. I think DC's Ethiopian concentration could certainly fit this bill.


    Seattle and NYC also have a significant concentration of Ethiopian Restaurants. If I can recall, Seattle had about 3 or 4, NYC has numerous, don't know how many specifically.
    #8
    arianej
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    RE: Ethiopian 2004/04/06 23:24:32 (permalink)
    Not many Ethiopian places in our neck of the woods, unfortunately. We like the Blue Nile in Columbus, OH. (Although Cincinnati has a place called the East African Restaurant that's also good.) The Blue Nile has combo dinners you can order if you want to sample a bunch of different things. I love that dish with chunks of lamb sauteed with peppers and onions, Doro Wat Chicken, the collard greens, split peas...

    Just thinking about it gets my saliva glands going. *sigh*

    Ariane
    #9
    carlton pierre
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    RE: Ethiopian 2004/09/20 17:47:51 (permalink)
    I love Ethiopian food and west African food as well. Someone mentioned Adams Morgan district in DC. That seems to be the Mecca, however, I've found excellent Ethioipian restaurants in Nashville, Kansas City, and Charlotte. The food is incredible and I look for an Ethiopian restaurant in any major city I go to.

    carl reitz
    #10
    zataar
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    RE: Ethiopian 2004/09/21 15:41:02 (permalink)
    A block and 1/2 from my house in KC is a very good Ethiopian place called Addis Ababa. I think at least 60% of all Ethiopian restaurants I've seen are called that, after the capital of course. This one is very good, and very reasonable. If you order the buffet at lunch there isn't a buffet line, they just bring communal trays of different items to your table, refilling them as you want, which isn't too often. It's a very generous amount of food to begin with. And they have the best iced tea. And Ethiopian beer and wine. Good music, too.
    #11
    Emilyparis
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    RE: Ethiopian 2004/09/21 16:29:56 (permalink)
    I ate at Entoto in Paris, loved the weird spongy bread and eating with my fingers. We also got some wonderful tea at the end of the meal but I can't remember the spice they flavored it with. Does this ring a bell with anyone? Traditional Ethiopian tea?

    I'd love to make it at home for guests.
    #12
    zataar
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    RE: Ethiopian 2004/09/21 18:20:56 (permalink)
    It seemed to me to be a type of chai, which is just the word for "tea" in many eastern cultures. Clove and green cardamom were predominant.
    #13
    Danmel
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    RE: Ethiopian 2004/09/22 17:16:37 (permalink)
    I like to cook lots of different ethnic foods at home and one time I made Ethiopian. I couldn't find TEFF, which is the sour flour used to make injera, so I subsututed whole wheat flour and self rising flour. I made doro wat and greens. It was really good. Then we ate at an Ethiopian place on MacDougal Street in Greenwich Village- it might be called Meskerem, but I'm not sure- it did begin with an M. They made real injera and the kids didn't like it at all, although the other food was good and they liked eating with their hands and not getting yelled at. So when I saw Teff flour at the Fariway, my husband said-
    " NO- make it the inauthentic way!
    #14
    zataar
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    RE: Ethiopian 2004/09/22 21:02:06 (permalink)
    Danmel, do try the teff flour version of injera at home, maybe don't let it ferment as long as some recipes say. It isn't so sour, but a pleasing spongy texture is still there. It's great that you try ethnic food at home. Too many people are afraid of the different flavors.
    #15
    carlton pierre
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    RE: Ethiopian 2004/11/23 02:28:17 (permalink)
    I agree with zataar about Addis Ababa in KCMO. I took my in-laws there this past summer, hoping that they would like it. I took the risk and they loved it, it's in a neat area filled with other international restaurants. Closest to where I live is in Nashville, TN
    #16
    Jennie
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    RE: Ethiopian 2004/11/27 12:40:38 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by meowzart

    I second Marber. DC has great Ethiopian eateries, and if you go to the Adams Morgan neighborhood, you could easily do an Ethiopian eat-around. I like Dukem, too, and also Meskerem.


    A washingtonpost.com search yielded 11 Ethiopian restaurants in the D.C. area. This is Tom Sietsema's review of Dukem:

    You don't get forks or knives; as is typical of Ethiopian dining, the food at Dukem is eaten with fingers and pieces of injera, the slightly sour crepe that also stands in for a plate. If you're a novice, be advised: No staff member I encountered at this corner dining room spoke much English, if any. But pointing and enlisting the help of native Ethiopian customers, who seem to treat this as a community center as much as a place to eat, can land you some pleasant memories to take back home. One signature is kitfo, a mound of raw ground beef blended with house-made cottage cheese, herbed butter and hot red pepper. Imagine steak tartare mixed with fire. You don't have to be a carnivore to eat well, though. Follow the lead of seemingly every other table and request the vegetable combination: Out comes a floppy round of injera, dolloped with a variety of earth-toned dishes, from chopped greens and yellow lentils to a tomato salad sparked with jalapenos. Afternoon soap operas and CNN on TV yield to live Ethiopian music onstage Thursday through Monday evenings.
    -- Tom Sietsema


    Eve Zibart's review of Meaza says this of the injera and teff:

    the injera at Arlington's Meaza -- injeras, in fact, the darker made entirely of teff and the paler half teff, half whole wheat -- has reconciled me to what can only be called the white-breading of many Washington Ethiopian restaurants. That, and the tripe.

    "Bread" is almost universal shorthand for sustenance, both spiritual and physical; and in few cuisines is it more central than Ethiopian, where the injera, the large, soft pancake that is torn up and dipped bite by bite into the dishes, serves as plate, utensil and napkin as well as bread. Consequently, even a meal of the most exquisite lentil stew on humdrum injera quickly goes flat.

    Teff, the small but nutritionally potent grain traditionally used for making injera, is expensive to import, and most Ethiopian kitchens and injera bakeries in the area have switched to part-teff blends or use buckwheat and other similarly sour doughs instead. (Injera is as pure a dough as it comes, with flour, water and a few days' fermenting, which gives it both the spongy, air-bubbly texture and the distinctively pungent flavor.) But none is quite as puckery, or as dark brown, as pure teff, and for those who love the real stuff, the teff injera at Meaza, though no longer made in-house, is as good as it comes, great pizza-size pancakes for $5 an order (about a half-dozen!). Even the half whole wheat, which comes standard unless you request the other, is better than most.


    She loved Meaza, by the way, although she notes that the kitchen is "American-wary", and tends to backpedal on the spices a bit. Reading other reviews on the washingtonpost website, this seems to be true of an otherwise interesting-looking Nepalese/Tibetan restaurant called Himalayan Grill. Shame.

    P.S. Here's a real groaner of a name for you. http://www.thegrillfromipanema.com/ " />
    #17
    mapenzim
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    RE: Ethiopian 2004/12/20 19:42:35 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by kland01s

    Theres a place in Chicago called Ethiopian Village. I've always wanted to try it, it gets good reviews. I believe it's in the Wrigleyville area.
    #18
    The Scarlet Pumpernickel
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    RE: Ethiopian 2005/01/31 10:54:58 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by mtbuckingham

    The flat bread is called injera, I believe. I've only been to Meskerem in Adams Morgan, DC- my first (and only) experience was good, but next time I'll go with fellow meat eaters (my vegetarian friend and I shared a meal). I really have no excuse not to go more, as it's in my backyard. I have to get over my mild dislike of sour-tasting spongy bread.


    I've ony eaten at one Ethiopian restaurant, and all of the food came wrapped in that disgusting injira. I tried scraping it off into a bowl, but the spongy bread had absorbed all of the sauce. If the entrees had been served with a side or rice or by themselves they would have been palatable.
    #19
    carlton pierre
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    RE: Ethiopian 2005/01/31 18:59:33 (permalink)
    May have been good for you, Scarlet P, but then it would not have been Ethiopian. Suggest you give it another try sometime. The "bread" is really good. Give it a try.
    #20
    the Big Ferret
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    RE: Ethiopian 2005/02/18 07:57:50 (permalink)
    I've been eating at Bahir Dar, which opened last summer in downtown Hampton, Virginia. I thrilled the Tidewater area finally has a restaurant and I no longer have to go to DC.
    #21
    rbpalmer
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    RE: Ethiopian 2005/02/18 08:11:43 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by Jennie


    P.S. Here's a real groaner of a name for you. http://www.thegrillfromipanema.com/ " />


    A corny name, but a good Brazilian/South American restaurant.
    #22
    carlton pierre
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    RE: Ethiopian 2005/02/18 10:57:47 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by the Big Ferret

    I've been eating at Bahir Dar, which opened last summer in downtown Hampton, Virginia. I thrilled the Tidewater area finally has a restaurant and I no longer have to go to DC.


    Big Feret, please let me know the whereabout so f this place in Hampton. I'm in Hampton Roads area quite a bit and and would love to know the location of this place.
    #23
    the Big Ferret
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    RE: Ethiopian 2005/02/18 12:10:52 (permalink)
    Carlton, it's at 17 East Queensway in the old downtown. You would take the exit for Hampton Univeristy of I-64. It's on a little street behind some banks and is close to the Virginia Air and Space museum.

    Here a bit of information from the Newport News paper:
    http://www.dailypress.com/entertainment/55990,0,2745178.venue
    #24
    carlton pierre
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    RE: Ethiopian 2005/02/18 14:23:37 (permalink)
    Ferret, thanks so much. I was just there last week and wished I had known of this place. Ethiopian food is an interesting experience and a fun way to share food and conversation with friends.
    #25
    TJ Jackson
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    RE: Ethiopian 2005/02/18 14:27:14 (permalink)
    Couple of places to share with you in Cincinnati, CP

    http://www.cincinnati.com/freetime/dining/reviews/103103_african.html
    #26
    carlton pierre
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    RE: Ethiopian 2005/02/18 15:21:47 (permalink)
    TJ, thanks for sharing those places in Cincy. I hope I get to try them out!!! They are West African, though, and that is not the same as Ethiopian. I've eaten west African food, in Charlotte, NC, as a matter of fact. Go figure. Anyway, it was quite good. I went to the same place 2 nights in a row.
    Do you care for much ethnic food yourself? Would you be tempted to try either one of these places?
    #27
    TJ Jackson
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    RE: Ethiopian 2005/02/18 15:29:01 (permalink)
    I'm not into african food, but who knows, I may try one one of these days and will be sure to share the experience here.

    Oddly, i recall Teranga having some Ethiopian descriptor attached to it. ah well.
    #28
    carlton pierre
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    RE: Ethiopian 2005/02/18 17:06:12 (permalink)
    Yeah, but how 'bout Thai, Japanese, Indian, Vietnamese, etc.?
    #29
    TJ Jackson
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    RE: Ethiopian 2005/02/18 17:17:52 (permalink)
    Slowly expanding into those things. I do have my limitations, though, as to what I can eat and/or will eat, so I check ingredients carefully when I order ethnic food until I am comfortable with it.

    The wife is even more limited than I, so exploring new things has to come on my own time, which limits me further.
    #30
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