False Geographical Food Etymology

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bartl
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2011/11/07 10:20:24 (permalink)

False Geographical Food Etymology

One thing that a lot of Road Food has in common: it's named for places where the item in question is virtually unknown. For example, "Coney" style hot dogs that have nothing to do with anything that was traditionally served in Coney Island (or made of rabbit meat, either). Or the New Jersey "Texas Style" hot dogs which my Texan friends (as well as our esteemed hosts) assure us have nothing to do with Texas. I grew up in New York, and I remember, in my early travels, wondering what the hell was a "New York Cut Steak"?
 
So, what food items do you know of that are named for a place where that item is virtually unknown?
 
Bart
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23 Replies Related Threads

    kland01s
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    Re:False Geographical Food Etymology 2011/11/07 10:45:34 (permalink)
    Oops...... posted in wrong thread.  
    post edited by kland01s - 2011/11/07 11:13:58
    #2
    wanderingjew
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    Re:False Geographical Food Etymology 2011/11/07 11:15:02 (permalink)
    "NY System Weiners" found here in Rhode Island have nothing to do with NY
    #3
    buffetbuster
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    Re:False Geographical Food Etymology 2011/11/07 11:21:45 (permalink)
    West Indies salad was invented and is readily available in the Mobile, AL area.
    #4
    wanderingjew
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    Re:False Geographical Food Etymology 2011/11/07 14:13:10 (permalink)
    And of course you can only enjoy "St Pauls" in St Louis
    #5
    Glenn1234
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    Re:False Geographical Food Etymology 2011/11/07 14:59:19 (permalink)
     
    I'm not sure if this is in line with the spirit of this topic, but ....
    It seems that many places around the country claim to have "Philly Style" cheesesteaks, but many of those so-called "Philly-style" cheesesteak places serve their cheesesteaks with lettuce, tomato, and mayo as standard toppings.  
    No self-respecting Philadelphian puts lettuce, tomato, or mayo on a Philly cheesessteak.    Those ingredients go on a "Hoagie", not on a traditional Philly cheesesteak. 
     
    Glenn
     
        
    #6
    Foodbme
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    Re:False Geographical Food Etymology 2011/11/08 02:40:26 (permalink)
    Boston Baked Beans Candy is actually made in Forest Park, IL!
    Moon Pies originated in Chattanooga, TN, not on the moon!
    French Fries actually originated in Belgium!
    Boston Cream Pie is actually a cake!
    Cumin is not a Mexican spice, as many believe, but a Middle Eastern Spice.
    #7
    ken8038
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    Re:False Geographical Food Etymology 2011/11/08 08:49:44 (permalink)
    In Union and Somerset Counties here in NJ we have Disco Fries, which are not available in Discos but in Diners. It's basically French Fries or Steak Fries with Brown Gravy. The name presumably comes from something you ordered in a Diner late at night AFTER going to the Disco. Disco is dead, but the name Disco Fries lives on.
    #8
    Michael Hoffman
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    Re:False Geographical Food Etymology 2011/11/08 09:14:31 (permalink)
    bartl

    One thing that a lot of Road Food has in common: it's named for places where the item in question is virtually unknown. For example, "Coney" style hot dogs that have nothing to do with anything that was traditionally served in Coney Island (or made of rabbit meat, either). Or the New Jersey "Texas Style" hot dogs which my Texan friends (as well as our esteemed hosts) assure us have nothing to do with Texas. I grew up in New York, and I remember, in my early travels, wondering what the hell was a "New York Cut Steak"?

    Bart

    Ah, but the Coney, as it is known today, never had anything to do with the Coney Island in New. York. It's from the Coney island Amusment Park in Cincinnati, where Greek meat sauce -- known now in the Cincinnati area as chili -- was first put on hot dogs

    #9
    Foodbme
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    Re:False Geographical Food Etymology 2011/11/08 20:08:48 (permalink)
    Haas Avocados from Mexico.
     
    Here's The Official Hass Avocado Board Guacamole Recipe

    Start with 3 ripe, Hass Avocados mashed to a chunky consistency in a bowl,

    take 1 additional Hass Avocado and dice it; set it aside.

    Additional ingredients needed:

    • 1 Tbsp. fresh lemon juice

    • ½ small sweet white onion, minced

    • 1 ripe Roma tomato, seeded, diced
    • 2 serrrano peppers, seeded if desired, diced
    • Cilantro, chopped, optional
    • Salt and pepper, to taste
      Gently stir in the 1 tablespoon of lemon juice; this will help the guacamole to stay fresh and balance the flavor. Mix in onion, tomatoes and peppers. Cilantro is optional. Add salt and pepper to taste.
      Gently stir in the diced avocado to the mixture.
      You're ready to serve!
    post edited by Foodbme - 2011/11/08 20:10:40
    #10
    quijote
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    Re:False Geographical Food Etymology 2011/11/08 20:38:06 (permalink)
    * Perhaps the "New York System" hot dogs in Rhode Island?
    * Maybe the St. Paul sandwich attributed to St. Louis, MO?
    * Perhaps Brunswick stew? (It's up for debate, anyhow.)
    * German Chocolate Cake (it isn't German, but a brand of chocolate called German's was used in the original recipe)
    * Spanish omelet (bears no resemblance to anything Spanish that I've seen)
    * Denver omelet?
    * Is Dutch lettuce really Dutch?
    * Jordan almonds?
    * Hawaiian Punch and Tahitian Treat sodas
    #11
    mar52
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    Re:False Geographical Food Etymology 2011/11/08 23:49:16 (permalink)
    Vienna Sausage?
     
    Polish Sausage?
     
    Don't they just call them sausage in those places?
     
    Philadelphia Cream Cheese was named because it would sell better.
     
     
    #12
    Foodbme
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    Re:False Geographical Food Etymology 2011/11/09 02:50:42 (permalink)
    There's no corn in Corned Beef
     
    #13
    jimcor
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    Re:False Geographical Food Etymology 2011/11/09 09:32:42 (permalink)
    ...and of course Texas Pete Hot Sauce, which I like very much , is made in North Carolina.
    post edited by jimcor - 2011/11/09 09:38:49
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    jimcor
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    Re:False Geographical Food Etymology 2011/11/09 09:49:21 (permalink)
    Michael Hoffman

    bartl

    One thing that a lot of Road Food has in common: it's named for places where the item in question is virtually unknown. For example, "Coney" style hot dogs that have nothing to do with anything that was traditionally served in Coney Island (or made of rabbit meat, either). Or the New Jersey "Texas Style" hot dogs which my Texan friends (as well as our esteemed hosts) assure us have nothing to do with Texas. I grew up in New York, and I remember, in my early travels, wondering what the hell was a "New York Cut Steak"?

    Bart

    Ah, but the Coney, as it is known today, never had anything to do with the Coney Island in New. York. It's from the Coney island Amusment Park in Cincinnati, where Greek meat sauce -- known now in the Cincinnati area as chili -- was first put on hot dogs

     
    Yep, I agree.
     
    The Coney Island Amusement park in Cincy, home of the Wildcat and the Shooting Star roller coasters and the marvelous Tumble Bug which was an engineering thing of beauty.
     
    We apologize for this interuption.
    Now back to your regularly scheduled thread 

    #15
    ann peeples
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    Re:False Geographical Food Etymology 2011/11/09 19:56:43 (permalink)
    Got hooked on Texas Pete while in North Carolina!!
    #16
    BackRhodes
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    Re:False Geographical Food Etymology 2011/11/09 22:09:21 (permalink)
    French Fries...
     
    Texas bbq in Sonora, CA...
     
    I'm a NATIVE of California, and in all my years I have NO idea where the term California Cuisine came from...it simply didn't exist until somebody in an urban area thought it up...Alice Waters...???  maybe from somebody in Noo Yawk Citee...???  The food we ate in the 50's and 60's was simply "ranch food"  (steak and taters)  and Italian...
     
    At least Golden Grain's "Rice-A-Roni - the San Francisco Treat"  DOES have roots in the SF Bay Area - owned by the DeDeminico family (or at least it was when I was a kid)  I went to school with one of the daughters, and to college with one of the daughters-in-law...they also own (or owned) Ghiradelli Chocolate...last I heard Paul DeDeminico lived in the Fremont area...it's possible it has since been swallowed up by a big corporate outfit...
    #17
    Michael Hoffman
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    Re:False Geographical Food Etymology 2011/11/11 13:18:26 (permalink)
    Foodbme

    There's no corn in Corned Beef


    Tell that to the people who corn their beef with salt. The word is from the Anglo-Saxon word for granule -- as in granules, or corns, of salt.
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    BelleReve
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    Re:False Geographical Food Etymology 2011/11/11 13:47:02 (permalink)
    Texas toast - where did that come from?  For years, NOLA seafood restaurants have been making seafood loaves, and loaf type sandwiches, and it's a sure bet there's nothing referring to Texas on their menus.  A loaf of white bread is toasted, the top cut off, the insides hollowed out then  buttered and filled with fried oysters or shrimp, or a combination.  Cassemento's restaurant takes that same bread and makes "loaf" type sandwiches on thick sliced and toasted bread, filled with fried seafood. 
    #19
    Buffalo Tarheel
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    Re:False Geographical Food Etymology 2011/11/11 15:32:09 (permalink)
    ann peeples

    Got hooked on Texas Pete while in North Carolina!!

    Texas Pete chili (which has no meat in it) was my favorite when growing up in North Carolina.  It still turns out pretty good on a Sahlen's hot dog here in Buffalo, despite mixing the two geographies.
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    Foodbme
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    Re:False Geographical Food Etymology 2011/11/11 15:51:09 (permalink)
    Michael Hoffman
    Foodbme
    There's no corn in Corned Beef

    Tell that to the people who corn their beef with salt. The word is from the Anglo-Saxon word for granule -- as in granules, or corns, of salt.

    Your knowledge is only exceeded by your good looks!
    #21
    Foodbme
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    Re:False Geographical Food Etymology 2011/11/11 15:58:52 (permalink)
    Buffalo Tarheel
    ann peeples
    Got hooked on Texas Pete while in North Carolina!!

    Texas Pete chili (which has no meat in it) was my favorite when growing up in North Carolina.  It still turns out pretty good on a Sahlen's hot dog here in Buffalo, despite mixing the two geographies.

    Has no meat in it???? Then it ain't no Chili Sauce!!! It's a Vegetarian, soy based product! UGH!
    Ain't no Damn CHILI Sauce!
    http://www.texaspete.com/products/chili-sauce/index.php
    #22
    Buffalo Tarheel
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    Re:False Geographical Food Etymology 2011/11/11 20:13:11 (permalink)
    Foodbme

    Buffalo Tarheel
    ann peeples
    Got hooked on Texas Pete while in North Carolina!!

    Texas Pete chili (which has no meat in it) was my favorite when growing up in North Carolina.  It still turns out pretty good on a Sahlen's hot dog here in Buffalo, despite mixing the two geographies.

    Has no meat in it???? Then it ain't no Chili Sauce!!! It's a Vegetarian, soy based product! UGH!
    Ain't no Damn CHILI Sauce!
    http://www.texaspete.com/products/chili-sauce/index.php

    I know, but it tastes so good.  Just like the ersatz Mexican food from Mighty Taco here in Buffalo, but that's another story.
    #23
    jimcor
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    Re:False Geographical Food Etymology 2011/11/11 21:55:34 (permalink)
    Buffalo Tarheel

    Foodbme

    Buffalo Tarheel
    ann peeples
    Got hooked on Texas Pete while in North Carolina!!

    Texas Pete chili (which has no meat in it) was my favorite when growing up in North Carolina.  It still turns out pretty good on a Sahlen's hot dog here in Buffalo, despite mixing the two geographies.

    Has no meat in it???? Then it ain't no Chili Sauce!!! It's a Vegetarian, soy based product! UGH!
    Ain't no Damn CHILI Sauce!
    http://www.texaspete.com/products/chili-sauce/index.php

    I know, but it tastes so good.  Just like the ersatz Mexican food from Mighty Taco here in Buffalo, but that's another story.

     
    Texas Pete chili sauce is different that's for sure. First time I tried it I was expecting a more Morton House or American Beauty style dog sauce, beans and beef tallow. It's not bad, but it's not my favorite el cheapo hot dog sauce, usually have a can of it around just for kicks. Ah, none of this stuff is health food, but then it's not something I eat everyday. 

    post edited by jimcor - 2011/11/11 21:58:01
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