Fiddlehead Greens

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repartee
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2006/04/03 23:27:29 (permalink)

Fiddlehead Greens

Anybody got any thoughts on fiddlehead greens.

What do you think they taste like and how doyou cook them and........most importantly, aside from McCains does anybody do them frozen?
#1

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    Michael Hoffman
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    RE: Fiddlehead Greens 2006/04/03 23:49:22 (permalink)
    I've never seen them frozen. I don't happen to care for them a whole lot. I've sauteed them, steamed them, and even roasted them.
    #2
    Jimeats
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    RE: Fiddlehead Greens 2006/04/04 05:33:21 (permalink)
    I like them sauteed with a little lemmon zest and garlic. These furns must be cooked throughly they can be poisonus. They should be comming up about now, but we have had a dry March around here. Chow Jim
    #3
    tmiles
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    RE: Fiddlehead Greens 2010/04/30 05:23:44 (permalink)
    We bought some at Price Chopper yesterday. They are usually a once or twice a year thing for us, because the season is so short. The produce guy reported to my daughter that they are usually a quick sellout. When/if they see them chiefs often buy it all. Our local store gets just one case per season. They were 5.99/lb, but 1/4 lb was plenty for the 3 of us, so they are not as expensive as they look at first glance.
    #4
    seafarer john
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    RE: Fiddlehead Greens 2010/04/30 09:32:48 (permalink)
     We have fiddleheads once a year. I don't know why we continue to do so because we don't really like them all that much. We steam them and squeeze a little lemon on them and some butter.

    Cheers, John 
    #5
    Rusty246
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    RE: Fiddlehead Greens 2010/04/30 09:53:27 (permalink)
    Are these anything like a mustard, collard, turnip greens? I like all of these.  Reading the above posts I'm thinking not.  I've never seen or heard of them here.
    #6
    tiki
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    RE: Fiddlehead Greens 2010/04/30 11:52:28 (permalink)
    i like em blanched well and then saute them in olive oil with garlic --wild if i can get it---or wild onions and finished with lemon!
    #7
    Rusty246
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    RE: Fiddlehead Greens 2010/04/30 12:07:05 (permalink)
    Sounds like they may be more like ramps and that would be a"yuck" in my book.  I've never eaten ramps but I remember my Mother and Grandmother cooking them in W. Va when I was younger. P.U.

    I looked them up on the web, I was no where close with my assumptions.

    post edited by Rusty246 - 2010/04/30 12:22:09
    #8
    Michael Hoffman
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    RE: Fiddlehead Greens 2010/04/30 12:24:09 (permalink)
    You don't like ramps? How terrible for you.
    #9
    Ahi Mpls.
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    RE: Fiddlehead Greens 2010/04/30 15:17:56 (permalink)
     They are unfurled baby ferns...They taste like mowing the lawn smells.   
    #10
    Extreme Glow
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    RE: Fiddlehead Greens 2010/04/30 18:01:45 (permalink)
    Sauce magazine (St. Louis food scene) mentions them in the April issue.

    http://www.saucemagazine.com/a/1251

    #11
    chewingthefat
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    RE: Fiddlehead Greens 2010/05/01 12:24:25 (permalink)
    A pinch of Balsamic Vinegar to the finished product is a good thing.
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    wookman8
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    RE: Fiddlehead Greens 2010/05/02 22:05:35 (permalink)
    I eat a LOT of fiddleheads. Growing up in eastern Canada they are tradtionally boiled in salted water and served with freshly-caught trout (makes a great shore meal too in the spring). I like them with butter, s & p and often a squirt of lemon.
    #13
    tmiles
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    RE: Fiddlehead Greens 2010/05/10 18:00:23 (permalink)
    Rusty246

    Are these anything like a mustard, collard, turnip greens? I like all of these.  Reading the above posts I'm thinking not.  I've never seen or heard of them here.


    No, they are unique. They are a fern that is just coming up in the spring. Furled as they are, they look like the head of a fiddle, thus the name. They are a little crunchy, and although the flavor is different, I would compare the "mouth feel" to young asparagus.
    #14
    tmiles
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    RE: Fiddlehead Greens 2014/06/07 19:59:04 (permalink)
    ..........and the Maine fiddlehead season is here! Stop and Shop had some beauties today........wild gathered and fresh!!!! What a treat!
    #15
    buffetbuster
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    RE: Fiddlehead Greens 2014/06/07 21:41:22 (permalink)
    I just had them for the first time recently in Maine. 

    Tasted like asparagus to me.  I would definitely eat them again.
    #16
    Greymo
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    RE: Fiddlehead Greens 2014/06/07 21:53:51 (permalink)
    I can still remember the first time that I ate fiddlehead greens.  It was at a place called Marshlands Inn in Sackville, New Brunswick.  I fell in love with them and have only had them twice since then but would certainly love to have them again.
    #17
    lleechef
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    RE: Fiddlehead Greens 2014/06/07 22:42:59 (permalink)
    When I lived in Michigan I used to pick them.  Yes!  They do resemble asparagus in taste.  The arrival of fiddleheads and morels in MI meant that spring had truly arrived!  Oh, and also ramps.
    #18
    SeamusD
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    RE: Fiddlehead Greens 2014/06/09 15:26:54 (permalink)
    I saw them for the first time in my life in the grocery store last week. I've never had them, but would probably give them a try.
    #19
    JB-ME
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    RE: Fiddlehead Greens 2014/08/09 20:19:57 (permalink)
    buffetbuster
    I just had them for the first time recently in Maine. 

    Tasted like asparagus to me.  I would definitely eat them again.

    I agree that fiddleheads taste similar to asparagus, though how you cook them can make a big difference in how they taste--for good or ill. They are a real sign of spring, and, like locally-grown asparagus, only are around for a short time. They are available here in Maine in smaller grocery stores (like IGAs) and maybe larger ones, too, like Hannaford and Shaw's. Or, if you have some land and know where they grow, you can pick your own. A friend of mine had so many she froze some and maybe canned them, too. They are very nutrient-rich and yummy. This same friend demonstrated how to cook them for a church women's meeting years ago, and she served them to us very simply, steamed with butter, salt, and pepper. My first taste of them ever. A week or so later I went to a Camden restaurant (Peter Ott's), and they were on the menu as a vegetable special. Much fancier presentation and just as good as my friend's. My mother had never had them before the Camden meal, which is strange to me. She did harvest and cook dandelion greens from the lawn every spring before the mowing season began!
    post edited by JB-ME - 2014/08/10 14:44:09
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    Wintahaba
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    RE: Fiddlehead Greens 2014/08/09 20:49:15 (permalink)
    My grandfather would pick them from the banks of the Narraguagus river while fishing, as I under stand they grow after the thaw in the spring on river/creek/lake banks...a very short season. Always referred to as Fiddlehead Ferns in our family....very tasty seasonal treat.
    #21
    buffetbuster
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    RE: Fiddlehead Greens 2014/08/10 10:00:44 (permalink)
    JB-ME-
    You would probably be interested to know that those fiddleheads in the photo are from Helen's!
    #22
    JB-ME
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    RE: Fiddlehead Greens 2014/08/10 11:05:06 (permalink)
    buffetbuster
    JB-ME-
    You would probably be interested to know that those fiddleheads in the photo are from Helen's!

    Maybe some future spring you can again enjoy them at the newly-rebuilt Helen's. I did wonder which Maine restaurant served them to you. Thanks.
     
    post edited by JB-ME - 2014/08/10 11:32:26
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    wookman8
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    RE: Fiddlehead Greens 2014/09/13 11:11:11 (permalink)
    The OP asked if anyone did them frozen ... I have picked them since I was a child and we freeze them fresh (in the spring). You will find them growing near water since they are a fern. The only variety I have ever seen are called Ostrich Ferns. They are rolled up tightly when they first pop out (the plant makes a little "hill" and shoots come out of that) and they will be covered in a brown paperish skin. You snap the heads off leaving only a small piece of the stem attached. Once you get them home you dump them on a table and the cleaning begins. Each one must have that "paper" removed and any other debris. Then you soak them in heavily salted water (we just use the kitchen sink) for an hour or so. This will get rid of any insects ... they DO grow in the woods, people. Finally you blanch them for 2-3 minutes shocking in cold water, bag in portion sized bags depending on the size of your family and freeze. Be sure to save some fresh ones in a container of cold water in your fridge for use. I have eaten McCain frozen fiddleheads before (never at my home) and they are what they are ... a commercial product. Don't expect the same quality as handpicked and cleaned fiddleheads (although McCains are handpicked by local people ... as far as I know you can't grow them in a garden although I have seen a few in flowerbeds). As for one poster commenting about cooking them a long time or they will be poisonous ... I can use google as well as anyone else. If you wish to eat mushy fiddleheads by all means cook them as long as you like but I have literally eaten well over a thousand portions in my lifetime and never had any issues with boiling them for 5 minutes. Traditionally they are eaten (in New Brunswick where I grew up) with pan-fried trout but they go with any protein I have run across. I like them lightly salt & peppered with a liberal pat of butter and a squeeze of lemon juice. I have also tried a light sautee with some sliced garlic and that was nice as well. If cooking from frozen, empty the bag into a pot of boiling water. Once the water begins to boil again wait 5 minutes (I am not a food scientist or other professional ... just telling you what everyone where I come from does) drain and serve.
    post edited by wookman8 - 2014/09/13 11:48:32
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