"Flavored" beers

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Russ Jackson
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RE: "Flavored" beers 2008/03/02 10:32:28 (permalink)
First let me say that I think that Miller Chill is horrible. Tequiza was terrible also. Beer should be beer not something else. My wife on the other hand loves Blue Moon. As it is not horrible if it was the only thing available I would drink one....Russ

Was Zima Beer?
#31
leethebard
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RE: "Flavored" beers 2008/03/02 11:12:14 (permalink)
No!!
#32
hungryguy
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RE: "Flavored" beers 2008/03/02 11:49:32 (permalink)
I like the "Framboise" (raspberry flavored) from the local brewpubs in the Cleveland, Ohio area: "The Brew Kettle" and The "Cornerstone Brewng Company". Long before hops were used in beers the acidity came from fruits.
Jim
#33
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RE: "Flavored" beers 2008/03/02 16:36:38 (permalink)
Best beer I ever had was at a locals bar in San Fran, and it was a micro brew apricot beer. God that was delicious. It was one of the best meals I ever had, a bowl of smoked seafood chowder and a couple cold apricot beers.
#34
brentk
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RE: "Flavored" beers 2008/03/02 16:52:13 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by Cosmos

I once had a micro brewed hazelnut flavored beer that was awsome...I never found it again...forgot the name too. I had it at a fund raiser taste-off at the local YWCA in Cortland, NY...(I recall we took second place with our ground lamb dish).


You may be thinking of the Rogue Hazelnut Brown Nectar, which is an American Brown Ale flavored with hazelnut extract. It is distinctive and very drinkable and a great example of what craft brewers can accomplish using flavorings with a subtle hand to enhance the malt character.
#35
CookieMonster84
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RE: "Flavored" beers 2008/03/06 15:48:46 (permalink)
I think the Chelada sounds terriibbllleeee. It just sounds really disgusting and I bet it smells.
#36
SuperDave70
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RE: "Flavored" beers 2008/03/07 15:55:46 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by Porcelina

Best beer I ever had was at a locals bar in San Fran, and it was a micro brew apricot beer. God that was delicious. It was one of the best meals I ever had, a bowl of smoked seafood chowder and a couple cold apricot beers.


Pyramid Apricot Weizen is pretty good, and I think fairly widely available. Give it a try!
#37
SuperDave70
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RE: "Flavored" beers 2008/03/07 16:14:28 (permalink)
Probably my personal favorite isDogfish Head Punkin Ale. I think it's only available in the fall, at least here in AZ, but it is fantastic. Mild pumpkin flavor, some spices and brown sugar, and a decent alcohol bite for warming up those chilly fall nights. It is definately a must try!
#38
NYNM
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RE: "Flavored" beers 2008/06/13 20:09:37 (permalink)
I am now drinking a bottle of BluePoint Brewing Company Blueberry Ale.

Nice. Just a tad of blueberry taste, good for summer.
#39
leethebard
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RE: "Flavored" beers 2008/06/14 00:57:15 (permalink)
Sounds interesting..yes, and a nice idea for summer!!
#40
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RE: "Flavored" beers 2008/06/14 02:23:36 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by wheregreggeats.com

There is so much range in good beers that, IMO, we don't need the "enhancements".

quote:
Originally posted by jman

I don't understand why someone would want to ruin a good beer by flavoring it with anything. I like beer-flavored beer.

If push comes to shove, I'm with you two.
I like beer flavored beer, just like I prefer coffee flavored coffee.

I will admit though that after a long hike in the hills or roaming around on a Sunday, we will stop and let them pull the tap on a Watermelon Wheat, Peach Ale, Apricot Weizen, Blueberry Ale, or have a Black and Blue (usually with a Black and Blue Burger)

My excuse is, I'm pretty serious about driving intoxicated and those beers are lower in alch. and I would rather have them than a big corporate unflavored beer with the same alch % and also I get tired in the afternoon drinking the beer I like.

And they are refreshing. So how is that for flip-flopping ?

#41
mikeam
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RE: "Flavored" beers 2008/06/14 07:50:05 (permalink)
I had a very nice Pyramid apricot ale Thursday night. It was very refreshing on a hot evening.
#42
SRB
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RE: "Flavored" beers 2008/06/14 07:53:41 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by Guilty One

quote:
Originally posted by wheregreggeats.com

There is so much range in good beers that, IMO, we don't need the "enhancements".

quote:
Originally posted by jman

I don't understand why someone would want to ruin a good beer by flavoring it with anything. I like beer-flavored beer.

If push comes to shove, I'm with you two.
I like beer flavored beer, just like I prefer coffee flavored coffee.



I tend to agree with this sentiment, but the problem is that ALL beer is flavored beer! What we typically think of as "beer" flavor comes largely from the variety of hops that are used, and hops are a flavoring agent. They are not a necessary element of making fermented grain beverages. Their only purpose is to add flavor.

If you look at the history of beer, you find that all kinds of spices and flavorings have been added along the way, almost from the very beginning thousands of years ago. We've simply landed on hops as the way beer "should" taste in our day and age. Historically speaking, there's not much room for being a "purist" here.
#43
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RE: "Flavored" beers 2008/06/14 12:28:23 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by SRB

I tend to agree with this sentiment, but the problem is that ALL beer is flavored beer! What we typically think of as "beer" flavor comes largely from the variety of hops that are used, and hops are a flavoring agent. They are not a necessary element of making fermented grain beverages. Their only purpose is to add flavor.

If you look at the history of beer, you find that all kinds of spices and flavorings have been added along the way, almost from the very beginning thousands of years ago. We've simply landed on hops as the way beer "should" taste in our day and age. Historically speaking, there's not much room for being a "purist" here.


well said! I was going to mention the Berliners, who put a shot of fruit syrup in their Weisse.
#44
Poverty Pete
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RE: "Flavored" beers 2008/06/14 12:37:01 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by SRB

quote:
Originally posted by Guilty One

quote:
Originally posted by wheregreggeats.com

There is so much range in good beers that, IMO, we don't need the "enhancements".

quote:
Originally posted by jman

I don't understand why someone would want to ruin a good beer by flavoring it with anything. I like beer-flavored beer.

If push comes to shove, I'm with you two.
I like beer flavored beer, just like I prefer coffee flavored coffee.



I tend to agree with this sentiment, but the problem is that ALL beer is flavored beer! What we typically think of as "beer" flavor comes largely from the variety of hops that are used, and hops are a flavoring agent. They are not a necessary element of making fermented grain beverages. Their only purpose is to add flavor.

If you look at the history of beer, you find that all kinds of spices and flavorings have been added along the way, almost from the very beginning thousands of years ago. We've simply landed on hops as the way beer "should" taste in our day and age. Historically speaking, there's not much room for being a "purist" here.


Well, that's not exactly true. The fact that hops add flavor and bitterness is sort of incidental. The original purpose of hops was to prolong the storage of the beer. The alpha and beta acids in the hops serve to inhibit bacterial growth. Bacteria wasn't understood five hundred years ago, but experience proved that beer with hops lasted longer than beer without hops.
#45
Guilty One
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RE: "Flavored" beers 2008/06/14 19:21:06 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by SRB
ALL beer is flavored beer!

You're correct of course but I still think it's a different discussion (a valid one, but different)

Ever since my first India Pale Ale, all lagers are like refreshing water to me. I don't care if the hops were put there so the stash could last the boat ride to India.

I love the hoppy flavor. What some call bitterness, I think is fruity sweetness. Just like my Italian Roast that people think is bitter, I think it's sweet and full of flavor.

I also like Red and Copper but it has to be a micro brew even over a Chimay.
#46
Davydd
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RE: "Flavored" beers 2008/06/14 20:05:51 (permalink)
My preference is water, barley, hops and yeast and what can be done with those combinations. That goes back to 1487. I'm fine with those old protective curmudgeons in Germany and also the elimination of Budweiser as a beer.
#47
Poverty Pete
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RE: "Flavored" beers 2008/06/14 20:08:54 (permalink)
I suppose that if bitterness can be defined as sweetness, then there's no reason that an IPA can't be a refreshing lager.
#48
Guilty One
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RE: "Flavored" beers 2008/06/14 20:41:06 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by Davydd

My preference is water, barley, hops and yeast and what can be done with those combinations. That goes back to 1487. I'm fine with those old protective curmudgeons in Germany and also the elimination of Budweiser as a beer.

Sounds like your talking about some American knock-off.

How about taking a break from your See America travels and rent your own model camper in Germany.
You might enjoy a Budweiser.


#49
stevep
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RE: "Flavored" beers 2008/06/14 23:45:54 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by jeepguy

Maybe it's Cave Creek Chile Beer. It has a big jalapeno stuffed into the bottle. Pretty hot stuff when you get to the bottom!


Crazy Ed's, Cave Creek Chili Beer. Good stuff! I like to mix it with Mr T's bloody mary mix with a few XL cocktail olives.

http://www.chilibeer.com/

#50
SuperDave70
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RE: "Flavored" beers 2008/06/15 22:32:57 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by Guilty One

quote:
Originally posted by Davydd

My preference is water, barley, hops and yeast and what can be done with those combinations. That goes back to 1487. I'm fine with those old protective curmudgeons in Germany and also the elimination of Budweiser as a beer.

Sounds like your talking about some American knock-off.

How about taking a break from your See America travels and rent your own model camper in Germany.
You might enjoy a Budweiser.






Actually that beer is pretty widely available in the U.S. under the name Czechvar, (due to trademark issues with AB). Probably one of the best macro lagers around.
#51
NYNM
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RE: "Flavored" beers 2008/06/19 07:02:17 (permalink)
Just had some Bud Light with Lime. Boy, was that bad.

(watery, weak, just plain dumb)
#52
leethebard
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RE: "Flavored" beers 2008/06/19 07:20:54 (permalink)
The bud would be the watery and weak,adding lime to it would be the dumb!
#53
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RE: "Flavored" beers 2008/06/19 08:56:05 (permalink)
Beer has always been brewed with fruit long before the German Purity Laws defined what we now usually consider beer. New Glarus Brewery makes two of my favorites;


Wisconsin Belgian Red

You hold the marriage of wine and beer. Belgian Red is a tapestry of flavor. This beer is brewed with whole Montmorency Cherries, Wisconsin Farmed Wheat and Belgian Roasted Barleys, lagered in oak tanks and balanced by Hallertau hops we aged in our brewery one full year.

Over a pound of Door County Cherries in every bottle makes this beer uniquely "Wisconsin." So unique, in fact, that we applied for a patent. Expect this beer to be ruby red, with a medium body that is highly carbonated and intense with cherry flavor and bouquet. Serve your friends Belgian Red in a brandy snifter or champagne flute and toast life with beer from the land of Wisconsin.
and


Raspberry Tart

Treat yourself to a rare delight. The voluminous raspberry bouquet will greet you long before your lips touch your glass. Serve this Wisconsin framboise very cold in a champagne flute. Then hold your glass to a light and enjoy the jewel-like sparkle of a very special ale.

Oregon proudly shares their harvest of mouth watering berries, which we ferment spontaneously in large oak vats. Then we employ Wisconsin farmed wheat and year old Hallertau hops to round out this extravaganza of flavor.

And there's the Belgian Lambics that are highly thought of throughout the world although probably not to Miller, Coors and Bud drinkers:







Southwest of Brussels, in the quiet Belgian town of Vlezenbeek, the Lindemans family has been farming and homebrewing as long as anyone can remember. Commercial brewing started in 1811 in their barn-like brewery.

Lambic, or spontaneously fermented beers, are among the world’s rarest. Produced more like a methode champenoise champagne, than a typical beer, these products mature in oak for nearly two years prior to release.

Merchant du Vin introduced Lindemans lambics to the United States in 1979, making them the first lambics marketed in U. S. history. To this day, they remain both the best selling and most widely honored brand in the category; including being named "One of the Top Ten Breweries in the World" for four consecutive years.


Lambic Simplified

The romantic, mysterious, wild-fermented wheat beers of Belgium’s Flanders are among the world’s rarest beers. The unique natural combination of the Senne River valley; small hills with numerous cherry trees; small farms growing hops, barley and wheat; and wooden kegs with fermentation liquids, has given the region an air-disseminated microflora that has seeded farm breweries for more than 500 years.

The mashing process is very much the same as with other styles, except for the unique addition of 30 percent unmalted wheat to the malted barley. Whereas most brewers use the freshest hops during the boil, lambic brewers use aged hops to contribute preservative properties without the bitterness of the herb (this protection is important to the final product, since it is such a long process from start to finish). Singularly, in the world of brewing, no yeast is added to this beer. After the boil, lambic wort is transferred into a coolship (a large, shallow, copper vessel) that exposes the hot wort to the cool fresh air and wild yeast! The fermenting rooms are dark and filled with cobwebs and brewers dare not clean their brewing cellars for fear of losing the natural yeasts.

The beer is top-fermented by the wild yeast strains Brettanomyces bruxellensis and Brettanomyces lambicus, whereas most ales use the cultivated yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The yeast enters through louvers in the barn’s walls that are raised during the brewing season.

After fermentation, the beer is transferred into "hogsheads" (casks) for two summers of maturation. A second, slower fermentation takes place in the oak. After aging, the base lambic is treated in different ways to make different beers.

Without question, lambic is the world’s most unusual and some say best beer. Lambic is unique in that the brewing process often takes several years. Lambics are a complex family of beers, which include dry aperitif beers, full-bodied dinner beers and fruity dessert beers


#54
GNeedles59
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RE: "Flavored" beers 2008/06/19 09:23:45 (permalink)
I find pumpkin ale to be acceptable in the fall months. Longtrail makes a blackberry wheat beer that is pretty good. But I usually like my beer to taste like beer, like so many before me have stated...
#55
SuperDave70
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RE: "Flavored" beers 2008/06/19 15:16:06 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by MilwFoodlovers

Beer has always been brewed with fruit long before the German Purity Laws defined what we now usually consider beer. New Glarus Brewery makes two of my favorites;


Wisconsin Belgian Red


You are lucky to live in Wisconsin! The New Glarus Belgian Red is by far the best fruit/lambic I have tried, and pretty near the top of my favorite beers overall. (And this comes from a lover of the thick, dark imperial stouts.) I just wish someone would start importing it to AZ!
#56
Slim Strummer
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RE: "Flavored" beers 2008/06/19 15:39:38 (permalink)
Wachusett (sp?) makes a Blueberry Ale which I like to drink in the summertime.

To the purity point, I served it to an Austrian buddy of mine and he was appalled. Then he stared drinking an Amstel Light (which tastes like bong water to me), so go figure.
#57
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RE: "Flavored" beers 2008/06/19 16:33:39 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by Davydd

My preference is water, barley, hops and yeast and what can be done with those combinations. That goes back to 1487. I'm fine with those old protective curmudgeons in Germany...


except, that in Germany, Berlin in particular, to get around the purity laws, they add fruit syrup to their beer as common practice. So, while the beer may be brewed using limited ingredients, Germans still add other flavor to their beer.

Here in the US, we've gotten into the practice of adding some additional flavors into the brewing process for a better taste than merely dropping a shot of fruit syrup into the beer. Pumpkin, Cherry, Rasberry, spices, chocolate, etc, etc.

The German Purity Laws are great advertising, but that kind of limitation does not always yield the best beer.

Imagine, if there were a sandwich purity law that limited the ingredients to: ham, gruyere cheese, dijon mustard and crusty bread. Well, of course, there would many variations of the theme, from bread, to type of ham, to quality of cheese to quality of the mustard. An infinite number of combinations could be made from just these few ingredients. But in the end, it's still a ham sandwich. And the sandwich, as we all know, cannot be limited to just those flavors. What about the muffaletta? the reuben, the italian sub, the meatball sub, and on and on and on?

The German Purity Laws have their place for sure. But, the world of beer cannot be limited to the 500 year old laws of one country the size of Montana.
#58
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RE: "Flavored" beers 2008/06/27 19:38:05 (permalink)
I had a REALLY good one tonight: Shandy Ginger, which is beer with ginger (not ginger beer/ginger ale) from Trinidad. Yummmm

Our local deli is owned by some guys from Trinidad and they have some interesting thins. Home made goat roti, for example.

I plan to try their tropical shandy soon - beer improted from Trinidad with "passion flavours" hmmm....
#59
Mrs.Crunch
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RE: "Flavored" beers 2008/06/27 20:12:52 (permalink)
I had Watermelon beer at Beer Works the first time I was in Boston , it was delicious! A fews weeks back I saw that Rouge had a "chipotle" ale, surprisingly tasty! I also like the "Vanilla" porter by Breckenridge Brewery.
Great Lakes Oatmeal Stout is pretty darn good too
Cheers!
#60
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