Fondue

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Sandy Thruthegarden
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2005/11/26 09:08:23 (permalink)

Fondue

I guess this is international food, being Swiss. We're hooked on traditional cheese fondue (emmenthaler and gruyere)on cold evenings. We're having it tonight. We always have it with a salad of mixed baby greens topped with Brianna's Blush Wine Vinegarette and Bonnydoon Vineyard's Vin Gris de Cigare (a California blush wine). The sweetness of the Vinegarette and the blush wine compliment the nutty sweetness of the fondue.

We once fondued bits of steak in oil but found that it smoked up the house and didn't do anything special for the meat. We've talked about trying other types of cheeses but always settle on the traditional combination.

Any other fondue fans out there, and what's your favorite recipe?
#1

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    AndreaB
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    RE: Fondue 2005/11/29 16:54:38 (permalink)
    It is getting cold here too, so it's time for the fondue. We often make a beer cheese fondue with garlic, beer, Swiss cheese, sharp cheddar cheese, flour and a dash of hot pepper sauce, and enjoy it with dippers of crusty french bread and sausage balls, accompanied by a salad with a raspberry vinegarette and chopped walnuts.

    Andrea
    #2
    Macdaddy
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    RE: Fondue 2005/11/29 17:43:52 (permalink)
    Love Fondue,
    Try Finely chopping shallots, and carmelizing them in oil. I do about a half cup until they are brown and almost crispy. Stir them into your finished Swiss fondue for a great twist to a classic.
    #3
    Sundancer7
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    RE: Fondue 2005/11/29 18:17:16 (permalink)
    We have a fondue restaurant in Knoxville at the Old City. I like fondue but when I went in, the smell of the hot oil turned me off and I had to leave.

    Paul E. Smith
    Knoxville, TN
    #4
    Sandy Thruthegarden
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    RE: Fondue 2005/11/29 18:42:03 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by AndreaB

    It is getting cold here too, so it's time for the fondue. We often make a beer cheese fondue with garlic, beer, Swiss cheese, sharp cheddar cheese, flour and a dash of hot pepper sauce, and enjoy it with dippers of crusty french bread and sausage balls, accompanied by a salad with a raspberry vinegarette and chopped walnuts.

    Andrea


    Wow, that sounds good! Could you post the recipe with amounts of each ingredient? Do you use the beer like the Kirsch Wasser in traditional emmenthaler fondue?

    Thanks!
    #5
    Sandy Thruthegarden
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    RE: Fondue 2005/11/29 18:47:30 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by Macdaddy

    Love Fondue,
    Try Finely chopping shallots, and carmelizing them in oil. I do about a half cup until they are brown and almost crispy. Stir them into your finished Swiss fondue for a great twist to a classic.


    I love the extra flavor shallots bring to a dish but never thought of adding them to fondue. We'll have to try that next time.
    #6
    lleechef
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    RE: Fondue 2005/11/30 12:22:13 (permalink)
    Try making raclette, it's even better than fondue. This is a dish from the French and Swiss alps. The verb "racler" means "to scrape" so the French and Swiss would set a half wheel of Raclette cheese in front of the fireplace and then scrape off the melted cheese onto a plate, to be eaten with baguette, butter, prosciutto (jambon de Parme), cornichons, pickled onions, fingerling potatoes and a fruity white wine. We have an apparatus that has an electric broiler element with a griddle on top. You put the raclette pieces in Teflon pans, melt it under the broiler, while the griddle keeps the potatoes hot.
    At the restaurant we make Gorgonzola fondue.......Gorgonzola, cream cheese, roasted garlic, white wine, parmesan.
    #7
    Michael Hoffman
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    RE: Fondue 2005/11/30 12:50:42 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by lleechef

    Try making raclette, it's even better than fondue. This is a dish from the French and Swiss alps. The verb "racler" means "to scrape" so the French and Swiss would set a half wheel of Raclette cheese in front of the fireplace and then scrape off the melted cheese onto a plate, to be eaten with baguette, butter, prosciutto (jambon de Parme), cornichons, pickled onions, fingerling potatoes and a fruity white wine. We have an apparatus that has an electric broiler element with a griddle on top. You put the raclette pieces in Teflon pans, melt it under the broiler, while the griddle keeps the potatoes hot.
    At the restaurant we make Gorgonzola fondue.......Gorgonzola, cream cheese, roasted garlic, white wine, parmesan.

    I haven't had raclette in years. We used to have it with potatoes and cornichons and prociutto, and do it by the fire. Thanks for the memory. By the way, that gorgonzola fondue sounds delicious.
    #8
    roossy90
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    RE: Fondue 2005/11/30 19:55:07 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by Sandy Thruthegarden

    I guess this is international food, being Swiss. We're hooked on traditional cheese fondue (emmenthaler and gruyere)on cold evenings. We're having it tonight. We always have it with a salad of mixed baby greens topped with Brianna's Blush Wine Vinegarette and Bonnydoon Vineyard's Vin Gris de Cigare (a California blush wine). The sweetness of the Vinegarette and the blush wine compliment the nutty sweetness of the fondue.

    We once fondued bits of steak in oil but found that it smoked up the house and didn't do anything special for the meat. We've talked about trying other types of cheeses but always settle on the traditional combination.

    Any other fondue fans out there, and what's your favorite recipe?


    There is a Time Share/Hotel in Cocoa Beach called "Discovery Beach", and the restaurant is run by a Swiss couple, and they have fondue night every thursday nights, and they are always packed.. they do a 3 course...standard, and boy oh boy.. they are so good...
    If anyone ever gets down that way, make sure you make a reservation, as they do it that way......
    #9
    Sandy Thruthegarden
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    RE: Fondue 2006/01/21 09:55:40 (permalink)
    Does anyone know if it's possible to substitute Appenzeller cheese for Ementhaler in a classic cheese fondue (usually Ementhaler and Gruyere)? I came across a particularly sweet and nutty Appenzeller at bigg's and think that it might be good in fondue. I wonder if it would blend the same way Ementhaler does since it seemed slightly softer. Our fondue recipe book contains no recipes with Appenzeller but I found a website that sells pre-made Appenzeller fondue.

    TIA for any comments or suggestions.
    #10
    BT
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    RE: Fondue 2006/01/21 14:06:29 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by Sandy Thruthegarden

    Does anyone know if it's possible to substitute Appenzeller cheese for Ementhaler in a classic cheese fondue (usually Ementhaler and Gruyere)? I came across a particularly sweet and nutty Appenzeller at bigg's and think that it might be good in fondue. I wonder if it would blend the same way Ementhaler does since it seemed slightly softer.


    From the "Flavors of Switzerland" web site:

    quote:
    The fondue that is called "moitié-moitié" or "half and half," referring to the proportions of cheese, is made with Emmenthal and Gruyère, but in other regions they use Emmenthal, Gruyère and Vacherin fribourgeois. This last cheese should be added at the very end. The combination of cheeses is very important: you need both a fat cheese and a drier, salty cheese in order for the mixture to bind well.
    According to other Swiss people, the half-and-half fondue is made solely with Gruyère and Vacherin fribourgeois - perhaps because they live in that lovely region!

    Some preparation tips
    It's best to have several pieces of vacherin of varying ages, meaning pieces with varying intensity of flavour. The same goes for the Gruyère.

    If you have a good blend there's no need to add cornstarch and baking soda. When you have the proper mixture you'll end up with a smooth creamy fondue that should not be stringy.

    If, unfortunately, you have a cheese that separates or becomes oily on the surface, usually you need only increase the heat a bit and stir more vigorously - or add a little wine. Remember you can always add more wine, but you can't take it out!


    I'm not very familiar with Appenzeller, but I take this to mean that if it is similar to either Gruyere or Emmenthaler on the fat and dry/salty scales, it should work as a substitute. Personally, as long as you like the flavor I think you could make it work, using the alcohol trick if you get too much oil.
    #11
    Blower
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    RE: Fondue 2006/03/12 02:00:34 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by AndreaB

    It is getting cold here too, so it's time for the fondue. We often make a beer cheese fondue with garlic, beer, Swiss cheese, sharp cheddar cheese, flour and a dash of hot pepper sauce, and enjoy it with dippers of crusty french bread and sausage balls, accompanied by a salad with a raspberry vinegarette and chopped walnuts.

    Andrea


    +1

    I make the beer cheddar garlic version more often than the traditional. For another twist, try adding a smoked cheese (Smoked: cheddar, gouda, fontina, provalone all good additions)into that combination.

    #12
    curried bluebonnet
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    RE: Fondue 2006/04/25 00:47:25 (permalink)
    Mom and Dad were big into fondue in the late 60's early 70's, doing meat, traditional cheese,a nd chocolate. I started making all the sauces (thought I was so gourmet) at a very young age--bordelaise, etc. Just found raclette a few years ago and enjoy it, though the old gruyere is still my favortie. Any specific wilne recommendations for this or raclette?
    #13
    littleanomaly
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    RE: Fondue 2006/07/13 17:11:30 (permalink)
    Look at this places menu. It's completely fondue, I'm sure that you can figure out what they're using and do the same at home.

    http://www.meltingpot.com/


    And here is my dessert..
    #14
    AndreaB
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    RE: Fondue 2006/07/16 10:26:35 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by Sandy Thruthegarden

    quote:
    Originally posted by AndreaB

    It is getting cold here too, so it's time for the fondue. We often make a beer cheese fondue with garlic, beer, Swiss cheese, sharp cheddar cheese, flour and a dash of hot pepper sauce, and enjoy it with dippers of crusty french bread and sausage balls, accompanied by a salad with a raspberry vinegarette and chopped walnuts.

    Andrea


    Wow, that sounds good! Could you post the recipe with amounts of each ingredient? Do you use the beer like the Kirsch Wasser in traditional emmenthaler fondue?

    Thanks!


    It is redneck fondue, and we usually just throw in whatever beer's on hand. There's no specific recipe (though I forgot to mention we use heavy cream as well) and we just mix it all up until it tastes good using this 'n that. If we have them, we put scallions in as well! It is good whether or not you leave out the swiss. Next time we make it I'll post the quantity and what we used of what!

    Andrea
    #15
    Sandy Thruthegarden
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    RE: Fondue 2006/07/16 19:29:16 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by AndreaB

    quote:
    Originally posted by Sandy Thruthegarden

    quote:
    Originally posted by AndreaB

    It is getting cold here too, so it's time for the fondue. We often make a beer cheese fondue with garlic, beer, Swiss cheese, sharp cheddar cheese, flour and a dash of hot pepper sauce, and enjoy it with dippers of crusty french bread and sausage balls, accompanied by a salad with a raspberry vinegarette and chopped walnuts.

    Andrea


    Wow, that sounds good! Could you post the recipe with amounts of each ingredient? Do you use the beer like the Kirsch Wasser in traditional emmenthaler fondue?

    Thanks!


    It is redneck fondue, and we usually just throw in whatever beer's on hand. There's no specific recipe (though I forgot to mention we use heavy cream as well) and we just mix it all up until it tastes good using this 'n that. If we have them, we put scallions in as well! It is good whether or not you leave out the swiss. Next time we make it I'll post the quantity and what we used of what!

    Andrea


    Please do. It really sounds good. No hurry though; it was 93 degrees here today. By the way, do you drink any particular beer with that? I imagine a dark German beer would be good.

    Sandy
    #16
    IansMom
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    RE: Fondue 2006/07/17 08:48:41 (permalink)
    Is there a way to make Fondue without the beer or wine?
    #17
    zataar
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    RE: Fondue 2006/07/17 09:03:33 (permalink)
    I have seen some recipes that used apple juice instead of wine, for those who don't wish to use or can't use alcohol. As long as it isn't too sweet I think it would work, maybe white grape juice. Natural juice that doesn't contain HFCS would be best.
    #18
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