Food Science

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salindgren
Cheeseburger
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2008/01/06 01:12:25 (permalink)

Food Science

I guess this goes here, let me know if it belongs somewhere else.
In a post about Tater Tots, I just pointed out that restaurants save a little of their old shortening when they put in a fresh batch. The little bit of old oil changes the chemistry of the fresh in a good way. This is why when you use straight fresh oil for fried stuff at home, it does not taste like it does at a restaurant.
Also, and this is from another article in the LA Times, freezing breads is OK, does not harm them, but putting them in the fridge is bad. That temperature range causes unfortunate chemical changes that do not occur at room or freezing temps. The fridge might help control mold, but the freezer does better, and does not mess up the bread's flavor, which you are nowadays paying a lot for. The sourdough I like (Francisco) is heading toward $4/loaf.
-Scott Lindgren scottlindgren@netzero.net
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    UncleVic
    Sirloin
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    RE: Food Science 2008/01/06 01:47:37 (permalink)
    Now this is a first for me.. (With the exception of that one hamburger place here that has used their burger grease for decades.. I believe the place is called Dyers, somewhere down south).. I hope your not talking about oil for deep fryers? Old oil will cause the new oil to break down far quicker (along with being science, this is fact). You must be picturing the residual flavor in the oils that enhance the food flavors, and never had to pay for the gallons of oil that go in a fryer while trying to extend its life to the max..

    Edit: My memory served me good, it is Dyer's: http://www.roadfood.com/Reviews/Overview.aspx?RefID=1251
    #2
    salindgren
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    RE: Food Science 2008/01/06 22:57:43 (permalink)
    To UncleVic: Yes, I am talking about big fryalaters. The ones that hold gallons of shortening. I spent time draining and refilling those things years ago. You drain it, get all the little bits of loose breading or whatever out, MAYBE do some kind of soapy washout and rinse it (the leftover water boils away explosively) then you turn on the burner and start throwing huge blocks of shortening in there. I would imagine that most 24 hr operations have two fryers so they can service one or the other in off-peak hours.
    Now, the article I read about saving a ladle of the old oil is from the LA Times, and I don't think they were pulling our legs about this. They explained the science underlying this practice. You may be right about old oil causing new oil to break down more quickly, but...when you are frying mass quantities of whatever, you will be changing the oil pretty frequently, and I think the concept is to maintain a consistent flavor from batch to batch. Anybody else know about this?
    -Scott Lindgren
    #3
    Big_g
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    RE: Food Science 2008/01/06 23:31:12 (permalink)
    In the 6 different restaurants I worked in, one that had 5 35 gal fryers, No body put old oil into the fresh. We used FryMax and filtered the oil twice a day and always rotated the oil....The freshest oil was for frys and appitizers, next two oldest were used for fish and tenderloins, and the next oldest was used for fried chicken. We used a color chart developed by the manufacturer and could get 3 + weeks out of one 35 gal. bucket of oil.
    I think your LA Times people are talking about something they have little knowledge about.
    My .02 YMMV.
    #4
    Sundancer7
    Fire Safety Admin
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    RE: Food Science 2008/01/07 05:50:19 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by UncleVic

    Now this is a first for me.. (With the exception of that one hamburger place here that has used their burger grease for decades.. I believe the place is called Dyers, somewhere down south).. I hope your not talking about oil for deep fryers? Old oil will cause the new oil to break down far quicker (along with being science, this is fact). You must be picturing the residual flavor in the oils that enhance the food flavors, and never had to pay for the gallons of oil that go in a fryer while trying to extend its life to the max..

    Edit: My memory served me good, it is Dyer's: http://www.roadfood.com/Reviews/Overview.aspx?RefID=1251



    The Mayor, Poverty, Tiki, Iwannago, Janet and I ate at Dyers a few years ago. I do not think the Mayor cared for the burger but the rest of us did.

    Paul E. Smith
    Knoxville, TN
    #5
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