Full English Breakfast

Page: < 12 Showing page 2 of 2
Author
Sundancer7
Fire Safety Admin
  • Total Posts : 13473
  • Joined: 2001/07/18 14:10:00
  • Location: Knoxville, TN,
  • Status: offline
RE: Full English Breakfast 2008/02/04 15:27:33 (permalink)
I would also put a hold on the blood sausage. I was in Kankakee, IL at a German restaurant several yeras ago and I order the sausage platter which included blood sausage. I did not every know what they were and the first bite told me no way.

To this day it is no way.

Paul E. Smith
Knoxville, TN
#31
Twinwillow
Sirloin
  • Total Posts : 5044
  • Joined: 2006/04/15 23:17:00
  • Location: "Big D"
  • Status: offline
RE: Full English Breakfast 2008/02/04 15:38:28 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by Sundancer7

I would also put a hold on the blood sausage. I was in Kankakee, IL at a German restaurant several yeras ago and I order the sausage platter which included blood sausage. I did not every know what they were and the first bite told me no way.

To this day it is no way.

Paul E. Smith
Knoxville, TN


I think it's the texture that I object to so much. Gag!
#32
MissKitty
Cheeseburger
  • Total Posts : 292
  • Joined: 2003/10/24 14:55:00
  • Location: UK
  • Status: offline
RE: Full English Breakfast 2008/02/05 07:58:35 (permalink)
I like it, even as a former vegetarian ( although apparently you can get very good vegetarian versions now ) I couldn't eat it in massive quantities but I do love that earthy very iron rich taste. You do have to cook the slices until they are crispy on the outside, though.

By the way it really is called black pudding here, if you asked for blood pudding or blood sausage you would get some very puzzled looks.
#33
santacruz
Cheeseburger
  • Total Posts : 372
  • Joined: 2003/08/01 17:30:00
  • Location: Pescadero, CA
  • Status: offline
RE: Full English Breakfast 2008/02/06 15:01:23 (permalink)
There is only one thing I have to have at a Full English Breakfast and that is THE BLACK GOLD SPREAD CALLED --MARMITE--, it is so good spread over hot buttered toast. It mixes with all the other ingredients with a slight taste of Guinness Ah!
#34
Nancypalooza
Filet Mignon
  • Total Posts : 3778
  • Joined: 2004/06/17 14:39:00
  • Location: Columbia, SC
  • Status: offline
RE: Full English Breakfast 2008/02/07 13:36:50 (permalink)
Miss Kitty, when we were in the UK last year the full breakfast was always started with a cereal course; were we just being pigs and having both the cereal and the full breakfast, or is that the traditional starter?

It wasn't until the start of our third week there that we felt bold enough to just tell our b&b hosts what we wanted and didn't want on the full. It did give us a really nice sampling of what different folks did better or worse than others. The last two nights in Brecon at a little home-farm b&b--that lady could cook her fanny off.
#35
leethebard
Sirloin
  • Total Posts : 6186
  • Joined: 2007/08/16 17:35:00
  • Location: brick, NJ
  • Status: offline
RE: Full English Breakfast 2008/02/07 13:53:24 (permalink)
Ah yes,
There's something else great about English breakfasts:Marmalade...great REAL English marmalade on toast....and a great cup of English Breakfast Tea.....miss it
#36
MissKitty
Cheeseburger
  • Total Posts : 292
  • Joined: 2003/10/24 14:55:00
  • Location: UK
  • Status: offline
RE: Full English Breakfast 2008/02/07 14:12:20 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by Nancypalooza

Miss Kitty, when we were in the UK last year the full breakfast was always started with a cereal course; were we just being pigs and having both the cereal and the full breakfast, or is that the traditional starter?

It wasn't until the start of our third week there that we felt bold enough to just tell our b&b hosts what we wanted and didn't want on the full. It did give us a really nice sampling of what different folks did better or worse than others. The last two nights in Brecon at a little home-farm b&b--that lady could cook her fanny off.


Heh, no, you weren't being pigs - most hotels and B & B's will offer cereal and fruit and fruit juice as either a beginning or an adjunct to the meal. At home or eating it in cafes we usually don't bother but I think the sometimes overwhelming choice and quantity of food at breakfast in accomadation is out of a wish to provide good value for money and send you off on your days travels or touring with as much good food inside you as possible !

Most hotels/B & B's are very good about accomadating various needs for smaller amounts or different foods at breakfast time if you approach them politely in advance ( the night before, not months in advance, LOL !! ) The bigger hotels aren't too bothered about variations in catering but for the smaller ones its more problematical.

Incidentally, the best B & B breakfasts I have ever had were at a very small ( just two rooms in the family home ) but very high standard place in Winchester - I stayed there a few times and the breakfast was never less than exquisite. The husband used to make bread before he went off to work in the morning, and the wife made a real dream of a breakfast each day - as much produce locally sourced as possible, cereals, yoghurts, toast from the home made bread with a choice of 4 different preserves, fruit - always including a small bunch of flawless grapes with a pair of fruit scissors to cut the stems ! and gorgeous tea and coffee. They have moved to Devon now and I haven't yet stayed at their new place but do intend to - for anyone going to the West Country I would recommend them in a heart beat !
#37
GenB
Junior Burger
  • Total Posts : 18
  • Joined: 2008/03/29 17:26:00
  • Location: Oklahoma City, OK
  • Status: offline
RE: Full English Breakfast 2008/03/29 18:12:49 (permalink)
I stayed a while with a cousin in Dorset. She did the fried tomatoes, fried bread, bacon (streaky and regular), tea (with lots of fresh cream), and orange marmalade.
No beans, no mushrooms, no hashbrowns, and (mercifully) no blood pudding.
I think that the beans and mushrooms are more common in London, but the blood pudding seems to be common everywhere.
Kippers are a nice variation.
#38
Catracks
Cheeseburger
  • Total Posts : 196
  • Joined: 2003/06/24 18:07:00
  • Location: Southern, CA
  • Status: offline
RE: Full English Breakfast 2008/04/07 14:43:29 (permalink)
There is a lot of English food I like, but will never understand the love of beans straight out of the Van de Camps can or mushy peas.
#39
grynch
Hamburger
  • Total Posts : 59
  • Joined: 2007/08/14 08:12:00
  • Location: Ashland(not now), MA
  • Status: offline
RE: Full English Breakfast 2008/04/14 11:08:40 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by Nancypalooza

The last two nights in Brecon at a little home-farm b&b--that lady could cook her fanny off.




*L*.... misskitty... do you want to try to explain what that phrase would mean to a brit? *L*
#40
stevep
Hamburger
  • Total Posts : 58
  • Joined: 2006/08/01 21:50:00
  • Location: Worcester, MA
  • Status: offline
RE: Full English Breakfast 2008/04/30 23:38:31 (permalink)
I don't suppose anyone knows where to get a traditional Irish/English breakfast (complete with black and white pudding, yum) in central MA? Particularly Worcester? Apparently Irish Times and Funky Murphy's used to have one but not anymore.
#41
Nancypalooza
Filet Mignon
  • Total Posts : 3778
  • Joined: 2004/06/17 14:39:00
  • Location: Columbia, SC
  • Status: offline
RE: Full English Breakfast 2008/05/13 20:31:12 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by grynch

*L*.... misskitty... do you want to try to explain what that phrase would mean to a brit? *L*


I can probably guess. Not too far off, I would imagine, from the look I got from a British doctoral student in my program twenty years ago when I told him that the shag was the state dance of South Carolina.

I found some pix from our stay in Brecon I thought I'd share. This is the sign for the b&b:


And the hilarious thing about the breakfasts we had there was the family dog, Holly. She would just sort of skirt the perimeter when her mommy was around, but as soon as the lady left the room, she would hop right up into my partner's lap


for a cuddle


#42
macphile
Junior Burger
  • Total Posts : 20
  • Joined: 2008/06/24 01:28:00
  • Location: Houston, TX
  • Status: offline
RE: Full English Breakfast 2008/06/28 01:13:55 (permalink)
You know, with all the English breakfasts I've eaten at relatives' houses, B&Bs, etc., I've never seen blood pudding. Odd. I guess it depends on the region? And I'd forgotten about the beans, but I'm not a beans person, anyway.

I'm not sure about the "no sweet stuff," though. When I've had full English breakfasts, they've always come with marmalade and jam for the fried bread/toast. It's sitting out on the tables at B&Bs, like they do here.

And when the waitress asks what you want, you just say "full English," without the noun.

If I ate that stuff all the time here, I'd keel over from cholesterol poisoning. But when you spend the entire day hiking around Oxford or London or someplace, it's perfect. You're hungry at lunchtime after that, despite all that food in the morning.
#43
Page: < 12 Showing page 2 of 2
Jump to:
© 2014 APG vNext Commercial Version 5.1