Goodbye Roadfood... maybe...

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UncleVic
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2006/02/15 02:23:21 (permalink)

Goodbye Roadfood... maybe...

Has the economy destroyed the classic Roadfood Joints?

The last couple days, I’ve read reports from Adjudicator on the Varsity, and Ken Riddle on the Loveless Café. Not bad reports, but not good from a customers point of view. Seems quality has hit the pits. Makes me wonder if this is due to the economy or just someone trying to make a little more in the end..

The Sterns have done great reports on these establishments in the past… So it makes me wonder, why has something that was so good gone bad?

Maybe your thoughts will persuade other small business owners on some details to look after. (You don’t need to be a Professional to respond to this one)..

Thus, the question being posed here is why have the classics gone bad, and what can be done to make them better?
#1

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    tacchino
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    RE: Goodbye Roadfood... maybe... 2006/02/15 02:37:38 (permalink)
    I've wondered about this too, pondering the thread about Olive Garden, ironically. I have always thought that the success of these chains is due in a large way to our increasingly "risk averse" attitude when we dine out. The Applebee's, Olive Garden's, Cracker Barrel's, etc., are known entities, so there is little risk, as there might be with the random roadside establishment. Regardless of what people may think about quality, many flock to these places for security. However, this does seem paradoxical, when we consider the fact that we are becoming more adventurous as a whole in terms of trying different cuisines and foods in this country. For example, Thai, Vietnamese, Korean and other ethnic cuisines are no longer rarities reserved to immigrant enclaves in major cities on either coast...and Chinese food is no longer defined solely by chop suey and general tsao's chicken in this country.

    I guess the pressure may be on these "classic" places to homogenize their offerings, to cut back on costs, and to appeal to the crowds who want a standardized commodity (or a "sure thing") when they dine out.
    #2
    BT
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    RE: Goodbye Roadfood... maybe... 2006/02/15 03:55:43 (permalink)
    I think tacchino largely nailed it. A lot of people don't want to take a chance--on getting bad food or getting sick or whatever stupid fears go through their heads and they know what they'll get if they go to a chain.

    I also think after years of chain dominance, a lot of people's standards for quality in restaurant food have been driven down to the level of mediocrity. I have come to this conclusion because I come from a city where chain food--other than fast food (McD's, BK and the like)--is practically unknown. I think there's one Olive Garden in San Francisco--in the only suburban-style mall in town out near the city line--but it's a long drive from where I live and I've never been there. There are also several chains like Bobby Rubino's House of Ribs near Fisherman's Wharf where they serve mainly tourists from out of town, but there are none in most SF neighborhoods. NONE. So when I go visit my family in Florida, they drag me to places I've never been like Panera Bread, TGI Friday's, Red Lobster. I find the food in all these places bland and pretty tasteless (but not being xxx, I don't tell them how offensive and nasty their restaurant choices are and, being not a local, I really can't make a better suggestion). But what surprises me is everybody else in the group usually LIKES the food in these places. I long ago concluded it's because they don't know any better. They don't know what good resturant food tastes like any more.

    On the other hand, I think the proliferation of ethnic food is wonderful. Again, I live in a place that can have restaurants from 6 different Asian countries on one block. When I go out to eat, it's almost always to a family-run ethnic place. In a way, I think that's because Asian food has become the regional cuisine of the Bay Area (SF has a majority Asian population--over 50%) and if I lived in the Southeast I'd go out for BBQ and seafood (I sure do when I'm there) which I also love but which are not done to my taste in my area.

    To try to answer your question, I think there's 2 factors at work. The first is the natural tendency of most restaurants to slide in quality over time, especially as/when the founder retires or passes the business to someone else, even if it's family. The second is that not many native-born Americans seem interested in going into the restaurant business serving "regular" American food at the lower and mid-range price level. There's plenty of cooking school trained chefs wanting their own high-end places, but not many people wanting to open a new place serving really good meatloaf and country-fried steak. I think that's because it's really hard to make money doing that. Again, in SF there are a few places that have tried--places like Chow where I think some of you may have eaten--but the economics are such that those places have to charge a bit more than most people expect to pay for this type of food so they have to be in a place where lots of people eat out and can afford meals that are a bit pricey by national standards (like SF which has many well-paid singles who eat most meals out).

    Chow:


    So, we are losing the older places as the natural way of things, but most of the new places coming along are ethnic, not "regular American" roadfood. In truth, I don't mind. I make a decent meatloaf at home but I haven't mastered Tom Kha Gai or Chicken Vindaloo yet so I as soon go out for those and eat the meatloaf at home.
    #3
    enginecapt
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    RE: Goodbye Roadfood... maybe... 2006/02/15 04:49:49 (permalink)
    I'm with Bernard. My area is full of places that qualify for traditional Roadfood in every way but the menu. They're all located within minutes of a major Interstate (I-10 or 15) or highway (Rt 66), they're locally owned, they offer inside seating and wait service, and they serve up good food in healthy portions for a fair price. I'm in the process of plowing my way through as many of them as I can since moving here (11 so far) and have yet to see meat loaf or chicken fried steak on the menu, save for one which is a 50's themed breakfast and lunch house, and it was horrible.

    Bring on the ethnic roadfood joints.
    #4
    RubyRose
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    RE: Goodbye Roadfood... maybe... 2006/02/15 06:24:53 (permalink)
    One factor that hardly ever gets mentioned here is health-consciousness. While the statistical results might not prove that Americans are eating healthier, many at least pay lip service to making an attempt to watch their cholesterol and calorie intakes. Now that the Atkins diet fad is on the wane, a big hunk of red meat with potatoes and/or gravy could be an unattractive choice for a whole chunk of consumers.

    The chains have recognized this, as evidenced by a selection of "heart healthy" choices of bland, mediocre food on their menus. And many of the ethnic foods are more compatible with today's recommended dietary guidelines of more vegetables, etc.

    For every hot dog vendor whose lunctime sales are dropping, there's probably an increase in the ubiquitous grilled chicken caesar salads sales somewhere else.

    Just another way to look at it.



    #5
    V960
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    RE: Goodbye Roadfood... maybe... 2006/02/15 08:46:59 (permalink)
    In piedmont NC it seems to be alive and well.
    #6
    dogmeat
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    RE: Goodbye Roadfood... maybe... 2006/02/15 09:36:58 (permalink)
    Eleven years ago I found myself in the restaurant business with no formal training,some catering experience, and a lifetime of eating and cooking all over the world, but not professionally. The opportunity (?) presented itself because of a slide in quality from some new owners.

    LP gas was .66 compared to $1.72 today, quality ground beef was .88 compared to $2.08 today and so on. Insurance in Florida is a major expense after the terrible storms we have experienced and liquor liability is going to be a problem in the future if you don't serve food.

    The health issue is a great point, especially if, by definition, a Roadfood Joint is frequented by daily regulars also. In our particular case we find that most people eat out to have the types of food that maybe they do not fix at home. Based on our available talent, we offer many different ethnic styles of food that are mixed into the menu and allow us to offer "Roadfood", of which we are proud of.

    The memories from my childhood and Roadfood restaurants always had a central character or family who was involved with the operation and indeed these people,in most cases, have left the building.

    #7
    BT
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    RE: Goodbye Roadfood... maybe... 2006/02/15 12:39:07 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by V960

    In piedmont NC it seems to be alive and well.


    It may be that in the South (and parts of the Midwest) in general it's more alive and well than elsewhere because what we all think of as "roadfood" is really Southeast and Midwest regional food.
    #8
    garryd451
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    RE: Goodbye Roadfood... maybe... 2006/02/15 12:55:21 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by RubyRose

    One factor that hardly ever gets mentioned here is health-consciousness. While the statistical results might not prove that Americans are eating healthier, many at least pay lip service to making an attempt to watch their cholesterol and calorie intakes. Now that the Atkins diet fad is on the wane, a big hunk of red meat with potatoes and/or gravy could be an unattractive choice for a whole chunk of consumers.

    The chains have recognized this, as evidenced by a selection of "heart healthy" choices of bland, mediocre food on their menus. And many of the ethnic foods are more compatible with today's recommended dietary guidelines of more vegetables, etc.

    For every hot dog vendor whose lunctime sales are dropping, there's probably an increase in the ubiquitous grilled chicken caesar salads sales somewhere else.

    Just another way to look at it.






    I really don't think Americans (in genral) are eating that healthy. Maybe it just my way of thinking but I feel eating Heathly isn't a big concern for many Americans. I am going to list a few things that keep going through my mind when I think about Americans eating healthy.

    1. The fast food industry just keeps growing, you have fast foods like MacDonald's. Pizza Hut, Taco Bell and etc in town and villages with less than 5,000 people. Twenty Years ago, No one every thought these big chain could get enough customers in a small town or village to make it profitable, but they are, all over the country!
    2. The Huge majority of the food sold at fast foods places is NOT the healthy type food.
    3. Americans are eating more junk food than ever! The Next time You are at the store, count how may rows are taken up by Candy, Ice Cream, Pies, Donuts, Potato Chips, Corn Chips,Soda Pop, etc and etc.
    4. AAlso alot of people that say they are eating Healthy are eating things they think are Healthy because the advertising says it is wholesome or old fashion but the food is not healthy. Look at the fat sodium in alot of bars, snack foods, and junk food that says wholesome or old fashion. Alot of American have wholesome and old fashion mixed up, they think it means healthy.
    #9
    txtwister
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    RE: Goodbye Roadfood... maybe... 2006/02/15 13:18:31 (permalink)
    quote:
    It may be that in the South (and parts of the Midwest) in general it's more alive and well than elsewhere because what we all think of as "roadfood" is really Southeast and Midwest regional food.


    I was thinking that as well, BT. I also think the "risk averse" idea ties into the economy in more ways than one. There's a locally owned restaurant here that "sometimes" serves a really good steak or chicken-fried steak and killer homemade rolls. Sometimes everything seems rewarmed or is cooked incorrectly (rare means blood on the plate, folks!). And either way you're sitting on uncomfortable metal/vinyl chairs if you were smart enough to avoid the bottomless pit booths which put you roughly at eye-level with your plate. Oh, and you're drinking tea, because they don't have a liquor license. Granted, it has "character" and if you catch them on a good night, it's worth it.

    Or, there's a chain steakhouse that always serves a great meal, prepared exactly how it was ordered, with a full bar if I'm in the mood for a margarita or a glass of wine. And, it costs less - even with drinks.

    We don't go out all that often anymore because we're watching money, so when we do go out, I want a good meal, guaranteed - not a roll of the dice. When things are better for us financially, we're more likely to take "risks" - but right now, that's not how it goes.
    #10
    tmiles
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    RE: Goodbye Roadfood... maybe... 2006/02/15 13:36:56 (permalink)
    Especially since I started posting here, I have been stopping at little RF places, in the hopes of finding a new gem. As tacchino and BT have mentioned, I usually find a place that is not as good as the typical chain. To plug the book, and this site, I have never been unhappy with a place listed as good on Roadfood.com or in the book.
    #11
    Michael Hoffman
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    RE: Goodbye Roadfood... maybe... 2006/02/15 13:44:50 (permalink)
    I can't help wondering, BT, what your reason for the gratuitous insult launched in my direction is about. I'm sure that you will be able to provide some reason for saying, "I find the food in all these places bland and pretty tasteless (but not being Michael Hoffman, I don't tell them how offensive and nasty their restaurant choices are and, being not a local, I really can't make a better suggestion)." What I expect is for you to post something I've ever said that would show I have told anyone who has taken me anywhere to eat that their restaurant choices are offensive and nasty. Failing that I'm sure you will offer an apology.
    #12
    mayor al
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    RE: Goodbye Roadfood... maybe... 2006/02/15 13:53:09 (permalink)

    Another contributing factor to the demise of the individual "roadfood" type of business, be it restaurant or grocery,
    Americans as a group are becoming much more 'time-aware'. How far isn't measured in miles (or meters). It is more and more being measured in "elapsed time to get there". The Scenic Byways and Blue Highways are relegated to those crammed times of year known as Vacation Time. Otherwise, it is the shortest and fastest route to wherever we are going that is the choice of the traveler.

    We want the food to be located next to a fuel stop...Just off the end of an on/off ramp back to the Racetrack/Interstate. Who can afford the land at those prime development locations? The Corporate Chain Operation. Then add the Drive-thru that now is much more than a burger-joint business window and you get a feel for the direction that the whole business is taking.

    Same goes for the purchase of unprepared(?) food. The day of going from Butcher to Baker to Candlestick Maker() is all but done except for some few Americans. The majority (and this is expanding) look for the "One-Stop" shopping to fill their needs as quickly and effortlessly as possible. That has been the reason that the SuperCenter and SuperK and other such large chain operations have grown so quickly. If Americans can go to WalMart, get food, a haircut, dry-cleaning and photoprinting, Pharmcey needs and the oil changed in their cars in ONE Stop between dropping off and picking up the kids from Soccer practice...think of the time they will save !

    We have just begun to peek into this whole concept of what things will be like in this area in the future. Some places say "call ahead" and they will run the meals out to your car when you arrive (expanded drive-up concept). How about the grocery chain that allows you to walk virtual aisles in the store using your home (or Office) computer, and have your cursor click on items just like grabbing them off the shelf and putting them in your cart. Many businesss are doing this already (Amazon.Com for one), but the grocery area is just getting started. After selecting, you pay on-line and then drive by and they load your 'stuff' into your car from a drive-thru window type of arrangement. No more time-consummingparking/walking thru the store/ and standing in line to check out.
    Have any of you SoCal Roadfooders used your FAST-TRAC Transponders to pay for fast-food at the foodstands that are now equipped to charge your account for the burgers you will eat while you drive on the Orange-County Toll Roads?

    How many of you have ever sent an "E-card" in place of going to a store, selecting and buying a birthday card, and mailing it in the Postal Mail? This sort of purchase is another element in the 'save time' realm.
    This post isn't meant to create controversy. It is a 'guesstimate" of one of the factors contributing to the changes we see coming.
    #13
    pcdiva
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    RE: Goodbye Roadfood... maybe... 2006/02/15 15:02:06 (permalink)
    Why can't ethnic restaurants be roadfood? I see lots of Italian places mentioned in different threads and just post-WW II they would have been as foreign to most people outside of the big cities in the North as Oriental and Latin places more recently. I feel if a locally owned restaurant has good food at reasonable prices it can be roadfood for me.

    $0.02 from Ann Arbor
    #14
    EdSails
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    RE: Goodbye Roadfood... maybe... 2006/02/15 15:10:55 (permalink)
    Mr. Mayor,
    I have been to Baker-----but should I also go to Butcher and Candlestick Maker too? How far away are they? Any good meat and 3's places in Butcher?

    #15
    Cribbage Fiend
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    RE: Goodbye Roadfood... maybe... 2006/02/15 15:48:05 (permalink)
    PC Diva, I think that ethnic foods are leaking into roadfood here. I also think that there is a tendency to define raodfood as a place that has history as well as good food, and many of the ethnic eateries haven't been there for as long. I also think that roadfood defines the food as a reflection of the community, so an ethnic food becomes roadfood once that ethnic group has been there enough to establish themselves within the community. Someine mentioned earlier in this thread that they think the variety of Asian flavors are definitely roadfood in SF. As for me, I say bring all those flavors on.
    #16
    mayor al
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    RE: Goodbye Roadfood... maybe... 2006/02/15 15:59:20 (permalink)
    Ed,
    If you have been to Baker, You've seen it all.

    We should re-christen you "Bun-Boy" !!

    As to Butcher, and Candlestick Maker... There is a Butchertown community in Louisville's East end, where the meat processors used to be located (and some still are). Come on over and visit.
    #17
    zataar
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    RE: Goodbye Roadfood... maybe... 2006/02/15 18:23:43 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by pcdiva

    Why can't ethnic restaurants be roadfood? I see lots of Italian places mentioned in different threads and just post-WW II they would have been as foreign to most people outside of the big cities in the North as Oriental and Latin places more recently. I feel if a locally owned restaurant has good food at reasonable prices it can be roadfood for me.

    $0.02 from Ann Arbor


    Some people consider ethnic food to be less "Roadfood Worthy" because it isn't regionally based. The perception that Vietnamese food tastes the same in California as it does in Iowa, for instance. I do think that was somewhat valid, but that is also changing. Just as Italian food in Boston is quite different than Italian food in St. Louis, I'm starting to notice regional differences in some of the newer (meaning less than 40 years of accessability) ethnic foods. Vietnamese and Thai food is different in Minneapolis than it is in Kansas City. More regional ingredients are being incorporated into those various cuisines.That's certainly how Italian American cuisine has evolved. I'm one of those people who do feel that ethnic food is going to be a big part of roadfood. Bring it on! I don't want what is tradionally thought of as Regional American food to disappear before I get to try more of it. I've been fortunate to experience what I have, but I still haven't made it to the Northwest and the Northeast, like Rhode Island and Maine. I don't want to miss lobster rolls at the source.
    #18
    Sandy Thruthegarden
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    RE: Goodbye Roadfood... maybe... 2006/02/15 18:46:40 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by Al-The Mayor-Bowen

    Ed,
    If you have been to Baker, You've seen it all.

    We should re-christen you "Bun-Boy" !!

    As to Butcher, and Candlestick Maker... There is a Butchertown community in Louisville's East end, where the meat processors used to be located (and some still are). Come on over and visit.


    And there's a Bun Boy Restaurant right up the road from you in Warsaw, Kentucky, Your Honor.
    #19
    wanderingjew
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    RE: Goodbye Roadfood... maybe... 2006/02/15 19:00:38 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by garryd451

    quote:
    Originally posted by RubyRose



    I really don't think Americans (in genral) are eating that healthy. Maybe it just my way of thinking but I feel eating Heathly isn't a big concern for many Americans. I am going to list a few things that keep going through my mind when I think about Americans eating healthy.


    You're probably right, in Michigan they probably aren't eating healthy, however in other parts of the country, many people especially under the age of 50 are eating very healthy. In fact for every kosher deli in the NYC that goes under, a sushi restaurant is going up in it's place
    #20
    BT
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    RE: Goodbye Roadfood... maybe... 2006/02/15 19:05:44 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by pcdiva

    Why can't ethnic restaurants be roadfood? I see lots of Italian places mentioned in different threads and just post-WW II they would have been as foreign to most people outside of the big cities in the North as Oriental and Latin places more recently. I feel if a locally owned restaurant has good food at reasonable prices it can be roadfood for me.

    $0.02 from Ann Arbor


    They can be. As I tried to say, for me they ARE. But the question that started the thread referenced "classic" places--or, put another way, places that serve American "classic" food--which seem to be getting replaced by ethnic food, the question being, "Why?".
    #21
    wanderingjew
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    RE: Goodbye Roadfood... maybe... 2006/02/15 19:07:19 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by pcdiva

    Why can't ethnic restaurants be roadfood? I see lots of Italian places mentioned in different threads and just post-WW II they would have been as foreign to most people outside of the big cities in the North as Oriental and Latin places more recently. I feel if a locally owned restaurant has good food at reasonable prices it can be roadfood for me.
    $0.02 from Ann Arbor


    This has been addressed before on a few other threads. Here is one of them.
    www.roadfood.com/Forums/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=3130&SearchTerms=ethnic,food,roadfood
    #22
    BT
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    RE: Goodbye Roadfood... maybe... 2006/02/15 19:13:46 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by zataar


    Some people consider ethnic food to be less "Roadfood Worthy" because it isn't regionally based. The perception that Vietnamese food tastes the same in California as it does in Iowa, for instance. I do think that was somewhat valid, but that is also changing. Just as Italian food in Boston is quite different than Italian food in St. Louis, I'm starting to notice regional differences in some of the newer (meaning less than 40 years of accessability) ethnic foods. Vietnamese and Thai food is different in Minneapolis than it is in Kansas City. More regional ingredients are being incorporated into those various cuisines.


    That perception has always been wrong. I proved that to myself a couple decades ago when the Navy sent me to Vancouver for the first time. I had heard that Vancouver has a large and thriving Chinese population so I was looking forward to some good eating. I was disappointed because it turned out most of the genuinely large and thriving Chinese population there are from Hong Kong and environs, i.e Canton and they serve/eat Cantonese food while what I like and am used to from San Francisco is Schechuan and Hunan food. Similarly, I've always been sort of disappointed with the Italian food in the Bay Area and I've read that may be because the large population of Italian immigrants there came from the part of Italy surrounding Bologna, not the southern Naples/Calabria/Sicily area that populated most Eastern cities and produced the sort of Italian food I grew up with.
    #23
    mayor al
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    RE: Goodbye Roadfood... maybe... 2006/02/15 19:38:22 (permalink)

    Sandy,
    Ed's Bun Boy that is the one located in Baker,CA on I-15 about halfway between Barstow,CA and Las Vegas,NV Baker consists of several gas stations and a couple of convenience stores and the BUN BOY Burger Place. Two things to know about Baker,CA. 1. It isn't at the end of the Earth (but you can see over the edge from there)! and it is the home (right next to the Bun Boy) of the World's Tallest Thermometer, easily read from the passing Interstate Highway. Funny thing about that, when they constructed the Thermometer they rigged the guide wire/cables incorrectly so that the first desert wind to come along after the installation blew the whole thing (some 120 ft worth of electronic sensors and tower) over like a dandelion puff!! It is back, and constructed a bit more solidly. Bun Boy is a legend in the desert! And to put it mildly, it isn't near as interesting as it sounds!
    #24
    Adjudicator
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    RE: Goodbye Roadfood... maybe... 2006/02/15 20:09:33 (permalink)
    In addition to visiting The Varsity on my last trip, I also ate ate two other places, one of which is awaiting pics in order to publish. The other one was a great hamburger and beer/booze joint that I have mentioned in some of my earlier posts. This particular place is definitely NOT Road Food, but worthy of review, someday. Maybe sooner if we have some bikers here in our audience. ULVER knows of which I speak. On the other hand, I have identified in route to the place I speak of what appears to be a quaint little Cuban restaurant named "Papa's Place" right off of Ponce De Leon (just past Juniper St.) as you head towards the Decatur & L5P area(s). I will make this a stopping point on my next visit (reminding myself NOW to have camera in hand, etc.). If any of the metro 'Lanta folks have visited this Cuban restaurant before, please advise me if worthwhile.


    #25
    enginecapt
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    RE: Goodbye Roadfood... maybe... 2006/02/16 03:34:14 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by Al-The Mayor-Bowen

    Have any of you SoCal Roadfooders used your FAST-TRAC Transponders to pay for fast-food at the foodstands that are now equipped to charge your account for the burgers you will eat while you drive on the Orange-County Toll Roads?


    I have the transponder for the OC toll roads, but have never heard of using it to pay for fast food. Maybe it's because the only burger fast food I allow myself comes from you-know-where or In and Out.
    #26
    drsmoke02
    Cheeseburger
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    • Joined: 2005/11/16 13:43:00
    • Location: emmitsburg, MD
    • Status: offline
    RE: Goodbye Roadfood... maybe... 2006/02/16 14:40:10 (permalink)
    there is the ultimate roadfood restaurant in my hometown, emmitsburg maryland.its a bbq, but serves alot of other eats.absolutely everything they serve is about as good as it gets.the owner is not motivated by money,he knows that money follows consistently great food.he has books he keeps of customers comments,there are thousands and they all rave about everything from the chili,soups,burgers,pulled pork,briskit,ribs,chicken,smoked meatloaf,sides,salads, and much more. i know i'm the owner, and i refuse to believe anyone anywhere does it better.my ego is served with every order and nothing could be more important to me. i challenge anyone to tell me about a better allaround restaurant.
    #27
    EdSails
    Filet Mignon
    • Total Posts : 4138
    • Joined: 2003/05/09 18:39:00
    • Location: Mission Viejo, CA
    • Status: offline
    RE: Goodbye Roadfood... maybe... 2006/02/16 20:16:07 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by Al-The Mayor-Bowen

    Ed,
    If you have been to Baker, You've seen it all.

    We should re-christen you "Bun-Boy" !!

    As to Butcher, and Candlestick Maker... There is a Butchertown community in Louisville's East end, where the meat processors used to be located (and some still are). Come on over and visit.

    I've been to Bun Boy, and I was at the mechanic in Baker to get a water pump replaced. I definitely saw it all!
    #28
    mayor al
    Fire Safety Admin
    • Total Posts : 15335
    • Joined: 2002/08/20 22:32:00
    • Location: Louisville area, Southern Indiana
    • Status: offline
    RE: Goodbye Roadfood... maybe... 2006/02/16 20:53:37 (permalink)
    Posts deleted that didn't meet the courtesy rules. AL
    #29
    ellen4641
    Filet Mignon
    • Total Posts : 3531
    • Joined: 2004/05/01 01:44:00
    • Location: Egg Harbor Township, NJ
    • Status: offline
    RE: Goodbye Roadfood... maybe... 2006/02/16 22:36:26 (permalink)
    such excellent posts, you guys.....

    very much reflects the changing demographics of ROADFOOD

    I wish there were more burger and hot dog joints still around, but the sad reality is that there are'nt..

    southern california still has a big assortment of 50's and 60's burger joints ,etc... (places like Steve's Burgers, why not burgers (yes, it really exists, in torrance), dinos , etc, etc, etc...
    but almost all of them also whip up decent tacos these days as well........
    most of them even have decent huevos rancheros for breakfast , too...

    and some good hot dog joints like Pinks and Carneys, etc...

    #30
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