Great Dogs / Wieners of Georgia and the Southeast

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Ted52
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2004/07/07 11:20:22 (permalink)

Great Dogs / Wieners of Georgia and the Southeast

As a transplant from the northeast who is now in Georgia, my regret while reading most of these topics is the predominance of NY, NJ, Chicago and other northern locales for most of the information. What about more focus on top dogs accessible to those of us in Georgia, the Carolinas, Bama, and other surrounding states of the southeast?
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    Ted52
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    RE: Great Dogs / Wieners of Georgia and the Southeast 2004/07/07 11:21:53 (permalink)
    Article on 3 Georgia Hot Dog classics with appropriate credit to the Atlanta Journal and Constitution and Cox News Service:

    Frankly, you can't beat these Georgia hot dog joints
    By WILLLIAM SCHEMMEL
    FOR COX NEWS SERVICE


    You're driving through Georgia on a brisk autumn day. It's lunchtime. Hunger sparks a nostalgic memory of the old corner diner, where the hot dogs were draped with top-secret chili, coleslaw or special sauce. It's a siren song to your palate, and suddenly you need to answer the call.

    If you're driving near Macon, Columbus or Cartersville, you're in luck. You can.


    Nu-Way Weiners

    Now the rest of us know Macon's secret: Nu-Way Weiners aren't merely "The Best in Town" — their motto — they're among the elite from east to west. Gourmet magazine ranked Nu-Way No. 5 among the nation's Top 10 wiener palaces. Southern Living has sung its praises. Even Money magazine listed it among "America's Top Dogs," and PBS featured the 11-link Macon chain in a documentary about this all-American treat.

    The dictionary spells it "wiener," but Nu-Way has spelled it "weiner" and made them Macon's way since 1916, when Greek immigrant James Mallis opened his shoebox-shaped storefront at 430 Cotton Ave. and addicted Maconites to his franks in a steamed bun, with mustard, onions, secret-recipe chili and medium-wattage barbecue sauce.

    Three generations later, partners and cousins Spyros Dermatas and Jim Cacavias are preparing their private-label pork-and-beef "weiners" the tried-and-true way in the original 39-seat diner, which has changed only marginally through the years, and 10 other locations in Macon, Warner Robins and Fort Valley.

    The original Nu-Way is at 430 Cotton Ave. at Cherry Street in downtown Macon. 478-743-1366.

    Lieutenant's Scrambled Dog

    Lieutenant Stevens serves hundreds of tasty, messy Scrambled Dogs six days a week at Dinglewood Pharmacy in Columbus. A hot dog and bun are split and splayed in a banana split dish and piled with dill pickles, mustard and cheese. Then the tour de force — a meaty, beany, rich, red flood of Lieutenant's special chili — fills the dish and drips over the sides. On top of that goes a shower of oyster crackers. With plenty of napkins and a spoon (to scoop up the tangy chili), you're ready to dig in.

    Lieutenant — that's the first name on his birth certificate — was born on Nov. 12, 1931, the day after Armistice Day (now Veterans Day). "They decided to name me in honor of the military," Stevens says of his parents. When he was 14, he went to work for Henry "Sport" Brown, the Scrambled Dog's creator. When Brown died in the 1950s, Stevens took over, tweaked the recipe and has been satisfying Columbus' craving ever since.

    Patrons who were children when they tasted their first Scrambled Dogs come back to introduce them to their children and grandchildren. Mondays through Saturdays, patrons fill and refill the dozen counter stools, five tables and five booths.

    "Lots of folks ask for my chili recipe," Stevens says with a smile, "but it's a home recipe and I don't give it. They have to come here to enjoy it."

    • Dinglewood Pharmacy is at 1939 Wynnton Road, Columbus. 706-322-0616. From Atlanta, take I-85 to I-185 Exit 6 / Macon Road and go west. Macon Road becomes Wynnton Road, and Dinglewood is on the right, five minutes from the interstate. Scrambled Dogs are dished up 11 a.m.-6:30 p.m. Mondays-Fridays and 11 a.m.-4.30 p.m. Saturdays. "Unscrambled" dogs (a regular hot dog) and chili by the bowl are also served. Mayfield ice cream and milkshakes make cooling palate-cleansers.

    4-Way Lunch

    If your neighborhood diner burned to cinders, would you pitch in to put your favorite comfort food back on the counter? You'd probably dig deep if the diner was as beloved as 4-Way Lunch in Cartersville.

    On June 23, 1993, an after-midnight fire devastated the 62-year-old downtown landmark. Then came the really bad news: Owner Ernest Garrison, whose father opened the place in 1931, lacked insurance to rebuild.

    Aghast at the prospect of never again hearing the counter crew's friendly chat as it serves plates of hot dogs, hamburgers and french fries sloppy with onion gravy or chili, the 4-Way's friends came to the rescue. Electricians and carpenters worked for free, and donations poured in from as far away as the Carolinas and the Midwest. Two months after the fire, 4-Way Lunch reopened and it was business as usual.

    Lawyers, ditch-diggers, cops, clerks, City Hall and courthouse minions and even tourists keep the 4-Way's 11 stools occupied from 5:30 a.m., when the doors open, to 3 p.m., when they close.

    The onion gravy and chili are still tangy, the experience still a bargain. A loaded hot dog or hamburger is $1.50, a pile of fries $1. If you've been in a few times, they put in your "usual" as soon as you show your face.

    It's very friendly, but the sign behind the counter advises: "This isn't Burger King. You don't get it your way. You get it our way, or you don't get the damn thing."

    4-Way Lunch is at Main and Gilmer streets in downtown Cartersville, 50 miles north of downtown Atlanta. No phone. Open 5:30 a.m.-3 p.m. Mondays-Saturdays. From I-75, take Exit 288 / Cartersville Main Street and drive 5 minutes. The bright red 4-Way Lunch building is on the left as you come into town.
    #2
    Ted52
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    RE: Great Dogs / Wieners of Georgia and the Southeast 2004/07/07 11:57:26 (permalink)
    If you travel I-77 near Charlotte, NC there is a first class hot dog joint, just a few years old, called Matt's Chicago Dog. The original location is in Cornelius, NC within 10 miles north of Charlotte, right off I-77. It was founded by Chicago natives, with all-Chicago branded ingredients including Vienna Beef products. It is clean, relatively spacious for this type of restaurant, with a first-rate menu that includes dogs, Chicago beef sandwiches, italian sausauges, brats, polish sausages, great burgers, deli sandwiches, and even chicken fingers and wings. Great execution, with emphasis on the dogs and the Chicago beef. A "must visit" if you are in the area.
    **************

    A short 2003 article below from the Charlotte Business Journal confirms their success:

    Matt's Chicago Dog is beefing up its local presence
    Ashley M. Gibson
    Matt Sielsky hopes to hit it big in the gourmet frank business with his second Matt's Chicago Dog location opening at 435 S. Tryon St. next month.


    The Chicago native has taken a choice location in Childress Klein's mixed-use development The Green directly underneath Stephan Latorre's new restaurant Aquavina.

    Renovation of the 2,000-square-foot space, which is expected to cost about $300,000, is under way.

    Sielsky expects the seven-employee uptown restaurant's sales to hit $500,000 in the first full year of operation, then grow by 20% annually.

    His first Matt's Chicago Dog opened last May in Cornelius, off Interstate 77 at Exit 28. "Our goal is to have four or five stores in our family," he says. "We are also looking at a franchise program that could move us into South Carolina, Georgia, Virginia and D.C. over the next five years."

    Sielsky touts the authentic nature of his fare: the dogs are Vienna Beef imported from Chicago served on traditional steamed poppy seed buns.

    "We are using premium products," he says. "Our corned beef and pastrami are first cuts and all of our chicken is fresh. We want to serve the things that make people enjoy the meal and make them want to come back."

    With a tentative opening date of Aug. 10, the new uptown location will offer a unique feature for busy patrons -- online ordering. A customer can log on to the restaurant's Web site, place an order and have it delivered or ready for pick-up at a specified time. "It's a hell of a lot of work," says Sielsky of the restaurant business. "But I have been pleasantly surprised by its success."

    Matt's Chicago Dog
    19732 One Norman Place
    Suite 330
    Cornelius, NC 28031
    704-892-5005 (phone)


    #3
    Ted52
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    RE: Great Dogs / Wieners of Georgia and the Southeast 2004/08/19 20:30:51 (permalink)
    Excellent, small Chicago Dog joint in Atlanta, serving Vienna beef products. The review below is by Tom Maicon, an Atlanta dining critic, and appeared at AtlantaCuisine.com

    Where Tom Recently Ate

    Da Chicago Dog
    Memory Evoking Dogs... and Buns
    5/6/04


    Have you ever taken a bite into a piece of food and suddenly found yourself deeply drifting in ‘memoryland’ to a place and time long ago?

    This is precisely what happened to me during my first visit to Da Chicago Dog on Piedmont. It so happens, as I sunk my teeth through the juicy tomato wedge and into the crisp pickle, then POPPED my way into the pleasantly resistant natural casing savoring the non-sweet Chicago style neon green relish and, of course, the much anticipated celery salt finish... I found myself two decades back in time.


    Da Chicago Dog
    Yes, one bite evoked memories from nearly twenty years ago, to a time in which I was an immature, and to be honest with you, a very outta control teen. My mind drifted from my seat at the worn storefront digs of the Da Chicago Dog to a hot summer day on a private bank of the Chattahoochee River, mind you; this was back in a time the ‘hooch’ was still considered safe for recreational purposes.

    And recreate along its banks we youngsters did. We swung from ropes that plunged us into its cool running waters, barely dressed hotties stretched out on rocks basking their already golden brown skin under the intense Georgia sun and, of course, beer, plenty of ice cold suds to go around.

    Every once in a while, one of my beer buddies, a Chicago native, pulled a cherished bag of true Chicago style hot dogs from his crucial backup beer stash cooler. I distinctly remember those unusually fantastic dogs – they SNAPPED when your teeth penetrated their thick natural casings. The Chicago style neon green relish he brought along was alive and fresh, a far cry from the horribly sweet dull version of junk relish that is commonly found here in the south.

    These induced memories were vivid, in fact; so vivid I even began to catch whiffs of coconut suntan oil and blazing reefer. So taken in, I could feel the chilly waters of the ‘hooch’ and taste the ice-cold beer as it rushed down the back of my dry throat.

    Hot dogs at Da Chicago Dog
    The dogs at the Da Chicago Dog are boiled and the buns steamed. They're topped with ripe full tomato wedge slices, crisp pickle quarters, onions, hot peppers, and spicy mustard. These dogs have the clear advantage being that they’re prepared in a controlled environment.

    Hot dogs two decades ago on he ‘hooch’
    Out in our ‘outta control’ environment – we charred the poor wieners over an open flame, usually, on a stick. We weren't equiped with onions, tomatoes, pickles, hot peppers or spicy mustard. Just a flame, some true Chicago style dogs and nuclear green relish.

    Now those firm buns basking out on the rocks... they'll be pretty tough to top.


    Price Range: Hot dogs: $1.99 - $2.89 (add a buck for the 1/4 pounder)

    Key Notes:
    The natural casings make this place truly special
    They will chargrill your dog if you really want to take stroll down memory lane
    Boy, do I miss the view of those buns at the 'hooch'

    1877 Piedmont Rd, Tel: 404-815-8135
    #4
    David_NYC
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    RE: Great Dogs / Wieners of Georgia and the Southeast 2004/08/19 21:44:01 (permalink)
    From time to time, I travel on business to Georgia and Alabama. I generally eat the fried chicken or other "Southern home cooking" cuisine down there, for I haven't found any region of the country that does it better. However, I never found any Dogs or Wieners that jumped out of me. Of course, this is not the kind of cuisine that is featured in the expense account joints my corporate travel department lines up for me.

    It really takes locals such as yourself to document the places that serve truly outstanding dogs and wieners.

    While I don't know where the factories or restaurants are that sell these, they must be out there. I say this because once you push into Louisiana, there are loads of small firms making great boudin sausage. One great place is a tiny on-premise provision company/full line grocery called the "Best Stop Supermarket" in Scott, LA. Now, we all know there are companies like Bryan down there manufacturing "Frankfurters". What is personally don't know are the names of firms making quality provisions.

    -David
    #5
    Ort. Carlton.
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    RE: Great Dogs / Wieners of Georgia and the Southeast 2004/08/20 00:03:27 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by Ted52



    Ted,
    Thanks a million for mentioning that article! I'll post more when the library reopens tomorrow. They're about to kick me out.
    Rapidly, Ort. in Athens, Georgia.
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    FOX1
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    RE: Great Dogs / Wieners of Georgia and the Southeast 2004/08/20 02:00:41 (permalink)
    Great Hot Dog brand in VA. and N.C. is Jesse Jones. Thier chili is not bad either
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    Hillbilly
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    RE: Great Dogs / Wieners of Georgia and the Southeast 2004/08/20 09:48:27 (permalink)
    My all time favorite hot dog joint is "Greene's Lunch" in Charlotte, NC. "Zack's" in Burlington, NC comes in a close second. But then I dress my dogs with mustard, chili, coleslaw and raw onions(and sometimes cheese).
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    steveindurham
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    RE: Great Dogs / Wieners of Georgia and the Southeast 2004/08/22 17:04:35 (permalink)
    Hillbilly - I grew up in Burlington and will get a second plug for Zack's. Another interesting thing in Burlington is a cheese dog which has no weiner just a long chunk of cheese covered with the same ingredients as a hot dog just without the meat. It definitely has a different taste.
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    signman
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    RE: Great Dogs / Wieners of Georgia and the Southeast 2004/08/25 01:35:21 (permalink)
    Just did a quick Roadfood trip to Atlanta, will be posting a full trip report soon, but my favorite meal was a couple of chili slaw dogs at the Varsity. These were better than I remember them from my last visit like 7 years ago.
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    RibDog
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    RE: Great Dogs / Wieners of Georgia and the Southeast 2004/08/25 09:11:35 (permalink)
    Down in St. Petersburg FL, there is a little lunch counter that looks a throwback to the 20s. It is the Coney Island Sandwich Shop at 250 9th St. N. in St. Pete. They don't make Chicago style dogs but their coney dogs are definitely a piece of nostalgia.

    John
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    Ted52
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    RE: Great Dogs / Wieners of Georgia and the Southeast 2004/10/05 15:27:38 (permalink)
    Article on Georgia Dog comparison, courtesy of USADEEPSOUTH at http://usads.ms11.net/ed.html

    Hot Dog! Nu-Way or Varsity?
    by Ed Williams


    Have y’all been keeping up with what’s going on at the movies lately? One of the biggest surprises this year has been the success of the film Freddy vs. Jason. As of this past weekend it was the top box office grossing film for two straight weeks, taking in close to eighty million dollars.
    This success has really taken critics by surprise, but, if you really think about it, it probably shouldn’t have. Freddy and Jason are the Frankenstein monster and Wolfman of this era, and everyone loves seeing two legendary horror characters battle it out to see who the baddest of the bad really is.

    Now, with that concept firmly in our minds, we need to think about other whispered and oft talked about match-ups. Match-ups that fire the imagination and get peoples’ tongues a-waggin’ about who might be the best in this or that situation. So, for all of us who hail from Georgia, and for all of us who have ever whispered or talked about this, we are now gonna discuss one of the most hotly debated questions of all time -- a question all true Georgians need an answer for, and a question that we’re gonna resolve right here.

    The question I‘m referring to is this: Which place has the best hot dogs, Nu-Way Weiners or The Varsity?

    Yeah, y’all heard me right, Nu-Way vs. The Varsity. If you come from Georgia, you can go ahead and skip on to the next paragraph. In case you’re a newcomer, the two best known hot dog establishments in our state are Nu-Way Weiners and The Varsity. Nu-Way hails from central Georgia, getting its start in Macon back in 1916, and is still going strong today with a number of mid-state locations. I’m also proud to say that I’m good friends with Spyros Dermatus, the President of Nu-Way Weiners. The only thing is, Spyros hasn’t slipped me any free Nu-Ways lately, so I’m more inclined to be somewhat objective in our upcoming contest.

    As for The Varsity, it’s been going strong in downtown Atlanta since 1928, and it’s also in one other location, which I will not mention here for personal moral reasons. Their hot dogs have been eaten by people all over the world, and, just to give you an idea of the scope of their operation, on the day of a big Georgia Tech vs. somebody game they can serve as many as 50,000 hot dogs.

    So, what we’re talking about here are the two heavyweights of Georgia hot dogs, the two undisputed champs. And, with those facts now firmly in place, it’s now time to decide which one of them is really the best.

    To properly evaluate them, we’re going to examine the following three factors:
    1. Who has the best chili dog?
    2. Who has the best slaw dog?
    3. Whose fries are the best?

    These are the true standards any proven hot dog gourmet would go by. And here’s how they shake out:



    1. Best chili dog - This is close, but Nu-Way has to get the nod. The Nu-Way chili dog is a work of art, Grecian chili, onions, mustard, and that great red hot dog. The Varsity’s version is real close - great chili, mustard, and a good dog as well. The one intangible that gives Nu-Way a real edge is that you order their chili dog “all the way.” Since the concept of “all the way” raises wonderful sexual connotations in my mind, I have to firmly give Nu-Way the nod on their offering.

    2. Best slaw dog - This is really close, as I love both establishments’ offerings, but I’ve gotta go with The Varsity’s slaw dog. Their slaw is outstanding, and it sort of blends into the flavor of the wiener, if that makes any sense. They also stack it in such a way that it hardly ever falls off the bun while you’re eating it, which is a real plus. Nu-Way has no reason not to hold its head up high, though. The New York Times, in a recent article, stated that Nu-Way had the best slaw dog in the entire USA! You can’t beat that with a stick, can you?

    3. Best fries - A statistical dead heat. I could total up the merits of either establishment’s offerings. Nu-Way’s are hotter, crispier, and longer. The Varsity’s are greasier and have a touch more flavor. So, this is a dead heat, any way you look at it.

    Now, as we look at our overall results, we can see that . . . what? Y’all think the results are inconclusive, and that this column has resolved nothing?

    Hmmmmmm, I sure do hate to hear that. I really, really do. I guess the only thing to do now is to start working on this column’s sequel . . .



    _____________________________

    BIO: Ed Williams
    Born in Forsyth, Georgia, Ed was raised in Juliette and is a proud product of the Monroe County public school system. His life took a decided turn in 1995 when he bought a home computer and began writing down wild old stories about his upbringing in Juliette. These stories, through an unusual series of events, were published in 1998 in hardback under the title, Sex, Dead Dogs, and Me: The Juliette Journals.
    Ed’s book started out in four bookstores in Macon, Georgia. Through word of mouth and the internet, eight months later he was being stocked nationally in the Books-A-Million chain. In December of 2000, Southern Charm Press (Atlanta) purchased the rights, and published the book in paperback. Since then, Ed's second book, entitled Rough As A Cob: More From the Juliette Journals, has been released (March 2003) in both hardback and trade paperback formats by River City Publishing. His third book, tentatively titled, Honin' The Tulip: Yet More Juliette Journals, is currently being considered for future publication.

    Recently, Ed appeared on the Georgia Public Radio program, "Cover to Cover," and has begun writing a weekly nationally syndicated newspaper column called Free Wheelin'. He is in demand as a speaker, and is already being compared to some of Georgia’s most noted humorists.

    Ed’s new book, Rough As A Cob, can be ordered by calling River City Publishing toll-free at: 877-408-7078. You can contact him via email at: ed3@ed-williams.com, or through his web site address at: Ed-Williams.com.
    #12
    speechpeach
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    RE: Great Dogs / Wieners of Georgia and the Southeast 2004/10/05 18:38:32 (permalink)
    last time that I ate at the Varsity, I was sad to discover that the chili cheese dog did not contain pimento cheese, just american cheese..fries still tasty but a tad greasy and limp, Nu-way and the Varsity are both about equal to me as far as food...and I always get a fried peach pie with almond toffee ice cream at the Varsity

    Laurie, a native Georgian who has eaten at most Varsity locations many times..(my father used to eat at the one in downtown Athens when he was in college many years ago)
    #13
    Ort. Carlton.
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    RE: Great Dogs / Wieners of Georgia and the Southeast 2004/11/21 20:58:34 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by speechpeach

    last time that I ate at the Varsity, I was sad to discover that the chili cheese dog did not contain pimento cheese, just american cheese..fries still tasty but a tad greasy and limp, Nu-way and the Varsity are both about equal to me as far as food...and I always get a fried peach pie with almond toffee ice cream at the Varsity

    Laurie, a native Georgian who has eaten at most Varsity locations many times..(my father used to eat at the one in downtown Athens when he was in college many years ago)


    Laurie,
    Been there, done that! The last chili dog served at the downtown Varsity location was eaten by (now late) retired Dean Of Men William Tate. The photo of him scarfing it down appeared on the front of that week's Athens Observer.
    There is a Chinese place in the location now.
    I am typing these words less than half a mile from the very spot. The world is indeed small. Thank you so much for posting!
    Getting Hungrily, Ort. Carlton in Drizzly Athens 30601.
    P. S. I still have yet to make it to Nu-Way Weiners in Macon. What should I ask for when I get there? Or should I simply go in blind and let my radar do the work? This tactic usually works for me....
    #14
    GigaShadow
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    RE: Great Dogs / Wieners of Georgia and the Southeast 2004/11/22 15:19:35 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by Ted52


    Lieutenant's Scrambled Dog

    Lieutenant Stevens serves hundreds of tasty, messy Scrambled Dogs six days a week at Dinglewood Pharmacy in Columbus. A hot dog and bun are split and splayed in a banana split dish and piled with dill pickles, mustard and cheese. Then the tour de force — a meaty, beany, rich, red flood of Lieutenant's special chili — fills the dish and drips over the sides. On top of that goes a shower of oyster crackers. With plenty of napkins and a spoon (to scoop up the tangy chili), you're ready to dig in.

    Lieutenant — that's the first name on his birth certificate — was born on Nov. 12, 1931, the day after Armistice Day (now Veterans Day). "They decided to name me in honor of the military," Stevens says of his parents. When he was 14, he went to work for Henry "Sport" Brown, the Scrambled Dog's creator. When Brown died in the 1950s, Stevens took over, tweaked the recipe and has been satisfying Columbus' craving ever since.

    Patrons who were children when they tasted their first Scrambled Dogs come back to introduce them to their children and grandchildren. Mondays through Saturdays, patrons fill and refill the dozen counter stools, five tables and five booths.

    "Lots of folks ask for my chili recipe," Stevens says with a smile, "but it's a home recipe and I don't give it. They have to come here to enjoy it."




    Way overrated. The actual hot dogs are a toxic bright pink color and as for scramble dogs... Just like most other native Southern dishes... yuck.
    #15
    Pogo
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    RE: Great Dogs / Wieners of Georgia and the Southeast 2004/11/22 16:16:53 (permalink)
    GigaShadow, next time you come down south, I'd like to get you some good southern cooking and then take you snipe hunting.

    Different than any other hotdog I have had anywhere else, Hiram Hickory House in Hiram, GA. They call it the "Dressed Dog", the bun is almost like those soft "sweet sixteen" rolls, split on top, with a meat sauce, onions and mustard. One will fill you up usually. Cost $1.50
    #16
    Ted52
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    RE: Great Dogs / Wieners of Georgia and the Southeast 2004/12/05 10:10:48 (permalink)
    Article Below on Nu-Way Wieners is Courtesy of "Tech Topics" Winter 2002, publication of the Georgia Tech Alumni Association

    Top Dogs

    Jimmy Cacavias, left, and Spyros Dermatas are the third-generation owners of Nu-Way Weiners
    Photo by Neil McGahee

    James Mallis stepped onto American soil in 1916 and into hot dog history.

    After several weeks at sea in the hold of a tramp steamer, the Greek immigrant arrived at Ellis Island to find New Yorkers abuzz about a new craze called a dachshund sausage or hot dog. Mallis soon moved to Macon, Ga., to be near fellow Greeks and began selling his own version of the hot dog — Nu- Way Weiners — for a nickel each. Mallis added chili, a new way of serving hot dogs — thus the restaurant’s name.

    Eighty-seven years and three generations later, the second-oldest continually operating hot dog restaurant in the United States is still going strong.

    Mallis’ great-nephews, Spyros Dermatas, IM 76, and Jimmy Cacavias, CE 79, oversee an operation that serves more than 4,500 weiners a day at 12 locations across central Georgia. Recently, the New York Times included the Nu-Way weiner in its list of the top 10 hot dogs in America.

    "Spyros and I are first cousins, and we grew up together in this business," Cacavias said. "Even after we left home to go to Georgia Tech, we sort of knew we would come back someday."

    Dermatas returned to Macon after graduation and has worked at Nu-Way ever since. Cacavias, however, spent 18 years working as a civil engineer in Columbia, S.C., before deciding to return.

    How do you sell a hot dog in a barbecue town?

    "We tell them our hot dogs are grilled, not boiled," Dermatas said. Ninety-nine percent of all hot dogs in America are boiled.

    "We use only the best ingredients — steamed buns, private-label wieners we have made just for us and, of course, the chili."

    Nu-Way’s famous chili — the recipe is a closely guarded family secret — simmers in a 40-gallon pot at the original Cotton Avenue restaurant before being shipped to the other locations.

    Not even an ocean it seems can ebb that passion for Nu-Ways. A former Royal Air Force pilot who trained at Cochran Field in Macon during World War II had such a craving for one that he traveled from London to Macon decades later.

    The national media exposure has also fed the craving.

    "In 1999, we were featured on a public television special about the best hot dogs in America, and that really started the ball rolling," Dermatas said. "Money magazine called and featured us, then the Times, and suddenly we started getting calls from all over the country. People were begging us to ship hot dogs to them.

    ©2002 Georgia Tech Alumni Association
    #17
    GigaShadow
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    RE: Great Dogs / Wieners of Georgia and the Southeast 2004/12/14 15:15:15 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by Pogo

    GigaShadow, next time you come down south, I'd like to get you some good southern cooking and then take you snipe hunting.

    Different than any other hotdog I have had anywhere else, Hiram Hickory House in Hiram, GA. They call it the "Dressed Dog", the bun is almost like those soft "sweet sixteen" rolls, split on top, with a meat sauce, onions and mustard. One will fill you up usually. Cost $1.50


    Hey I do live here - have for the past 12 years. Went to college in Columbus and still live in the area. I don't mind the South, but I hate the "native" cooking so to speak. Chicken fried whatever is disgusting. As for Lt's scramble dog - I guess it is popular because the place it is sold at is right across the street from the corporate headquarters of AFLAC.

    As for Varsity - you have to be kidding. It may have some historical value, but the food is terrible. I guess I was spoiled on the streets of Philly eating from vendors. Now I could easily down 5 or 6 of those hot dogs at a sitting.
    #18
    Adjudicator
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    RE: Great Dogs / Wieners of Georgia and the Southeast 2004/12/14 19:46:48 (permalink)
    In another view; lets change the subject matter a bit...

    Can anyone enlighten me as to "Great Dogs/Weiners of Georgia and the Southeast" manufacturers
    #19
    prius
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    RE: Great Dogs / Wieners of Georgia and the Southeast 2004/12/14 20:58:42 (permalink)
    As to GigaShadow...does the word Yankee conjur up an image?
    The Southern US probably has the greatest regional food of any of the nation's regions.
    #20
    Pogo
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    RE: Great Dogs / Wieners of Georgia and the Southeast 2004/12/14 23:30:54 (permalink)
    You still need to be taken out on a snipe hunt
    #21
    GigaShadow
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    RE: Great Dogs / Wieners of Georgia and the Southeast 2004/12/15 08:57:42 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by Pogo

    You still need to be taken out on a snipe hunt


    Can we hunt Unicorns and Bigfoot as well?

    I disagree that the Southern US has anywhere near the gretest food of any of the nations regions. Take hot dogs for example - they pale in comparison to examples offered by their northern counterparts. I would love to know where I could get anything remotely like what vendors in Philly or NYC sell down here. In my opinion it isn't so much the hot dog as it is the mustard and the way the hotdog is cooked that make it what it is. A grill and French's mustard just don't cut it.

    Prius, Yankee is an often overused term meant as a jab for those of us who have been either educated up north (where the school systems are much better) and/or have lived and concluded that there are indeed qualities of every region of this country that are better than others. Unfortunately, food in the south is not nearly as good as food in the northern parts of this country.
    #22
    Loner
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    RE: Great Dogs / Wieners of Georgia and the Southeast 2004/12/15 09:58:48 (permalink)
    I have to agree with giga. Having lived in both regions, you'll find some foods unique to the south, but the north has much better food overall.
    #23
    Ted52
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    RE: Great Dogs / Wieners of Georgia and the Southeast 2005/01/29 11:04:42 (permalink)
    The Atlanta Braves' Turner Field certainly offers an array of hot dogs to the uninitiated, including Ted's beloved Bison Dog. Note the stadium choices below.

    Hot Dogs / Sausages
    Ballpark Special 101, 117, 122, 140, 201, 217, 239, 303, 321, 404, 411
    Bison Dog 314, Plaza-West Pavilion
    Bratwurst 216, 333, Plaza-Left of Clubhouse Store
    Chicago Dog 207, 317, 421, Plaza-East Pavilion
    Chicken/Turkey Sausage w/ Artichokes & Garlic 333, Plaza-Left of Clubhouse Store
    Chicken/Turkey Sausage w/ Sundried Tomato 333, Plaza-Left of Clubhouse Store
    Chili Cheese Dog 102, 207, 314, 403, 421
    Georgia Dog 207, 317, 421, Plaza-East Pavilion
    Grilleworks Dog 216, 307, 314, 418, 433, Plaza-Left of Clubhouse Store
    Italian Sausage Plaza-Left of Clubhouse Store
    Juicy Jumbo Dog 101, 102, 103, 117, 120, 121, 122, 129, 135, 137, 140, 201, 216, 217, 222, 225, 226, 235, 239, 303, 307, 314, 321, 329, 404, 409, 410, 411, 412, 418, 419, 429, 411
    Jumbo Chicago Dog 207, 317, 421, Plaza-East Pavilion
    Jumbo Georgia Dog 207, 317, 421, Plaza-East Pavilion
    Jumbo New York Dog 207, 317, 421, Plaza-East Pavilion
    Jumbo Southwestern Dog 207, 317, 421, Plaza-East Pavilion
    Kiddy Dog Tooner Field
    Kosher Dog 137, 206, 419 Plaza-West Pavilion
    New York Dog 207, 317, 421, Plaza- East Pavilion
    Smoked Sausage 101, 117, 122, 140, 201, 217, 239, 303, 321, 404, 411
    Southwestern Dog 207, 317, 421, Plaza-East Pavilion
    Super Dog 101, 117, 122, 140, 201, 217, 239, 303, 321, 404, 411
    #24
    Ted52
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    RE: Great Dogs / Wieners of Georgia and the Southeast 2005/04/05 17:40:04 (permalink)
    Here in Atlanta, Charter Cable, tonight (April 5), Travel Channel, 8pm, they are advertising a 1-hour show called "Hot Dog Heaven." Worth a look?
    #25
    trsdos
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    RE: Great Dogs / Wieners of Georgia and the Southeast 2005/04/18 12:12:01 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by steveindurham

    Hillbilly - I grew up in Burlington and will get a second plug for Zack's. Another interesting thing in Burlington is a cheese dog which has no weiner just a long chunk of cheese covered with the same ingredients as a hot dog just without the meat. It definitely has a different taste.


    I worked at Zack's ( Manager, Cook ( i.e. Weenie Man ), etc ) off and on fron 1983 til 1995. Cheese Dogs with Chili is my all time Fav. I now live up in MAryland, but whenever I drive through Buriligton, I stop by
    #26
    ctfrasier
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    RE: Great Dogs / Wieners of Georgia and the Southeast 2005/04/22 13:27:29 (permalink)
    If you find yourself in Tennessee try The Dog house on Cedar ave. in Cookeville. They sell Detroit style hotdogs, not really certain what makes them Detroit style but they're pretty good. There is also a fairly new place in Nashville, Hot diggity Dogs is near downtown on Ewing Ave. You have to search for it but it's a pretty good lunch.
    #27
    skylar0ne
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    RE: Great Dogs / Wieners of Georgia and the Southeast 2005/04/22 13:33:33 (permalink)
    I gotta agree with Hillbilly on this one. A dog all the way from Green's lunch is a work of art. Green's is consistently noted in Best of Charlotte magazine as the best dog in the city.
    #28
    DaveM
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    RE: Great Dogs / Wieners of Georgia and the Southeast 2005/04/22 14:16:40 (permalink)
    Anything in the Charleston,SC-Savannah,GA-Florida Space Coast area?
    Heather and I will be staying in Mt. Pleasant,SC, Savannah,GA, and Titusville,FL on an upcoming May trip.
    So far we are aware of Jack's Cosmic Dogs in Mt. Pleasant,SC.
    First trip to Charleston and Savannah.
    First trip to Titusville area, but second time to FL
    Flying into Orlando, driving up coast only as far noth as Charleston.
    Thanks, Dave M
    #29
    Ted52
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    RE: Great Dogs / Wieners of Georgia and the Southeast 2005/07/16 12:23:12 (permalink)
    Finding Your Favorite Hot Dog
    by Heidi Edidin, Restaurant Critic for "South Charlotte Weekly"

    POSTED: 4:18 a.m. EDT August 14, 2003


    Lisa and Peter Fleck, owners of Buzzy & Bear's Grill, enjoy a flame-broiled slaw dog on their "signature" griddle-toasted roll.

    Hot-diggity-dog! I've spent the several weeks taste-tasting the official food of summer -- the hot dog.

    It has been an informal tasting expedition and I have by no means tried every dawg in Charlotte, but I've eaten my share I can assure you. So, take this as some advance guidance on just where to find the best hot dogs in the Queen City and get ready to eat your share.

    Before I begin, a couple of tasting notes:
    I grew up in Jacksonville, Fla., but my Dad was from Chicago and my Mom from Boston. In our house hot dogs were served with mustard and relish. Ketchup was reserved for hamburgers, fries and occasionally used as a spread for leftover meatloaf sandwiches, but never, ever, did we eat ketchup on hot dogs. These days I still look for mustard, relish and occasionally sauerkraut on a good dog, and that is what I went in search of here.

    During my hot dog eating adventure, my 6-year-old niece, Mariah Edidin, joined me for a week - to visit me (and my cat, Scruffy) from her home in Seattle for her annual trip to "Camp Heidi." I took her with me to sample hot dogs in several locales and learned a lot about what children look for in a great hot dog.

    First, and foremost - there is to be none of the "all the way" stuff that the grownups like to order. Mariah's actual comment was, " No way I'm eating that!" when she saw the dog I ordered topped with chili, slaw, mustard, relish and onions. No, Mariah, like most kids her age, likes her dogs unadorned and unadulterated. She ordered hers plain. If there were to be any condiments, it was ketchup and mustard only, please. In addition, kids also seem to prefer their hot dogs boiled or steamed rather than grilled and prefer them to be served on soft steamed buns. None of that hard crusty skin and stuff for them, although, to be frank (pardon the pun), the "hard crusty skin" and the snap of a bite it renders are my favorite part of eating a hot dog.

    I started my pursuit for the best dog in Charlotte at a cute little hot dog stand I saw at Metrolina Flea Market. Buzzy & Bear's Grill offers flame-broiled dogs and brats with a half dozen or so variations on the theme. I was pleased to think I had hit gold from the start. Grilled to perfection, these dogs are served on toasted buns with your choice of condiments, including homemade chili, fresh-made slaw, white wine kraut, mustard, onions, relish and yes, even ketchup. You can taste B&B's hot dogs, German Brats, Sweet Italian Sausages, polish Kielbasa and their delicious home-smoked pork barbecue at Metrolina the first weekend of every month, in addition to catching them for lunch at 101 South Tryon St., across from the First Citizens Building, from around 11 a.m. or so until about 2:30 p.m. on Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursdays.

    Next Mariah and I had a dog or two at one of my favorite neighborhood spots, Five Steps Down on Middleton Drive just off Providence Road. This little pub and sandwich shop is located just "five steps down" under the recently reviewed Primo Tuscan Grille. The dogs here are steamed and served on soft buns, but still full of flavor. Get them any way you like - the slaw and chili are both good - served with a side of your choice.

    Mariah and I also hit the hot dog shop in the food court at Carolina Place, Frank N' Stein. This place is another winner, offering a variety of dogs and sausages in a number of sizes with lots of different toppings. I particularly like the kraut here, served steaming hot; it's my idea of the perfect way to top a tube steak, and Mariah's plain dog with ketchup and mustard yielded a big "thumbs up."

    After I took Mariah back to Seattle, I was feeling a bit like a stuffed tube steak myself, and decided to take a break for a couple of days. During my hot dog hiatus, I attended a little wine tasting and the subject eventually turned from wine to my lastest eating exploits. At the mere mention of the word "hot dog" a group of guys - all avid golfers - stopped to tell me where to find the best dogs in the city. They're "at the turn" at Myers Park Country Club! Now, the hitch here is that Myers Park is a private club, and so to taste these dogs you have to befriend a member of Myers Park and ask for an invitation to lunch (and maybe a round of golf). Know that it will be worth any means of persuasion you might need to employ - these are indeed great dogs. They come hot, straight off the grill with chili or without. Condiments include a sweet red pepper relish, dark and yellow mustard, grated cheese, pickle relish, chopped onions, mayo, ketchup and hot sauce. The chili is quite good and the red pepper relish is fabulous. A perfect way to take a time out between the nines. I would be remiss here if I didn't also mention that in addition to the hot dogs, the fine dining at Myers Park is also superb. So, if you've talked your friend into the invitation to lunch, talk a bit harder and longer and get yourself invited over for dinner - it's a wonderful dining experience!

    After lunch at the club, I dropped by Spoon's Restaurant, the one on Hawthorne Lane. Spoon's has been in Charlotte a long time and in addition to great dogs, there are also fine burgers, and, of course, those triple-thick short, square ice cream sandwiches.

    After Spoon's, it was over to the Soda Shop at Park Road Shopping Center. You can eat at booths or at the counter or get your dogs to go. The chili here is fare to middlin', but the slaw is quite good and the dogs themselves pretty tasty.

    At 617 Sharon Amity, you can pick up a great dog at Eddie's Place-Danny's Too, located in the same shopping strip as Hotel Charlotte. In addition to serving breakfast anytime and a host of entrees with a slight New Orleans flavor, Eddie's offers Bernie's Hot Dogs, big grilled dog served one or two to an order, grilled with a choice of chili, slaw, mustard and ketchup.

    Katz NY Deli tucked away at the back of the Arboretum Office Park at 8045 Providence Road also offers a great grilled dog in two different sizes. There's the all-beef frank, the smaller of the two or the all-beef special, a large grilled knockwurst. Both are served topped with your choice of all the standard condiments, plus great sauerkraut, with homemade slaw and a sour kosher pickle served on the side. Try these dogs with Katz' homemade fresh-cut fries - delish!

    In the SouthPark area? Drop in at Arthur's on the first floor of Belk - it's really not as hard to get around all the construction as it seems. The hot dogs here are served on a hard hoagie roll - a nice change of pace from steamed buns, served with grilled-to-order onions, chili, relish and mustard. While you're there, stop by the wine shop, browse through the selection of fine wines and tell my good friend Robert Balsley to set you up with a bottle of something nice for some summertime sippin'.

    Finally, it's over to Phillips Place to Spot'z for Gourmet Dogs and Frozen Custards. The dogs here are grilled, served in a half dozen or so specialty combinations. My faves are the Carolina Dog with mustard, onions, chili and slaw; and the Parthenon dog with a creamy tzaziki sauce, onions, lettuce, tomatoes and parsley; but I ended my taste-testing with the Windy City Dog, a Midwest classic topped with mustard, relish, pickle wedges, tomato and celery salt and served with a root beer float.
    Six-year-old Mariah Edidin enjoys her hot dogs with ketchup and mustard only, please.


    Well-known Charlotte restaurant critic, food writer, cooking instructor and connoisseur of food and wine, Heidi Edidin writes "South Charlotte Weekly: Culinary Corner," a restaurant review or food feature that appears weekly. Contact Heidi with questions and restaurant, food or story ideas by email at heidi@southcharlotteweekly.com.

    SCW photos by Sean Busher.
    #30
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