Homemade Hot Dogs??

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Foodbme
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2009/01/04 23:28:18 (permalink)

Homemade Hot Dogs??

Have you ever made your own Hot Dogs? Me neither------ BUT I'm thinking about giving it a try. I found this recipe and wondered if any of my fellow dog lovers had a recipe they used. If so, how 'bout posting it here.
Granted, this looks like a lot of work but that's what makes the results worthwhile! 
HOMEMADE HOT DOGS
Hot dogs or frankfurters are nothing more than ground meat with seasonings.
They are easy to make at home with about an hour of time invested.
You can make these all beef or all pork, if you wish.
\Feel free to adjust the seasonings to suit your own personal tastes.
Plan ahead to find the casings, usually available at your local butcher shop.
Prep Time: 1 hours,
Cook Time: 20 minutes
Ingredients:
3 feet sheep or small (1-1/2-inch diameter) hog casings
1 pound lean pork, cubed
3/4 pound lean beef, cubed
1/4 pound pork fat, cubed
1/4 cup very finely minced onion
1 small clove garlic, finely chopped
1 teaspoon finely ground coriander
1/4 teaspoon dried marjoram
1/4 teaspoon ground mace
1/2 teaspoon ground mustard seed
1 teaspoon sweet paprika
1 teaspoon freshly fine ground white pepper
1 egg white
1-1/2 teaspoons sugar
1 teaspoon salt, or to taste
1/4 cup milk
Preparation:
Prepare the casings (see instructions below).
In a blender or food processor, make a puree of the onion, garlic, coriander, marjoram, mace,
mustard seed, and paprika. Add the pepper, egg white, sugar, salt, and milk and mix thoroughly.
Grind the pork, beef, and fat cubes through the fine blade separately.
Mix together and grind again. Mix the seasonings into the meat mixture with your hands.
This tends to be a sticky procedure, so wet your hands with cold water first.
Chill the mixture for half an hour then put the mixture thorough the fine blade of the grinder once more.
Stuff the casings and twist them off into six-inch links. Parboil the links (without separating them) in
gently simmering water for 20 minutes.
Place the franks in a bowl of ice water and chill thoroughly.
Remove, pat dry, and refrigerate. Because they are precooked, they can be refrigerated for up to a week or they can be frozen.
Preparing the Casing
Snip off about four feet of casing. (Better too much than too little because any extra can be repacked
 in salt and used later.) Rinse the casing under cool running water to remove any salt clinging to it.
Place it in a bowl of cool water and let it soak for about half an hour.
While you're waiting for the casing to soak, you can begin preparing the meat as detailed above.
After soaking, rinse the casing under cool running water.
Slip one end of the casing over the faucet nozzle.
Hold the casing firmly on the nozzle, and then turn on the cold water, gently at first,
and then more forcefully. This procedure will flush out any salt in the casing and pinpoint any breaks.
 Should you find a break, simply snip out a small section of the casing.
Place the casing in a bowl of water and add a splash of white vinegar.
A tablespoon of vinegar per cup of water is sufficient. The vinegar softens the casing a bit more
and makes it more transparent, which in turn makes your sausage more pleasing to the eye.
Leave the casing in the water/vinegar solution until you are ready to use it.
Rinse it well and drain before stuffing.
Source: Home Sausage Making by Charles G. Reavis (Storey Books)
 
post edited by Foodbme - 2009/01/04 23:34:15
#1

15 Replies Related Threads

    FriedClamFanatic
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    Re:Homemade Hot Dogs?? 2009/01/05 10:25:23 (permalink)
    Looks good!  I've never done hotdogs, but I make a lot of sausage.
    #2
    WarToad
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    Re:Homemade Hot Dogs?? 2009/01/05 11:39:27 (permalink)
    I watched an Alton Brown episode on sausage making, and he touched briefly on hot dogs and his advise was baisically "go ahead and try, but prepare for disappointment".  You have to so highly mince the meat and fat and emulsify it to such a degree it is nearly impossible for the home cook to replicate what professional butchers do with commercial equipment to achieve the smoothness of texture in a hot dog.  The home version of hot dogs inevitable turn out more like beef sausage and gets called "close enough".

    I encourage you to try though.  I'd like to.
    post edited by WarToad - 2009/01/05 11:40:48
    #3
    fabulousoyster
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    Re:Homemade Hot Dogs?? 2009/01/05 12:01:33 (permalink)
    I've tasted homemade hot dogs and I did'nt like them (I did'nt make them).  Always preferred store bought.  WarToad's advice is right.
    #4
    Foodbme
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    Re:Homemade Hot Dogs?? 2009/01/05 14:42:35 (permalink)
    WarToad

    I watched an Alton Brown episode on sausage making, and he touched briefly on hot dogs and his advise was baisically "go ahead and try, but prepare for disappointment".  You have to so highly mince the meat and fat and emulsify it to such a degree it is nearly impossible for the home cook to replicate what professional butchers do with commercial equipment to achieve the smoothness of texture in a hot dog.  The home version of hot dogs inevitable turn out more like beef sausage and gets called "close enough".

    I encourage you to try though.  I'd like to.


    I agree with your analysis & realize the shortcomings involved but would just like to try it just so I can say I tried it! I'm still interested to see if any one comes forward who has actually tried it as well. Where are you John Fox??
    #5
    MiamiDon
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    Re:Homemade Hot Dogs?? 2009/01/05 16:00:02 (permalink)
    WarToad

    I watched an Alton Brown episode on sausage making, and he touched briefly on hot dogs and his advise was baisically "go ahead and try, but prepare for disappointment".  You have to so highly mince the meat and fat and emulsify it to such a degree it is nearly impossible for the home cook to replicate what professional butchers do with commercial equipment to achieve the smoothness of texture in a hot dog.  The home version of hot dogs inevitable turn out more like beef sausage and gets called "close enough".

    I encourage you to try though.  I'd like to.


    Ditto.  I've heard that from numerous sources.  Evidently the emulsification step is the problem.  Not to say that Foodbme won't enjoy the result, but it probably won't have the bologna/frankfurter texture.
    #6
    Greyghost
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    Re:Homemade Hot Dogs?? 2009/01/05 18:41:05 (permalink)
    This recipe describes sausage, not hot dogs. Where is the sodium nitrite? Where is the red dye #2? Personally, I think this recipe is bogus. Years ago when I had a great meat grinder, I made a great deal of sausage and made about 20 pounds at a time. What I was looking for was salt free sausage and it turned out great every time. All I did to achieve great results was
    to increase the amount of seasonings and freeze what I was not using ant the moment.
     
    By all means try that recipe, but I think you will be highly disappointed.
    #7
    Reaper
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    Re:Homemade Hot Dogs?? 2009/01/07 20:19:00 (permalink)
    I do not think red dye is necessary the nitrates will give you the red color, at home I would cool the meat to just freezing and fine grind it 2-3 times then let the meat warm to around 50-60 degrees and food process into a paste, the warmer meat will emulsify better.

    Stuff the emulsified meat into sheep casing and link.

    Hang in a cool area 50 deg for a couple hours to let the casings dry and the meat to bloom.

    Cooking the hot dogs in a smoker, very light smoke, or a large steam cabinet, bring the links to about 165 deg remove and shower the links in cold water to shrink the casings, store in a refridgerator until ready to use.

    Most butchers do not carry sheep casings.

    Commercial hot dog makers us a bowl cutter to emulsify the meat.


    Linking tutorial,
    http://www.btinternet.com/~happydudevir/sausagemaking.html

    Casings, and supplies, I think the famous sausage maker Rytek Kutas started this company,
    http://www.sausagemaker.com/

    The best resources on the planet for making sausage,
    http://forum.sausagemaking.org/
    http://home.pacbell.net/lpoli/

    This is how to make hot dogs in 15 seconds and is not complete, the links I provided is more than enough to get anyone started, if you have more questions ask.

    Mitch
    post edited by Reaper - 2009/01/07 20:27:16
    #8
    Foodbme
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    Re:Homemade Hot Dogs?? 2009/01/07 20:45:40 (permalink)
    Reaper

    I do not think red dye is necessary the nitrates will give you the red color, at home I would cool the meat to just freezing and fine grind it 2-3 times then let the meat warm to around 50-60 degrees and food process into a paste, the warmer meat will emulsify better.

    Stuff the emulsified meat into sheep casing and link.

    Hang in a cool area 50 deg for a couple hours to let the casings dry and the meat to bloom.

    Cooking the hot dogs in a smoker, very light smoke, or a large steam cabinet, bring the links to about 165 deg remove and shower the links in cold water to shrink the casings, store in a refridgerator until ready to use.

    Most butchers do not carry sheep casings.

    Commercial hot dog makers us a bowl cutter to emulsify the meat.


    Linking tutorial,
    http://www.btinternet.com/~happydudevir/sausagemaking.html

    Casings, and supplies, I think the famous sausage maker Rytek Kutas started this company,
    http://www.sausagemaker.com/

    The best resources on the planet for making sausage,
    http://forum.sausagemaking.org/
    http://home.pacbell.net/lpoli/

    This is how to make hot dogs in 15 seconds and is not complete, the links I provided is more than enough to get anyone started, if you have more questions ask.

    Mitch

     
    Mitch,
    THANX for your Great Info! I appreciate your input and will follow your advice!


    #9
    analei
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    Re:Homemade Hot Dogs?? 2009/02/08 20:34:01 (permalink)
    Greyghost

    This recipe describes sausage, not hot dogs. Where is the sodium nitrite? Where is the red dye #2? Personally, I think this recipe is bogus. Years ago when I had a great meat grinder, I made a great deal of sausage and made about 20 pounds at a time. What I was looking for was salt free sausage and it turned out great every time. All I did to achieve great results was
    to increase the amount of seasonings and freeze what I was not using ant the moment.
     
    By all means try that recipe, but I think you will be highly disappointed.


    Gosh, you are hilarious in regards to the red dye and sodium nitrates. What about mechanically seperated chicken, beef, etc...what exactly is that. LOL.
     
     
    #10
    John A
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    Re:Homemade Hot Dogs?? 2009/02/09 07:10:40 (permalink)
    Have you done it?
    #11
    RodBangkok
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    Re:Homemade Hot Dogs?? 2009/02/09 08:52:03 (permalink)
    The art, and it is an art, of making good sausages, emulsified or not, is also a science.  That's what make's it both fun and challenging.  If your serious about exploring this art it takes a lot of time, and study, some special equipment and much more effort to develop good formula's.   But it can be done, but not something you just want to try once on a Sunday and expect any results.
    #12
    euclid
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    Re:Homemade Hot Dogs?? 2009/02/10 10:19:55 (permalink)
       I make venison bologna and use the spices from the Sausage Maker (Reaper is right on). I can assure you it is better than any store bought bologna of any kind. Yes, it's work but the end result is very much worth the effort. I can't imagine dogs would be any more of an effort than bologna other than the number of casings you would have to stuff with the dogs.
       Go for it.
    #13
    Reaper
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    Re:Homemade Hot Dogs?? 2009/02/14 11:23:20 (permalink)
    RodBangkok

    The art, and it is an art, of making good sausages, emulsified or not, is also a science.  That's what make's it both fun and challenging.  If your serious about exploring this art it takes a lot of time, and study, some special equipment and much more effort to develop good formula's.   But it can be done, but not something you just want to try once on a Sunday and expect any results.


    I believe research, good advice from someone that has made sausage before and a good recipe your first attempt will be good to excellent, at least better than store bought.

    Making hot dogs is a challenge, you do need more than a hand grinder you need a powerful food processor, I had a Hamilton Beach Big mouth $80.00 it worked fine.

    I am in total agreement with Euclid.
    #14
    claracamille
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    Re:Homemade Hot Dogs?? 2009/02/21 14:17:34 (permalink)
    Making sausage was the last thing that was done on butchering day at my grandparents.  Butchering day was always on a cold sunny November day.  All the neighbors pitched in to help. 
     
    1st, the intestines were taken to smoke house when a group of neighbor ladies prepared the intestines for stuffing.  I don't remember how they got rid of the "pig stuff" that was in them when they came from the pig, but I do remember being fascinated by how the ladies cleaned them.  First, they turned them inside out & began a series of soakings.  I know that they had to be very careful not to break or put even a small hole in the intestines as that would allow the sausage to come out of the hole or break when they were stuffed.
     
    2nd, as the pigs where being cut apart,every little scrap was placed in a galvinized wash pan.  At the end of the day all the small pieces of meat & also some larger chunks of pig would first be ground up with some pig fat, then seasonings were added.  Then my grandmother would fry a small patty on the coals stove and taste it for seasoning.  She always got it right the first time.
     
    3rd, the raw sausage would be put into the saugage maker, intestines placed on the spout, & the sausage would be pushed out into the intestine.  What sausage was not eaten freh that week was canned.
     
    Everyone  took home fresh meat & sausage.  Lard was also made in a big iron pot over a wood fire.  The cracklings left over from the lard making were out of this world.
    #15
    Foodbme
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    Re:Homemade Hot Dogs?? 2009/02/22 19:55:23 (permalink)
    claracamille

    Making sausage was the last thing that was done on butchering day at my grandparents.  Butchering day was always on a cold sunny November day.  All the neighbors pitched in to help. 
     
    1st, the intestines were taken to smoke house when a group of neighbor ladies prepared the intestines for stuffing.  I don't remember how they got rid of the "pig stuff" that was in them when they came from the pig, but I do remember being fascinated by how the ladies cleaned them.  First, they turned them inside out & began a series of soakings.  I know that they had to be very careful not to break or put even a small hole in the intestines as that would allow the sausage to come out of the hole or break when they were stuffed.
     
    2nd, as the pigs where being cut apart,every little scrap was placed in a galvinized wash pan.  At the end of the day all the small pieces of meat & also some larger chunks of pig would first be ground up with some pig fat, then seasonings were added.  Then my grandmother would fry a small patty on the coals stove and taste it for seasoning.  She always got it right the first time.
     
    3rd, the raw sausage would be put into the saugage maker, intestines placed on the spout, & the sausage would be pushed out into the intestine.  What sausage was not eaten freh that week was canned.
     
    Everyone  took home fresh meat & sausage.  Lard was also made in a big iron pot over a wood fire.  The cracklings left over from the lard making were out of this world.


    You paint a Beautiful picture!
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