Info for birders

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Pwingsx
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2006/07/21 16:20:32 (permalink)

Info for birders

This is for Sundancer and others who are into bird-watching. Now, bear in mind that this story may only have made it out here by now, but that you may already know about it, so if so, forgive my redundancy!

http://www.thedenverchannel.com/politics/9549809/detail.html
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    6star
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    RE: Info for birders 2006/07/21 16:26:15 (permalink)
    This story made it to the AP news on Excite yesterday, so it really isn't old news.
    #2
    Sundancer7
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    RE: Info for birders 2006/07/21 17:57:18 (permalink)
    I have been watching this for a couple of years. I doubt that the Ivory Bill Woodpecker has been spotted and I doubt its existence. I sincerely wish it was still around though.

    I have been in this part of Akransas although it has been a few years.

    Paul E. Smith
    Knoxville, TN
    #3
    seafarer john
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    RE: Info for birders 2006/07/21 19:53:19 (permalink)
    I'd rather have the bird's habitat , even without the bird, than a thousand acres of new rice paddies - and I like rice, I'm having it for dinner tonight.

    Cheers, John
    #4
    mayor al
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    RE: Info for birders 2006/07/21 20:53:51 (permalink)
    I hung out in some Rice paddies about 43 years ago in a Galaxy far-far away. I don't EVER consider visiting Rice Growing areas if I can help it! I do enjoy some rice dishes, but I try not to think about the source when I do eat them!

    We do have some "full-sized" Woodpeckers here in Indiana, as well as the smaller versions. The full-sized have wingspans similiar to a Hawk or Owl and are really fun to watch in action.
    #5
    Davydd
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    RE: Info for birders 2006/07/21 23:54:59 (permalink)
    We have pileated woodpeckers in our yard. That's about as big as they get unless the Ivory Bill truly exists. They are monsters and can put a hole the size of a fist in a tree trunk in a matter of a couple of minutes. They also did that to our cedar shingle house last year. We are taking down 6 giant cottonwood trees this week in our yard and I noticed the pileated woodpecker was back checking out the downed trunks. I have a love/hate for them. It is exciting to see them but I also think about my Powershot air rifle a lot when I see them.

    From our kitchen window
    #6
    mayor al
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    RE: Info for birders 2006/07/22 16:00:26 (permalink)
    Davydd I am getting pretty good with 'Bird SAMS' otherwise known as Bottle Rockets. I use them to remove Crows and Mockingbirds from our fruit trees and garden. Not-Terminal, but scares them if I can get close enough to time the explosion to be like Flak or Triple A.
    Thanks for your photo, that is the large Woodpecker we see in this area also.
    #7
    Sundancer7
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    RE: Info for birders 2006/07/22 16:12:01 (permalink)
    I have multiple pileated in my neighborhood also. That is Woody Woodpecker. They are beautiful and their call is like a jungle bird. I like to watch them during the mating season when several of them will chase each other around the tree.

    We also have the Red Bellied, downy , hairy and the red headed that I see on a very frequent basis although the downy is a winter visitor only and tends to beat holes in my house.

    Paul E. Smith
    Knoxville, TN
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    Pwingsx
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    RE: Info for birders 2006/07/22 20:06:35 (permalink)
    The birds back east are so much more plentiful and colorful than out here in the high desert and plains.

    Nothing beats the call of a meadowlark though. And a little rufus hummingbird is a sweet addition.

    Grackles are beautifully iridescent but they creak like old screen doors and chase the songbirds away. Damned garbage birds.

    We've got a bumper crop of bats this year, thanks to a hot early spring, then a wet July and now the heat again. Bugs galore. Are there lots of bats around anywhere else?
    #9
    mayor al
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    RE: Info for birders 2006/07/22 20:35:32 (permalink)
    Pwing
    Our neighbor have a large -unused- Barn right next to our property line. There are hundreds of small Bats that come out of it nightly during the summer months. As a result we are fairly mosquito free while folks a mile or so away complain of the buzzbombers now and then. It is real interesting to watch the Bats go after Fireflies in the evening.
    #10
    Sundancer7
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    RE: Info for birders 2006/07/22 20:40:51 (permalink)
    I have no idea what species of bats we have but I see them every morning. They chases all of the bugs away.

    I sure do enjoy the mammals that can fly.

    Paul E. Smith
    Knoxville, TN
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    Jimeats
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    RE: Info for birders 2006/07/23 05:30:12 (permalink)
    Bats have always fasinated me, up here in New England we have the common brown bat. They only produce one offspring a year and migrate to caves in upstate N.Y. for the winter hibernation, the only time they winter over is if the roost conditions are favorable or it's their last season and a permanent retirement is on the horizon. I built a Bat house/condo/time share a few years ago but no residents yet. The guy down the road from me is tearing down an old barn in the late fall where there is about 3 dozen known bats so I might get luckey next spring. It's 5:20 a.m. here and looking out my window they are fairly active now it's always a pleasue to watch them. It's amazing how the older you get some of the simplest things in life become enjoyable. Chow Jim
    #12
    mayor al
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    RE: Info for birders 2006/07/26 15:01:24 (permalink)
    Wed. July 26 Here is a shot I just took a few minutes ago, looking out my front window at our Finch Feeder. The bird in flight (sorry I didn't get to freeze him in motion) had just been kicked off the feeded by the little guy who is facing the camera. (--Canon D20 ASA200 1/400th at f 5.6--)
    I love photographing birds with the digital...it took 11 tries to get this one!

    #13
    Pwingsx
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    RE: Info for birders 2006/07/26 19:48:32 (permalink)
    Lovely pic.
    #14
    Sundancer7
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    RE: Info for birders 2006/07/26 20:30:12 (permalink)
    This is the bird count from my deck yesterday. All of the below were seen without the use of binoculars. I even missed a few. The deck is our zoo with the additional possums, chipmunks, groundhogs, squirrels and the fish that boil the water for the residual duck food that is in the water.

    : Great Blue heron
    2: Black crown night heron
    3: Sparrow
    4: Carolina wren
    5: Cardinal
    6: Towhee
    7: Kingfisher
    8 Bluejay
    9: Titmouse
    10: Carolina Chickadee
    11: Osprey
    12 Red tail hawk
    13: Ruby Throad hummingbird
    14: Mallard
    15: Wood duck
    16: Eastern kingbird
    17: Flycatcher
    18: little Green heron
    19: Mileormore bird
    20: Mockingbird
    21: Robin
    22: Brown Thrasher

    Birding is fun.
    Paul E. Smith
    Knoxville, TN
    #15
    seafarer john
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    RE: Info for birders 2006/07/26 21:53:20 (permalink)
    Sundancer: that's a great list for one day of casual watching from your deck, but what the Hell is a mileormore bird?

    Cheers, John
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    6star
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    RE: Info for birders 2006/07/27 01:34:12 (permalink)
    According to Geb Bixer, "A Mileormore Bird is a bird that flys backwards, whistles through its XXXXXXX, and you can hear it for a mile or more!"
    #17
    Sundancer7
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    RE: Info for birders 2006/07/27 03:58:17 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by 6star

    According to Geb Bixer, "A Mileormore Bird is a bird that flys backwards, whistles through its XXXXXXX, and you can hear it for a mile or more!"


    6Star, you nailed it

    Paul E. Smith
    Knoxville, TN
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    seafarer john
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    RE: Info for birders 2006/07/27 09:18:26 (permalink)
    When we asked the naturalist at Okeefenokee swamp to help usidentify a bird he looked, looked again, thought it over, and announced we had an "L.B.B."- Little Brown Bird.

    Cheers, John
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    Sundancer7
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    RE: Info for birders 2006/07/27 09:26:22 (permalink)
    Bushie had an interesting sighting the other day. He emailed me and indicated that he had spotted a bird on his fence that was blue, red and yellow. I had never seen one before but I identified it as a painted bunting. I sent him a pic and the notes about the bird. He emailed me back and indicated that I had nailed it. I have been birding for 40 years and had never seen one.

    http://audubon2.org/webapp/watchlist/viewSpecies.jsp?id=156

    Paul E. Smith
    Knoxville, TN
    #20
    seafarer john
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    RE: Info for birders 2006/07/27 11:54:45 (permalink)
    When Bushie reports a blue red and yellow bird, I'd say he's been too much into the Scotch...

    cheers, John
    #21
    Sundancer7
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    RE: Info for birders 2006/07/27 12:23:07 (permalink)
    I am not sure Bushie is a Scotch dude. I think his sighting was real.

    Paul E. Smith
    Knoxville, TN
    #22
    Pwingsx
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    RE: Info for birders 2006/07/27 12:50:06 (permalink)
    I would love to see that! Most of the birds in Colorado are brown, brown, and brown. With an occasional blue jay or red-winged blackbird. And the irridescent grackles, of course. But mostly brown.

    We have lots of flickers, thrushes, sparrows, wrens, doves, hawks, meadowlarks, some finches (mostly brown). Have you nodded off yet?

    Of course, we also have bears and coyotes and mountain lions. And that's just in the backyards! (not kidding).
    #23
    mbrookes
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    RE: Info for birders 2006/07/27 13:48:17 (permalink)
    How fun to find fellow birders!
    We have indigo buntings and painted buntings. We also have true blue birds, which are not found in the Mississipppi Delta. Having lived there most of my life, I can only assume it is because they mate for life, so do not fit in with the rest of the population.
    A while back I saw my first anhinga at the reservoir. What a sight!!!
    #24
    Sundancer7
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    RE: Info for birders 2006/07/27 14:15:13 (permalink)
    We have blue birds that nest on our property. They have three families per season. It is so much fun to see them raise their families. We have the indigo's but not the painted buntings.

    My deck is only about 20 feet from the Tennessee River and it allows us a perfect view of the Tennessee River zoo.

    Paul E. Smith
    Knoxville, TN
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    mayor al
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    RE: Info for birders 2006/07/27 14:48:35 (permalink)
    We have several bluebird houses around the property and they seem to stay occupied most of the time. They do get upset if we clean out the old nests between their 'litters'. We also have a couple of what could be called emergency shelters that I have posted before...where Bluebirds will seek 'group' shelter during a storm or extra cold night.here are a couple hiding from a nasty storm last year.


    Today we will add a bright male GoldFinch for those of you suffering from the 'dull-color' syndrome! Taken just a few minutes ago at our feeder. We moved the feeder closer to the house so I can get some good Finch shots.



    Got a couple of good hummingbird feeding shots a bit ago also. Looks like they are debating who has the better luncheon, the Bowens or the Neighbors!





    When it comes to animals, we have the normal run of the farm/woods list for this area. 5 deer wandered thru the yard last evening and before I could get a bottle rocket off to scare them, they cleaned off several young apples from one of my trees. Not long ago we had a raccoon with an injured leg visit the porch to raid a birdfeeding tray.

    OK Enough playing with the camera for a bit.
    #26
    Jimeats
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    RE: Info for birders 2006/07/27 15:03:48 (permalink)
    Paul nice link, I've got those cow birds up here also, they have been around for about the past ten years or so. The only odd birds I've seen recently is a yellow crowned night herron, snowy white owl and have been seeing Baltimore oriles, it's been quite awhile since last seeing them, nice their back. Oh and a pair of wood ducks not that common up here. Chow Jim
    #27
    Sundancer7
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    RE: Info for birders 2006/07/27 15:04:06 (permalink)
    Al, great shots. The racoons visit my dog food each evening. The gold finch at with me every day and the blue birds are everywhere. I do not have deer at my place but I see them pretty frequently just a little bit down the road.

    I have noticed that during the winter on a warm day, the blue birds will come out in numbers and hang around my roof. I have no idea why???. Sometimes there will be 15-20 of them at one time.

    Paul E. Smith
    Knoxville, TN
    #28
    tmiles
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    RE: Info for birders 2006/07/27 16:14:50 (permalink)
    We are not getting too many Bluebirds up her in the middle of Massachusetts, but when I was a kid, we had none. Now I see them 2 or 3 times a season. Our cats stay inside, but several others patrol our fields on a regular basis, and that may get the Bluebirds to go elsewhere. The cats themselves are hunted by coyotes.

    We had fewer than usual Barn Swallows return this spring, but they are all now raising a second brood, so by fall, I will have more leave than usual. Under good conditions, bird populations can recover quickly. In my lifetime, Eagles and Turkeys have been reintroduced to Massachusetts, and both populations are doing very well. The Bluebirds were never totally gone, and are making a slow comback. On the other hand we have spent many millions on the Salmon project, and do not yet have a viable breeding population where they SHOULD be able to survive.

    I had the honor to know Jack Swedberg, who as a state employee, had a key role in the Bald Eagle restoration project.
    #29
    Pwingsx
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    RE: Info for birders 2006/07/28 14:33:36 (permalink)
    Those bluebirds are so beautiful. I so much wish we had those out here -- the Rocky Mountain bluebirds pretty much stay in the mountains. They don't venture quite so far out on the plains as we are.

    I wish we had cardinals too.
    #30
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