Korean BBQ & Other Culinary Misnomers

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Treetop Tom
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2013/09/07 11:25:47 (permalink)

Korean BBQ & Other Culinary Misnomers

Our discussion on the BBQ board regarding Korean BBQ (which, while not, strictly speaking, BBQ has become part of eating lexicon) got me thinking about other misnamed foods.  Two examples I have always found perplexing:
 
Egg Cream -  mixture of seltzer, milk and chocolate syrup (preferably Fox's U-bet) has neither egg or cream in it.  Not sure how it got in the name, they are not particularly creamy and if made correctly should be foamy rather than creamy.
 
Boston Cream Pie - Clearly this is a cake, yet I have always heard it referred to as a pie. 
 
Anyone else have a good example?
 
Back on the topic of Koren BBQ, my Korean neighbor told me that what we call Korean BBQ is referred to by Koreans by a compound word meaning "meat that is roasted."  She informed me that Korean cuisine does employ a "low & slow" technique for some dishes, but that they are not offered at many Korean restautrants.
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    MetroplexJim
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    Re:Korean BBQ & Other Culinary Misnomers 2013/09/07 12:07:06 (permalink)
    This is an interesting exercise in sociolinguistics and regional meanings. 
     
    Growing up near Pittsburgh we always used "barbecue" as an alternative noun, verb, gerund, or adjective for a grill/to grill/grilling/grilled meats - as in "let's go barbecue steaks for dinner".  And, a "barbecue sauce" was something tomato & molassas- based that we slathered on chicken while on the grill or added to our heated chipped, chopped ham.
     
    Only when I moved down South did I realize that it meant (to most) "smoking and cooking over low, indirect heat".
     
    In any case, it's all good.  And I'm happy to be multilingual in my ability to "speak" fluently Pittsburghese, Texan, Virginian, and Carolinian.  My New Yawk and Bahston need a little work, but I seem to get along (and eat well!) when I visit.
    #2
    mar52
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    Re:Korean BBQ & Other Culinary Misnomers 2013/09/07 23:10:06 (permalink)
    Shoofly pie?  Named for what happens rather than what it is.
     
    Dinosaur Ribs
     
     
     
     
    #3
    Foodbme
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    Re:Korean BBQ & Other Culinary Misnomers 2013/09/08 02:36:06 (permalink)
    Elephant Ears -
    Pigs in a Blanket?
    Ants on a Log.
    Butterfingers
    Mary Jane's
    Lady Fingers
    Angel Food Cake
    Angel Hair Pasta
    Yule Logs
    Monkey Bread
     
    post edited by Foodbme - 2013/09/08 02:37:15
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    CCinNJ
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    Re:Korean BBQ & Other Culinary Misnomers 2013/09/08 04:21:56 (permalink)
    Cheesesteak...hamburger & the hot dogs.

    I'm sorry but...a Coney Island that's not on Coney Island in New York City.

    My continued apologies that it's not ice tea...it's iced tea & white chocolate is not chocolate. The jury can also be out at-times in the case of hot chocolate...as well.

    Water ice.


    IT'S-IT. It's what?

    It's-It is an ice cream sandwich hailing from Burlingame California.. The flagship IT'S IT is a scoop of vanilla ice cream sandwiched between two oatmeal cookies... dipped in dark chocolate.
    post edited by CCinNJ - 2013/09/08 04:50:43
    #5
    Mosca
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    Re:Korean BBQ & Other Culinary Misnomers 2013/09/08 08:10:46 (permalink)
    City chicken.
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    Treetop Tom
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    Re:Korean BBQ & Other Culinary Misnomers 2013/09/08 08:37:53 (permalink)
    CCinNJ

    I'm sorry but...a Coney Island that's not on Coney Island in New York City.


    Various regional hot dog references are some of the best examples - I understand a Coney Island Dog is not referred to as such by those in the know on Coney Island (Nathan's menu calls them a chilidog), a New York System dog is found in Rhode Island, and a Michigan Dog (popular in northern New York and Quebec) is unknown in Michigan - they eat coney dogs, from what I read.
    post edited by Treetop Tom - 2013/09/08 09:01:38
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    Michael Hoffman
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    Re:Korean BBQ & Other Culinary Misnomers 2013/09/08 11:30:33 (permalink)
    Sorry folks, but the Coney Island referred to in the Coney Island hot dog happens to be the Coney Island Amusement Park in Cincinnati, Ohio where the Coney island hot dog originated. This Coney Island dates to the 1800s.
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    mar52
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    Re:Korean BBQ & Other Culinary Misnomers 2013/09/08 12:23:07 (permalink)
    Hmmm,  Why do I also think of Detroit (and Vernor's) when I think of Coneys?
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    Michael Hoffman
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    Re:Korean BBQ & Other Culinary Misnomers 2013/09/08 12:27:41 (permalink)
    Beats me. But then I still can't figure out why people like Vernors.
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    MetroplexJim
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    Re:Korean BBQ & Other Culinary Misnomers 2013/09/08 14:07:09 (permalink)
    Sweetbreads.
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    MetroplexJim
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    Re:Korean BBQ & Other Culinary Misnomers 2013/09/08 14:27:55 (permalink)
    Michael Hoffman

    Beats me. But then I still can't figure out why people like Vernors.


    I used to love Vernors - very strong ginger flavor, very fizzy, with a definite aged-in-wood note.  For some reason - maybe my aging taste buds - the 2013 version of Vernors is paler, weaker, less woody, and less fizzy than it was in the '60 - '70' -- that stuff would sting your nose; today, not so.   
    #12
    lleechef
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    Re:Korean BBQ & Other Culinary Misnomers 2013/09/08 17:18:27 (permalink)
    MetroplexJim

    Sweetbreads.

    I once told an American friend that I was making sweetbreads for dinner.  "You're having cinnamon rolls and Danish?!"
    Even more perplexing is the French for sweetbreads:  ris de veau...........which literally means "laugh of veal".  What the heck???
    #13
    Michael Hoffman
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    Re:Korean BBQ & Other Culinary Misnomers 2013/09/08 17:22:36 (permalink)
    Is that anything like a murder of crows?
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    FriedClamFanatic
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    Re:Korean BBQ & Other Culinary Misnomers 2013/09/08 19:05:31 (permalink)
    English Muffins
    French Fries
    Chinese Food (in most American restaurants)
    Dutch Courage
    Canada Geese( ones in my neighborhood haven't seen a maple leaf flag in Generations!)
     
    #15
    Treetop Tom
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    Re:Korean BBQ & Other Culinary Misnomers 2013/09/08 21:26:40 (permalink)
    Michael Hoffman

    Sorry folks, but the Coney Island referred to in the Coney Island hot dog happens to be the Coney Island Amusement Park in Cincinnati, Ohio where the Coney island hot dog originated. This Coney Island dates to the 1800s.

    Even better!  A misconception about a misnomer!

    That's interesting, Michael.  I've heard claims by several "Coney Island" restaurants in Detroit in the early 1900s, but never one by the amusement park in Cincinnati.  It certainly predated the restaurants, opening in 1886 as "Ohio Grove, Coney Island of the West."  Its better known east-coast namesake became a major holiday destination in the 1830s and the first carousel at Coney Island, NY, was built in 1876. 
    post edited by Treetop Tom - 2013/09/08 22:12:08
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    Treetop Tom
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    Re:Korean BBQ & Other Culinary Misnomers 2013/09/08 22:20:51 (permalink)
    Michael Hoffman

    Is that anything like a murder of crows?

    Collective nouns are interesting - a sleuth of bears?  My favorite: A wake of buzzards - perfect description!
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    Glenn1234
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    Re:Korean BBQ & Other Culinary Misnomers 2013/09/09 00:34:37 (permalink)
    CCinNJ

    Cheesesteak...hamburger & the hot dogs.

     
     
    "Hamburger" is actually not much of a misnomer.    It is not derived from "ham burger".   Think of it more as "Hamburg-er".  The name came from the style of ground beef that was popularized in Hamburg, Germany.  Of course, this style of meat, when made into a cooked patty and put on bread to make a sandwich, was first done at Louis' Lunch in New Haven   The term "Hamburger" is just the nickname for the Hamburg-style beef sandwich (Hamburg sandwich). 
     
    Glenn
     
      

    post edited by Glenn1234 - 2013/09/09 00:36:06
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    Foodbme
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    Re:Korean BBQ & Other Culinary Misnomers 2013/09/09 02:14:45 (permalink)
    MetroplexJim
    Sweetbreads.

    And Mountain Oysters!
     
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    Foodbme
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    Re:Korean BBQ & Other Culinary Misnomers 2013/09/09 02:15:08 (permalink)
    Turtles (Candy)
    Black Crows
    post edited by Foodbme - 2013/09/09 02:20:20
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    WarToad
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    Re:Korean BBQ & Other Culinary Misnomers 2013/09/09 08:37:33 (permalink)
    There's an astounding amount of "BBQ Ribs" in chain restaurants that are simply oven baked ribs.  Baked in food factories, vacu-sealed, shipped, then simply warmed and sauced in house.  Nothing remotely "BBQ" about them except a sometimes passable sauce.  Criminal, 100 lashes with wet noodles.
     
    Tin foil.  Made from aluminum.  (Though I think in remote history is was made from tin, but not in ages.)
     
    Head cheese.  Made from meat, no cheese present.
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    MetroplexJim
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    Re:Korean BBQ & Other Culinary Misnomers 2013/09/09 10:38:00 (permalink)
    Foodbme

    MetroplexJim
    Sweetbreads.

    And Mountain Oysters!



    Lamb Fries!!
     
    (That Chevy Chase "Lamb Fries" scene from "Funny Farm" was priceless!)
    #22
    MetroplexJim
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    Re:Korean BBQ & Other Culinary Misnomers 2013/09/09 10:46:00 (permalink)
    Treetop Tom

    Michael Hoffman

    Is that anything like a murder of crows?

    Collective nouns are interesting - a sleuth of bears?  My favorite: A wake of buzzards - perfect description!


    I love it when I learn something new and have a good laugh, too. 
    Thanks! 
    Hilarious!
    #23
    MetroplexJim
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    Re:Korean BBQ & Other Culinary Misnomers 2013/09/09 10:55:30 (permalink)
    WarToad

    There's an astounding amount of "BBQ Ribs" in chain restaurants that are simply oven baked ribs.  Baked in food factories, vacu-sealed, shipped, then simply warmed and sauced in house. 


    Now let's give credit where it is due - I think Applebee's, TGIF's, and Chili's slap them on their grills for a minute or two just to burn in the sauce a little. 
     
    I wonder what Tony Roma's (The Place for Ribs!) does.  Never smelled any smoke around there save for cigarettes back in the day.  The last two of those i visited were truly excreable.
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    felix4067
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    Re:Korean BBQ & Other Culinary Misnomers 2013/09/09 14:36:35 (permalink)
    I've learned all sorts of things about the word "barbecue" in this thread. Where I come from, you can have a barbecue (party held outdoors where you serve grilled food), you can barbecue (cook food on a grill), and you can call anything barbecue that is coated in barbecue sauce. I was not aware until this thread that the only proper way to call something "barbecue" was to cook it low and slow over fire.
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    CCinNJ
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    Re:Korean BBQ & Other Culinary Misnomers 2013/09/09 15:36:23 (permalink)
    Now that I know what a hamburger is ... I can flip the billions and billions of sold sign.
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    mar52
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    Re:Korean BBQ & Other Culinary Misnomers 2013/09/09 15:39:47 (permalink)
    Let us not forget a Rash of Prostitutes.
     
    Back on topic....
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    MetroplexJim
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    Re:Korean BBQ & Other Culinary Misnomers 2013/09/10 12:22:26 (permalink)
    Treetop Tom

    Michael Hoffman

    Sorry folks, but the Coney Island referred to in the Coney Island hot dog happens to be the Coney Island Amusement Park in Cincinnati, Ohio where the Coney island hot dog originated. This Coney Island dates to the 1800s.

    Even better!  A misconception about a misnomer!

    That's interesting, Michael.  I've heard claims by several "Coney Island" restaurants in Detroit in the early 1900s, but never one by the amusement park in Cincinnati.  It certainly predated the restaurants, opening in 1886 as "Ohio Grove, Coney Island of the West."  Its better known east-coast namesake became a major holiday destination in the 1830s and the first carousel at Coney Island, NY, was built in 1876. 


    Yet again I learn something new in this thread.  M&P Coney Island of New Castle, PA, the favorite hot dog place of my youth, is still alive and "dogging it": http://pghfoodgeek.wordpress.com/2013/05/07/mp-coney-island-review/ .
     
    As it is roughly equidistant from NYC and Cincinnati - and as it was begun in the 1920's - I wonder which "Coney Island" is referred to in their name.
     
    The only "hints" I have are the facts that the founders/owners are Greek-Americans and their chili definitely has a note of cinnamon.
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    MetroplexJim
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    Re:Korean BBQ & Other Culinary Misnomers 2013/09/10 12:53:43 (permalink)
    FriedClamFanatic

    Dutch Courage



     
    Had to look it up:  evidently, it means the same as "liquid courage".  And, I guess it makes a little sense from my grandfather's tales of his friendship with the then-retired Honus Wagner.
     
    But, when I think of "Dutch" I am reminded of my favorite Presbyterian minister:
    http://www.b26.com/page/arie.d.bestebreurtje.htm 
     
    Curiously, he never mentioned his former life, but we all knew.
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    FriedClamFanatic
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    Re:Korean BBQ & Other Culinary Misnomers 2013/09/10 17:03:39 (permalink)
    MetroplexJim

    FriedClamFanatic

    Dutch Courage




    Had to look it up:  evidently, it means the same as "liquid courage".  And, I guess it makes a little sense from my grandfather's tales of his friendship with the then-retired Honus Wagner.

    But, when I think of "Dutch" I am reminded of my favorite Presbyterian minister:
    http://www.b26.com/page/arie.d.bestebreurtje.htm 

    Curiously, he never mentioned his former life, but we all knew.


    As with most of these types of Monikers" they have no relation to the truth.  The Dutch have always been a strong, capable nation ( I have 2 children living there).  And....like "Dutch Treat"............another moniker that signifies less in reality the country's habit as a phrase that has come into being
    #30
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