Lesson on Real Wasabi

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Bridgett
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2003/06/19 18:42:42 (permalink)

Lesson on Real Wasabi

I came across this board and was very surpised to see the discussion of wasabi and well as the name of our company Pacific Farms. ALL forms of wasabi on the market regardles of the country they come from are imitiation. Even though the word "wasabi" is on the label it is made from dried american horseradish and large amounts of food coloring. Our product does have a very small amount of food coloring in it because the rhizome oxidizes when exposed to air and turns to a blackish color similar to an avocado.

I do not wish to cause any anger or ruffle feathers, I though this would be a good place to help spread the word about imitation wasabi and help the public learn that they have been dubbed for many years.

To learn more about the true wasabi japonica please check our site at www.freshwasabi.com. There is a trove of information including receipes for the public to use.


#1

23 Replies Related Threads

    Sundancer7
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    RE: Lesson on Real Wasabi 2003/06/19 18:49:34 (permalink)
    I am sorry as I am not an expert on wasabi. All I know is that I use it with my Sushi and it can be toxic if used to excess. I know that experts on this matter will cringe when I say that my homemade Sushi California rolls and other exotic seafoods contain garden variety wasabi bought at Walmart.

    Paul E. Smith
    Knoxville, TN
    #2
    Bridgett
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    RE: Lesson on Real Wasabi 2003/06/19 19:04:44 (permalink)
    I wont tell anyone I promise!! Like all foods when not properly or safely eaten it can be toxic. To be honest I couldn't stand wasabi when I started working here, now I find myself using it on my steaks, with feta cheese and others things. I have tried the powders and other pastes to compair and there is a big difference.

    We stand behind our product and if anyone is completely unhappy we will refund your money and if someone doesn't use credit card we do take checks too.
    #3
    Sundancer7
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    RE: Lesson on Real Wasabi 2003/06/19 19:13:34 (permalink)
    Bridgett, it don't cost all that much. I wish I had a refund on all the experimental food stuff I have bought over the last years. I have thrown out more than I have used. That goes with the territory and I have never ask for my money back with the exception of some jerk who requires me to.

    I will try your product and thanks for your help, although be advised that wasabi ain't one of my daily uses.

    Does it go well with evening libations

    Paul E. Smith
    knoxville, TN
    #4
    meowzart
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    RE: Lesson on Real Wasabi 2003/06/19 20:48:48 (permalink)
    Bridgett,

    I heard a rumor that the Japanese don't really consider any wasabi grown outside of Japan "real" wasabi. (Kind of like "real" champagne only coming from France.) Is that true?

    Meowzart
    #5
    seafarer john
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    RE: Lesson on Real Wasabi 2003/06/19 22:07:25 (permalink)
    A number of years ago I was completely innocent of wasabi. An interesting restaurant, Yobo, in Newburgh, NY serves an eclectic assortment of asian foods, mostly Indonesian, Thai, and Japanese. I ordered some kind of Japanese steak and the waitress suggested wasabi on the side, adding that it was a "spicy" Japanese condiment.
    I said "OK" and smeared a big spoonful of the stuff on my meat - I t was only when I was gasping for breath that I realised a whole lot of people in the room were watching for my first taste of wasabi - they broke out in a mixture of laughs, cheers, applause, and downright mockery . That was my last taste of wasabi - I'll stick to good old american horseradish...
    #6
    Julia I
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    RE: Lesson on Real Wasabi 2003/06/20 00:12:13 (permalink)
    Bridgett,
    I have also read that real (from fresh) wasabi is considerably less sharp and much more savory than the usual stuff that you find here.

    A couple of years ago I was eating out with a friend, who is not fond of spicy foods. We ordered a California roll plate to share. when it arrived I saw various garnishes but not wasabi. I commented on that to my friend, who had never heard of it. I started to try to describe it when I suddenly realized that my friend was turning red and looking a little ill. I asked him what the matter was and he pointed at what he had eaten. I peered over to his side of the plate and said, "Oh, THERE'S the wasabi!" He practically knocked over the waiter running to the restroom to rinse his mouth and I did my best contain my laughter before he returned.

    I'll have to check out the freshwasabi web site.
    #7
    Bridgett
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    RE: Lesson on Real Wasabi 2003/06/20 12:24:48 (permalink)
    Many of the Japanese were astonished that "American's" managed to find the secret of growing wasabi out of it's natural habitat. There were several occurences of "spying" on our farm to learn how we were growing it including fly by's with airplanes and a helicopter. Wasabi is a degree or so milder than horseradish and has a sweeter cleaner aftertaste. It should only be used in very small portions until one is accustom to it's flavor. The typical serving size is 3 grams or 3/4 of a teaspoon.

    #8
    Lone Star
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    RE: Lesson on Real Wasabi 2003/06/20 15:23:15 (permalink)
    Interesting lesson. NOW, if we could just find out the secrets behind Kobe beef.

    Is it true they feed them beer?
    Is it true they massage them with Sake?

    Enquiring minds want to know.
    #9
    CCJPO
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    RE: Lesson on Real Wasabi 2003/06/20 17:18:40 (permalink)
    LONESTAR

    The answers are yes and yes. Although sometimes the cattle are also massaged with milk.
    #10
    yumbo
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    RE: Lesson on Real Wasabi 2003/06/20 19:18:33 (permalink)
    Sorry to be the grump, but I think there needs to be a policy against people pushing their own products on this forum.

    -Yumbo
    #11
    Sundancer7
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    RE: Lesson on Real Wasabi 2003/06/20 19:36:26 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by yumbo

    Sorry to be the grump, but I think there needs to be a policy against people pushing their own products on this forum.

    -Yumbo



    Why not? I appreciate the opportuity to hear about them. If I do not like it, I will not do it. As far as I know, this has been the only individual doing it in the years I have been here, so it is not invasive and quite frankly, I thought the persons thoughts were pretty good.

    I am not a big wasabi fan, but I did learn something from the post.

    This is sort of an educational forum and hopefully we can all profit from the advice, thoughts and experiences from the many folks that visit this site.

    Paul E. Smith
    Knoxville, TN
    #12
    CCJPO
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    RE: Lesson on Real Wasabi 2003/06/20 20:45:30 (permalink)
    I agree with SUNDANCER, why not?

    Does anyone really believe that this site was built for purely altruistic reasons? Do you not believe that the STERN'S do not want people to
    come to this site and then not buy their books, or read their articles, or come to their book signings. Look at the top of the web page what do you see? You see cookbooks for sale. Cookbooks that someone wants sold, so that someone can make a buck. Free enterprise in its purest form. The web is an effective, inexpensive way to reach a large audience for a minimum costs, at least as compared to other forms of advertising. It is all a matter of dollar cost averaging. How can I get the most bang for my buck, or in this case how can a reach the largest number of consumers for the fewest bucks. Historially it has been let's give the JOHN'S something for free and then let's stick em for a bundle. Think Roman BREAD and CIRCUS, medicine men shows, etc. The STERN'S are providing entertainment and information in hopes of creating a market. Nothing wrong with that, more power to them, I hope they make a fortune. It is the American way.

    As to BRIDGETT'S putting her company's website on the board. If you take a look at an entry dated 22April03, somebody with a handle of CCJPO responded to somebody named YUMBO on a CONDIMENT thread about WASABI, in an attempt to provide information to a large audience. CCJPO put out the "freshwasabi" web address for any one who wished to obtain real wasabi. So blame it on me. I have very broad shoulders.

    I would be surprised if other people haven't put their own restuarants or products on the ROADFOOD. If there is information that I don't have, and don't know where to get it I appreciate the input.

    I make and market locally, a kller hot fudge sauce, the best garlic, hot pepper dill pickle you have ever had, and a eggnog at Christmas time that is guaranteed to make one never buy a grocery store brand ever again. These are seasonal products, would not ship well as there are no preservatives added. Well that is not exactly true as the eggnog is quite potent due to the amount and types of booze added, and I have been preserved quite early on a couple of Christmas mornings. If I could market them through ROADFOOD, I'd do it in a heart beat or a New York minute, or lickety split, I'd have a captive audience, presumably with some disposable income, who have an admitted affinity for good food and quality products, and don't mid spending cold hard cash on quality. It is the AMERICAN WAY.
    #13
    yumbo
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    RE: Lesson on Real Wasabi 2003/06/20 21:21:01 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by Sundancer7

    quote:
    Originally posted by yumbo

    Sorry to be the grump, but I think there needs to be a policy against people pushing their own products on this forum.

    -Yumbo



    Why not? I appreciate the opportuity to hear about them. If I do not like it, I will not do it. As far as I know, this has been the only individual doing it in the years I have been here, so it is not invasive and quite frankly, I thought the persons thoughts were pretty good.

    I am not a big wasabi fan, but I did learn something from the post.

    This is sort of an educational forum and hopefully we can all profit from the advice, thoughts and experiences from the many folks that visit this site.

    Paul E. Smith
    Knoxville, TN


    Paul -

    I don't have a problem with the post from Bridgett (or any other of the posts in this thread, for that matter), but I fear that we're on a slippery slope. I am inundated with solicitations for everthing under the sun (phone calls for aluminum siding at dinner time, spam telling me that I need Viagra, etc etc ad nauseum), this is one of the few places where I can be me and not worry about someone I trust (i.e., the Sterns) adding my email to some list. I'm not internet savvy enough to know if the email addresses on this forum can be harvested by some commercial group (is it?).

    My response is more to a percieved threat or fear than Bridgett's post about wasabi.

    Respectfully,

    Yumbo
    #14
    yumbo
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    RE: Lesson on Real Wasabi 2003/06/20 21:32:02 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by CCJPO

    I agree with SUNDANCER, why not?

    Does anyone really believe that this site was built for purely altruistic reasons? Do you not believe that the STERN'S do not want people to
    come to this site and then not buy their books, or read their articles, or come to their book signings. Look at the top of the web page what do you see? You see cookbooks for sale. Cookbooks that someone wants sold, so that someone can make a buck. Free enterprise in its purest form. The web is an effective, inexpensive way to reach a large audience for a minimum costs, at least as compared to other forms of advertising. It is all a matter of dollar cost averaging. How can I get the most bang for my buck, or in this case how can a reach the largest number of consumers for the fewest bucks. Historially it has been let's give the JOHN'S something for free and then let's stick em for a bundle. Think Roman BREAD and CIRCUS, medicine men shows, etc. The STERN'S are providing entertainment and information in hopes of creating a market. Nothing wrong with that, more power to them, I hope they make a fortune. It is the American way.

    As to BRIDGETT'S putting her company's website on the board. If you take a look at an entry dated 22April03, somebody with a handle of CCJPO responded to somebody named YUMBO on a CONDIMENT thread about WASABI, in an attempt to provide information to a large audience. CCJPO put out the "freshwasabi" web address for any one who wished to obtain real wasabi. So blame it on me. I have very broad shoulders.

    I would be surprised if other people haven't put their own restuarants or products on the ROADFOOD. If there is information that I don't have, and don't know where to get it I appreciate the input.

    I make and market locally, a kller hot fudge sauce, the best garlic, hot pepper dill pickle you have ever had, and a eggnog at Christmas time that is guaranteed to make one never buy a grocery store brand ever again. These are seasonal products, would not ship well as there are no preservatives added. Well that is not exactly true as the eggnog is quite potent due to the amount and types of booze added, and I have been preserved quite early on a couple of Christmas mornings. If I could market them through ROADFOOD, I'd do it in a heart beat or a New York minute, or lickety split, I'd have a captive audience, presumably with some disposable income, who have an admitted affinity for good food and quality products, and don't mid spending cold hard cash on quality. It is the AMERICAN WAY.


    Hi CCPJO -

    Please see my response to Paul. This discussion is starting to move into the political/idealogical realm, which is a place that I'd rather not go. I'd rather stick to food.

    -Yumbo
    #15
    tvaleri
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    RE: Lesson on Real Wasabi 2003/06/20 22:48:41 (permalink)
    HOWEVER , back to wasabi.

    Bridgette, It had been my understanding that the powdered wasabi was a mix of horseradish (European? Norway?) and hot mustard (ie: the type found at chinese restraunts). I've never had 'real' wasabi root, but I enjoy the common stuff on a wide range of food.
    #16
    tvaleri
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    RE: Lesson on Real Wasabi 2003/06/20 22:54:00 (permalink)
    -- oops. the [tab] key doesn't do what I expected

    Anyway, can you tell us any more about the 'common' form of wasabi? and how does the real root compare in flavour. Can you cook with it? Or is it's use limited to being freshly grated and served as a condiment?

    Take Care
    Tony
    #17
    CCJPO
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    RE: Lesson on Real Wasabi 2003/06/21 00:56:37 (permalink)
    How cool is this? A let's make the bladder gladder contest. Either say what you mean or mean what you say. YUMBO, your post in question spoke directly about people shilling for their own products or company. It did not address any of the concerns in your follow up
    posts as to being bombarded by unsolicited offers either telephonically or webly.

    As to any concerns as to the sanctity or security of the site, any savvy 16 year hacker wannabe can find a back door and/or break through any number of firewalls and scarf out information on the net. It is the nature of the information age. Any security system is obsolete about 2 minutes after it is developed and implented. People relish the challenge and if they can cut the mustard they will crack a system, then they just hope that someone doesn't ketchup to them and put them on ice.

    I won't steak my bacon on it, but I guess I am going to get
    skewered for my hotdogging on this site. Or at the very least get my rump roasted on a barbeque. But it has been a gas. ENJOY
    #18
    yumbo
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    RE: Lesson on Real Wasabi 2003/06/21 11:02:20 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by CCJPO

    How cool is this? A let's make the bladder gladder contest. Either say what you mean or mean what you say. YUMBO, your post in question spoke directly about people shilling for their own products or company. It did not address any of the concerns in your follow up
    posts as to being bombarded by unsolicited offers either telephonically or webly.
    <snip>


    Bridgett's email was precedent setting because it was the first "commercial" email that I've seen on this forum. It was a soft sell or no sell, but commercial nonetheless. And so I am left wondering if there is a policy around people selling their products here. It's a slippery slope between Bridgett's post and exploitation of this forum. I'm inundated with people trying to sell me stuff, and I'd hate to see it start here.

    I would also hate to see restauranteurs start pushing their own places on Roadfood, or signing up 30 of their friends to the Roadfood forum to talk about what a wonderful place they have.

    As for your comments on the American Way, I don't have a problem with business owners using all means necessary to get ahead. But sometimes unfettered commerce leads to exploitation. Go read Fast Food Nation or Upton Sinclair.
    #19
    CCJPO
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    RE: Lesson on Real Wasabi 2003/06/21 14:44:08 (permalink)
    I love this, verbal vomiting at its finest. Being on the north side of 50 I am quite familiar with Upton Sinclair and the slaughter house industry. Lived in Chicago as a youngin and worked in a slaughter house in my teens in Ohio, and currently slaughter my own cattle, sheep and chickens, and any game meat or fish I hunt or catch for home consumption, did one a horse once, not mine one year, was feeling very French. It didn't taste like chicken, nor snake. It had more of an elk or moose taste and consistency Won't talk about monkeys, and rats and little tiny deer, others can if they wish I wouldn't eat a hotdog or bologna for years. I do now. What we forgot can't hurt us.

    The other side of Upton Sinclair would be Ayn Rand. Give it another read.

    As to the use of this site for commercial purposes, I reiterate, do you honestly believe that the STERNS built this site for we the consumer for any other reason then to ultimately get us to consume. Certainly they want to entertain and inform, and to allow us to broaden our experiences and horizons, but they also want us to use and consume their products. What a perfect gimmick, I'm proud of them, they have a great method for getting their message out in a fun informative way. While I don't know what their sales figures are since the forum was created I would hazard a guess that they have increased. However that is their business not mine, unless of course they were a publicly held company and I owned shares in the company.

    So in closing beware BIG BROTHER is watching, Farenheit 451 may not be a book you want to have in your house, that is if your house is made of straw or other flammable material. And is Soylent Green something we should worry about. ENJOY
    #20
    Sundancer7
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    RE: Lesson on Real Wasabi 2003/06/21 14:54:20 (permalink)
    I genuinely believe Michael Stern and Rushmore does this as a labor of love. I have yet to see a commercial except for the sale of a cook book or two. It ain't like they are getting rich off the sale of some books.

    If I were them, I would take it commercial. They have enough readers that are focused on just a few subjects.

    I personally do not see how they can afford to do it like they do!

    Paul E. Smith
    Knoxville, TN
    #21
    Stephen Rushmore Jr.
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    RE: Lesson on Real Wasabi 2003/06/22 18:17:56 (permalink)
    Let me make a couple points here:

    #1. Owners do occasionally submit reviews to Roadfood.com. That is why I approve everything that gets posted to the review section of the site. I like to believe I am 99% effective in removing the garbage (it is generally easy to spot)

    #2. Roadfood.com is a labor of love for Jane, Michael and I. I put in thousands of hours here because I enjoy being surrounded by millions of other people who all share a similar passion. It's that formula that will make us survive much longer then the other dot coms you have heard of.

    #3. We try to filter out as much of the commercializing on the forums. Things slip through my scan, but the active posters keep us on top of things.
    #22
    Sundancer7
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    RE: Lesson on Real Wasabi 2003/06/22 18:32:19 (permalink)
    I am aware of what you are referring to however, I did not believe the individual was trying to commercially trying to enter the forum. The individual was trying to educate those of us who were not familar with wasabi.

    I believe some are oversensitive and I appreciate those who help us that are not familiar with all that help us do better.

    Roadfood Staff, thanks for your help

    Paul E. Smith
    Knoxville, TN
    #23
    Bridgett
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    RE: Lesson on Real Wasabi 2003/06/23 13:19:20 (permalink)
    First and formost my initial post on this site was NOT to push a sale or to irritate those who oppose "commercial" posts. I was just trying to "educate" individuals who obviously have a love for food, on wasabi. As far as the political scope that my post's have obviously taken I will no longer be a partcipant at this site. I did not know that by helping people learn about a subject was "commercial" in anyway nor anymore an oddity than some what people have in their refrigerators.. Again I apologize for causing any unrest on this board. For those that wish contace me I'm available at bridge@freshwasabi.com.

    Sincerely,

    Bridgett
    #24
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