Hot!Let's see the recipes - here is mine

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Zythos
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2003/07/15 04:38:14 (permalink)

Let's see the recipes - here is mine

This thread has a lot of good information and receipes in it. I decided to make it a "Sticky" so that it is easily found. Please add your chili receipes as you come across them. MikeS.


I found the "Without....It Ain't Real Chili" thread interesting. Now, I would be curious to see if anyone has a recipe they are willing to share reflecting that passion.

I submit my midwest-style eclectic chili recipe.

Crazy Ed's Holiday Chili

white onions - chopped 4 lg.
extra virgin olive oil 1 Tbsp.
ground round 4 1/2 lb.
garlic cloves - pressed 5
tomato paste - Italian 8 oz.

water - boiling 2 c.
chipolte peppers 3 lg.
ancho chilies 2 oz.
habanero peppers (hot) to taste

tomato soup 10 3/4 oz.
tomato sauce 8 oz.
Boulevard Bully! Porter 24 oz. (dark beer)
diced tomatoes 2 - 16 oz.
beef consume 10 3/4 oz.
crushed tomatoes 2 - 16 oz.
fresh mushrooms - sliced 8 oz.
dark red kidney beans 4 - 16 oz.
celery rib/head - chopped 4
green pepper - chopped 1 lg.
black olives - chopped 4 1/4 oz.

Worcestershire sauce 2 tsp.
balsamic vinegar 2 Tbsp.
honey 3 Tbsp.
liquid smoke 1/4 tsp.

ground cinnamon 1/4 tsp.
ground red pepper 1/8 tsp.
ground cloves 1/8 tsp.
ground allspice 1/8 tsp.
corn flour (masa) 3 Tbsp. (processed cornmeal)
cocoa - Dutch processed 1 Tbsp.
black pepper (coarse) 3/4 tsp.
bay leaves - whole 3
paprika 1 tsp.
salt 1 Tbsp.
Mexican oregano 1 tsp.
ground cumin 1 tsp.
dry parsley 1 tsp.
dry cilantro 1 tsp.
dry mustard 1 tsp.

1. Using a large skillet cook the onions in half of the olive oil until nearly translucent. Add the garlic to the skillet and cook for 1 more minute. Place the onions in a large stock pot (12 quart). Brown the meat in the remaining oil. Add the tomato paste to the meat during the last few minutes of browning. Add this to the stock pot without draining.

2. Remove the seeds, veins, and stems from the chipoltes, habaneros, and anchos. Tear the chilies into small pieces and soak them in the hot water for 30 minutes. Puree the chilies and water in a blender until a paste forms. Add this paste to the stock pot and mix well.

3. Add all of the liquid ingredients and vegetables, except for the spices, to the stock pot and bring them to a simmer. Do not drain any of the canned items.

4. Mix the Worcestershire sauce, vinegar, honey, and liquid smoke in a small dish until the honey is dissolved. Add this mixture to the stock pot and stir well.

5. Add all of the dry spices together in a small bowl and mix well. Add this spice mixture to the stock pot slowly, a little at a time. Once all the ingredients are mixed together, return the chili to a simmer. Simmer the chili for 2-3 hours uncovered. Remember to stir the chili occasionally and add water or beer if necessary. Makes about 10 quarts (leftovers freeze well). The chili should be allowed to age 1-2 days in the refrigerator. Serve the chili over rice or pasta Midwest-style and add your favorite condiments. Serve the chili with a salad and your favorite beer and you will have a feast. Cheese biscuits and cornbread are also wonderful with this recipe.

The ingredients in steps 4 and 5 can be prepared the day ahead to save time and to avoid any last second measuring mistakes. Just place them in sealed containers or Ziploc bags and place in the refrigerator until the next day.

This recipe has won its share of awards. However, my greatest pleasure comes in sharing a great meal with friends and family. It seems everyone always goes crazy over this recipe. It may seem a bit unusual but it is unusually good.

Ed Sizemore

#1

143 Replies Related Threads

    Tommy B
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    RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine 2003/07/15 05:48:11 (permalink)
    Ed, just want to say thank you for taking the time to write out this recipe. It looks fabulous !
    I have a recipe, and will post it soon. I have to dig it up. thanks so much for sharing.

    1 - 1 1/2 lbs of hot italian sausage
    1 - 1 1/2 lbs of ground beef
    1 large onion
    4 cans of pink beans
    1 29oz can Crushed tomatoes
    2 packets Old El Paso Chili seasoning
    1 bottle of beer

    Chop onion and saute till translucent. remove skin from sausage, break up and add to pot. In separate pan, brown and drain the ground beef. Add to the sausage pot. Add remaining ingredients, stir thoroughly. Bring to a boil, then simmer and let cook down for 30 minutes. You're ready to go! (I prefer it the next day!)
    #2
    RubyRose
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    RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine 2003/07/15 07:01:46 (permalink)
    Ed, your chili recipe sound wonderful.
    #3
    Sundancer7
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    RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine 2003/07/15 19:02:07 (permalink)
    Zythos: You should win a prize for the most ingredients for chili or perhaps anything else. I read Gone with the Wind and it was shorter

    Sounds good if my old age will allow me to remember what you wrote.

    Paul E. Smith
    Knoxville, TN
    #4
    EliseT
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    RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine 2003/07/15 20:23:41 (permalink)
    I once made a "Cowboy Chili" that was of similar length. I went around the kitchen and threw in everything I thought a cowboy would like: coffee, beer, tequila, etc.

    My recipe is pretty simple, but tried and true. That Schilling chili mix in a bright red and orange envelope (not a jar) makes anything taste great. I have tried my own spices out of pride, and must admit nothing beats that stuff. If I happen to have fresh chiles, serrano or jalapeno, I dice one and add it to the pot.

    2 pounds ground beef

    Gebhardt's chili powder (1-2 Tbsp)

    1 medium red onion

    1/2 each red and green pepper

    1 tall can kidney beans, drained

    1 short can chili or pinto beans

    1 large can chopped peeled tomatoes

    1/2 can Campbell's tomato soup or small can tomato sauce

    1 cup beer or beef broth

    1 envelope Schilling chili mix

    Cayenne pepper and ground Pasilla chile to taste

    Sprinkle meat with Gebhardt's and brown meat in large frying pan. Put beef into large stockpot.

    Dice onion and peppers. Fry and add to stockpot. Add the rest of the ingredients and cook, stirring, over a low heat for as long as you can stand it.
    #5
    Sundancer7
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    RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine 2003/07/21 20:49:02 (permalink)
    Elise: How do you remember all these exact recipe's.

    I wish I were that good. I sorta guess at what I do and some of the time, it come out good,actually most of the time, but I never am exact as you do.

    Paul E. Smith
    Knoxville, TN
    #6
    EdSails
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    RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine 2003/07/21 20:56:27 (permalink)
    Paul-----I'm like you------some times I win and sometimes I lose at it. I think one of the most frustrating things that ever happened to me was creating a dish (it was some sort of pork cutlet with a raspberry sauce) that all my guest went crazy over. I had 3 requests for the recipe---------to which I replied...... "well, um......I just kept adding things until I thought it was tasted good......". I've never been able to duplicate that recipe or a lot of others that just came about. My hat's off too to all those who can write them down and remeber them!
    #7
    EliseT
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    RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine 2003/07/21 23:42:13 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by Sundancer7

    Elise: How do you remember all these exact recipe's.

    I wish I were that good. I sorta guess at what I do and some of the time, it come out good,actually most of the time, but I never am exact as you do.

    Paul E. Smith
    Knoxville, TN


    Short answer for the easily bored: I always write my recipes down

    Long answer for the more inquisitive:

    One year I was REALLY broke at Xmas. I saw an artist talk about how she made clip art calendars for cheap gifts. I collected a bunch of family "comfort food" recipes, typed them up, and decorated them with insanely grinning housewives from 40s and 50s magazines. I got the Xerox shop to copy, collate and bind them. Thus, "MOM FOOD" was born.

    I made one every year for 9 years. The 10th was to be a "best of" but I'm waiting for computer technology (affordable technology) to catch up so I can just scan the old cookbooks and mess with them to standardize fonts, fix typos and change art and stuff. Imagine my chagrin when I got the Stern's "American Gourmet" and saw they did something similar (even some of the pictures are the same!).

    Anyways, I do have a point...my point is, alot of these recipes I can just look up in one of my MOM FOODs. Also, many older family members and friends are of the, "Oh, I don't use recipes...I don't measure anything" ilk. So when I want one of their specialties, I ask them to let me watch, pen and paper in hand. I can tell a quarter cup from a half cup by sight now. So even something like my chili, which I don't use a recipe for, I can pretty easily guage.
    #8
    Adjudicator
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    RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine 2003/07/22 10:48:22 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by Sundancer7

    Zythos: You should win a prize for the most ingredients for chili or perhaps anything else. I read Gone with the Wind and it was shorter

    Sounds good if my old age will allow me to remember what you wrote.

    Paul E. Smith
    Knoxville, TN


    Either that or he was cleaning out the 'fridge & spice cabinet...
    #9
    rumtussle
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    RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine 2003/07/25 04:04:24 (permalink)
    Chili is our weekly staple. My partner makes up a huge batch every Sunday, then carries it to work throughout the week while the kids and I snack on the leftovers occasionally. He makes it a little bit different every week, but it's always delicious. He experiments with different meats (there is an Exotic Meats store across the street from his office building), so he's made it with ostrich and buffalo, but my favorite is with grass-fed beef. It has a slightly stronger "beefier" flavor than grain-fed beef, but it doesn't have that subtle gamey taste that buffalo does. The other thing I like about the way he makes chili is that he always puts in tons of vegetables. Lately, he's been putting in several pounds of baby squash, adolescent carrots, and cauliflower in with the onions and garlic and chili powder and whatnot. He's been using french lentils as the bean lately too, and that changes the texture some. I swear he makes the best chili I've ever tasted, and even as carried away as he gets with the vegetables, it still ends up tasting like chili.

    Rumty
    #10
    serusaert
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    RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine 2003/07/28 01:58:21 (permalink)
    I thought I would post the recipe that Rumtussle mentioned, especially cause she got some of it sora wrong:

    1 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
    1 lb ground beef (grass-fed, no grain)
    2 onions (sweet is OK)
    2 medium carrots, diced
    handfull green beans, diced (or cauliflower florets, separated - small)
    handfull baby zuchini or 2 medium sized, diced
    4 cloves garlic
    7 fresh ground allspice berries
    1 tsp whole corriander, fresh ground
    2 tbsp paprika
    1 tbsp rio grand chile powder
    1/2 can muir glen pizza sauce
    1 big can muir glen chunky tomato sauce
    1 can lentils (I use the "Heirloom Bean" black beluga lentils)

    In big cast iron pot, saute the onions in oil until sorta soft, add carrots, saute for few minutes, add green beans, saute 5 mins, add zuchini. When zuchini is sorta soft, push everything to side and add beef. Beef will cook fast cause it has less fat (being grass-fed). Salt beef as you stir it up so it breaks up into very small pieces. When beef is done (don't over cook - it cooks like buffalo), add spices and garlic, stir, turn off heat, let sit for a minute or two (everything sorta get to know each other a bit) add tomatoe sauce and pizza sauce and simmer for a few minutes. Add lentils and simmer just a bit.

    That's it. This is just sorta a basic recipe. I don't stick to it, myself. Cause it has vegies and uses beef with a better fat profile, I feel better eating it. Cause the beef is grass-fed, it has a very beefy taste. Grain-fed beef is more mild and has more fat and more cholesterol.


    #11
    MikeS.
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    RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine 2003/08/18 01:36:57 (permalink)
    Ok, so here is my favorite chili receipe

    3 cans Ranch style Texas beans, about 15 ozs each.
    2 cans Rotel chopped tomatoes and peppers
    2 cans sliced stewed tomatoes that I then chunk
    1 can tomato sauce with 1 in reserve (15oz?)
    1 can hot enchilada sauce
    1 lg vidalia onion, chopped large. Somrtimes 1 1/2 onions...
    2 - 3 lbs ground beef.
    salt & pepper & McCormick chili powder to taste
    1 lg heapin spoon full of store bought chopped garlic (2 T?)
    a little vegetable oil

    I pour in enough oil to lightly coat a lg skillet and throw in the chopped onion to saute for about 4 minutes. I then add in the hamburger and S&P & chili powder to taste. Cook and stir for about 4 minutes and then add in the garlic. Cook and stir another 2 or 3 minutes.

    Using a large wok looking skillet I pour in all the canned stuff, not drained and then add in the ground beef. If it isn't juicy enough I will add in the 2nd can of tomato sauce. I'm not loking for soup though. I will simmer for about an hour, stirring occasionally and then will taste test. I'll add more S, P or chili powder as desired. It'll simmer about another hr.

    Served with cornbread and beer. My beer of choice? Either Rolling Rock, Yuengling or Wursteiner's Dunkel.

    I add Cholula hot sauce to taste in my bowl.

    I love this stuff the next few days reheated, drain off the juice and put into a warmed flour tortillia with cheese and rolled into a burrito.
    #12
    Penoose
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    RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine 2003/12/01 03:31:10 (permalink)
    Hey Ed -

    I'm giving your chili a try...it looks fantastic. A few questions:

    >>diced tomatoes 2 - 16 oz.
    crushed tomatoes 2 - 16 oz.
    dark red kidney beans 4 - 16 oz.<<

    I am assuming the numbers before the hyphens refer to the number of cans, i.e. four 16 oz. cans of dark red kidney beans?

    Also, out of curiosity, what is the advantage of using both diced AND crushed tomatoes, both tomato sauce AND tomato soup?

    Finally, have you tried this recipe with anything besides ground beef?

    Thanks.

    P.j.

    #13
    Zythos
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    RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine 2004/01/03 00:45:01 (permalink)
    Your assumption is correct. The number before the hypen indicates the number of items to be used.

    I am not sure the advantage of the numerous tomato combinations, it was just the way the recipe developed over time. It worked, so I have stuck with it. I suppose the same volume of crushed or stewed toms would work just as well considering the length of the cooking time. I often use the newer tomato inventions such as "Italian-Style" which have added spices.

    I am glad you asked about other meat ingredients! I love to make it with venison (deer) as I am am an avid hunter. With the complex spices, the crowd does not even know it is not beef. And it is higher in protein and lower in fat. Most wonderful!

    I made this for the big family gathering again this Christmas! I had about 11 quarts ready for the masses. We saved much time fighting for a good dinner/lunch spot in Kansas City on several days of our shared vacation. All enjoyed. Even the kids, as reserved about food as they can be, love it with tortilla chips.

    I would note that I used small portabella mushrooms in this last batch. They hold up better to the long cooking time and they have a wonderful flavor and texture of their own. But, standard "white" or canned shrooms work well if you are trying to be sneaky. Some get offended when they see mushrooms in chili. How could you? :)

    I also have increased the green pepper by one for a total of two really large bell peppers. This is more of textural and visual thing.

    I hope it turned out well for you. It is always a winner for me.


    #14
    Penoose
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    RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine 2004/01/03 14:06:05 (permalink)
    The chili was excellent, Ed. Very flavorful.

    I made some minor modifications (more garlic, dried New Mexican reds with the anchos and chipotles, Bell's Porter, more worcestershire and slightly less tomato sauce). I also had to sneak in the olives, celery, and mushrooms, so as not to offend purists.

    I imagine it would be equally tasty with venison. Great stuff.

    Thanks!
    #15
    hungovergourmet
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    RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine 2004/01/31 23:52:06 (permalink)
    Here's one of my favorite chili recipes, great for a day when you want to put it in the crock pot and let it cook all day. Has its roots back in my wilder days, hence the name...

    Hungover Chili — a slow-cooker brew for the day after

    1 lb. bulk sweet Italian sausage
    1 lb. lean ground beef
    2 med. onions
    1 (28 oz.) can whole tomatoes
    1 (15 oz.) can tomato sauce
    1 tsp. sugar
    2 tsps. chili powder
    2 tsps. ground cumin
    2 tsps. dried oregano
    2 (15 oz.) cans chili beans
    1 (15 oz.) can chick peas
    3 cloves minced garlic
    1 tbsp. olive oil

    Heat olive oil in a large skillet. When oil is hot — but not smoking — add one chopped onion and the garlic. Saute until onion is translucent. Add ground beef and Italian sausage. Brown.

    While meat, onions and garlic are cooking, combine one quartered onion and remaining ingredients in 3.5 or 4 quart slow cooker.

    When meat is finished browning, drain with a slotted spoon and transfer to slow cooker. Cover and cook on low setting for 7–8 hours. While chili cooks, apply favorite hangover remedies, watch tv and rehydrate. When time is up, you should be cured and the chili is ready to be garnished and served as desired.
    #16
    roossy90
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    RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine 2005/08/28 20:27:33 (permalink)
    Ok,
    I had to stick my 2 cents in here.
    This is just the basics-you can make however large or small serving you like...
    I am like many and just add dashes and guestimates of seasonings...
    This isnt rocket science.. a little of this and that....
    But the basic ingredients are:
    Pork tenderloin, coated with garlic powder, or fresh rub--cooked and then put in the food processor and added after all the rest of the ingredients.
    Ground Chuck... put in pan without crubling it up, so it still has large chunks when mixed with the rest.
    2 cansMexican stewed tomato's
    Diced tomato's
    tomato paste
    cumin- i like lots of cumin in mine.
    chili powder
    Large chunks white onion.. the more it makes you cry the better
    Large chunks green bell pepper
    can of hot rotelle tomato & green chilis
    ( if you want it hotter, a small can of hot green chilis also)
    dash of cayenne pepper
    salt and pepper to taste
    2 tablespoons of cinamon sugar... (wow)-- thats the kicker flavor-or more or less to taste...
    half bunch cilantro
    1 can dark red kidney beans
    1 can chili beans
    1/2 bottle of any (except flavored) micro brew beer
    Try it, the pork should be processed so that there are still bite sized chucks so you can taste the pork flavor.. and it will be white, makes for a nice looking chili..
    I usually like to cook mine for several hours on LOW...and eat it the next day after cooling and re-heating..
    Wow.. now I have to go make some....
    Let me know how ya like it!

    tara
    #17
    Adjudicator
    Sirloin
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    RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine 2005/08/28 20:50:26 (permalink)
    Repost:

    "It Ain't Chili And It Ain't Beans"


    8 (16oz.) cans pork & beans
    4 (16 oz.) cans dark red kidney beans
    2 large yellow onions
    1 stalk celery
    2 large bell peppers
    4 oz. jalapeno relish
    1 1/2 oz. cayenne pepper
    1 1/2 oz. black pepper
    1 Tbsp. Salt
    1 oz. liquid smoke flavoring
    2 lb. ground sirloin
    2 lb. Hillshire Farms beef sausage
    1 lb. sharp cheddar cheese
    1 lb. Mozzarella cheese
    2 pkg. McCormick chili mix

    Open the cans of beans and pour contents into a three gallon pot. Place pot on stove over low heat. Add chili mix, liquid smoke flavoring, salt, black pepper, cayenne pepper, and jalapeno relish. Stir contents thoroughly. Coarse chop/cut all cheeses and add to pot. Coarse chop/cut onions, celery, and bell pepper; set aside.

    Precook sausage for 4 minutes on HIGH setting in microwave (optional). Cut sausage into small bite-sized pieces, then fry in skillet until done. Drain all grease and add sausage to pot. Fry ground sirloin; drain all grease and add to pot. Add onions, celery, and bell peppers to pot; stir thoroughly. Cover pot. Increase heat slightly to bring contents almost to a boil, then cook for 15-20 minutes while stirring contents often.

    This recipe freezes well. Any leftovers can be placed in plastic containers and frozen for eating later.

    Note: Beans tend to get hotter over a period of time.

    #18
    porkbeaks
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    RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine 2005/08/29 14:25:37 (permalink)
    When I'm asked to make a pot of my chili, this is what they want. Nothing too unusual, but it's real tasty. If I make a hotter version, I use some Rotel tomatoes and/or a small can of chilpotle peppers in adobo sauce.

    Pork and Black Bean Chili

    2 - 15 oz. cans Black Beans
    2 - Pork Tenderloins (about 2 lbs) trimmed and cubed
    5 Garlic Cloves -- minced
    1½ Tbs. Paprika
    3 tsp. Cumin -- ground
    1 28 oz. can chopped tomatoes
    3 Tbs. Red Wine Vinegar
    ½ cup chopped Parsley
    ½ tsp. Black Pepper -- freshly ground
    2 Tbsp. olive oil
    2 large onions, chopped
    1½ Tbsp. Chili Powder
    2 tsp. dried Oregano
    ½ tsp. Chili Pepper Flakes
    2 cups Chicken stock
    3 Green/Red/Yellow Peppers -- diced
    Salt to taste
    Heat oil in a large saucepan on high heat and brown meat cubes on all sides. Remove from pan and set aside. Add peppers, onions, and garlic to pan; cook on medium heat until tender about 5 minutes. Add chili powder, paprika, oregano, cumin and chili pepper flakes; cook, stirring for 1 minute. Return meat to pan along with tomatoes, including juice, stock and vinegar. Bring to boil, let simmer, partly covered, for 1 1/2 hours or until meat is tender. Add beans and season with salt and pepper. Cover and cook 15 minutes more. Add chopped parsley and serve topped with diced Vidalia onions and grated Colby/Jack cheese.
    #19
    roossy90
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    RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine 2005/09/09 22:01:49 (permalink)
    Uh Duh..
    When I entered my recipe, I forgot to add after rubbing the pork tenderloin with garlic, "cook it in the oven and then after cooling", put it in the food processor..

    I got so carried away with listing my ingredients....Sorry for any confusion..
    Tara
    #20
    Mosca
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    RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine 2005/09/09 22:58:42 (permalink)
    I usually make it up as I go along. Here are some of my personal touches:

    1) I cook the meat and the veggies on the grill.
    2) I always use cast iron.
    3) I use a mixture of different peppers, and I grind my own powder.
    4) If I use beans, I use a mixture of different kinds; black, anasazi, pinto, whatever.
    5) Sometimes I use an off beat vegetable, maybe some corn, or some olives, or a little celery.

    But like I said, I decide how I'm going to make it as I walk around the grocery.


    Tom


    #21
    TxConnie
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    RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine 2005/09/10 12:53:03 (permalink)
    Okay-- I cheat. I only make Chili with Wick Fowler's 2-Alarm Chili mix and add extra cayenne pepper. Meat varies- but I think Venison is the best.
    #22
    dreamzpainter
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    RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine 2005/09/11 11:47:59 (permalink)
    like many have mentioned I dont use recipes, I remember the basics and go from there.. chili starts with onions/bell and hot peppers/garlic, hamburger/hot sausage,packaged chili seasoning, sometimes taco seasoning, rotelle is a pantry staple as are crushed tomatoes, jarred spagetti sauce varies with kind of flavoring(basil and herb etc) a couple healthy glugs of red wine join the other ingredients in the crockpot
    #23
    senor boogie woogie
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    RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine 2005/10/06 13:04:17 (permalink)

    When I lived in America, I made Chili but it was pretty basic made by millions of people:

    Ground hamburger
    Tomato Sauce (canned or make your own)
    Red Kidney Beans
    Old El Paso Chili Powder.
    Capiscum (bell pepper) either green, yellow or fire red.
    Onion, and lots of it!

    1.)Cut the onion very fine.
    2.)Brown the hamburger. Put one packet of chili powder while cooking.
    3.)Put the onions in when the meat starts to brown up.
    4.)Throw in the tomato sauce and the peppers.
    5.)Mix it all up, get it hot in the pot.

    Bam! Chili. From start to finish about 30 minutes depending on how much chili you want to cook, and if you are one of those anal retentive people who has to make their own sauce because Hunt's in a can is beneath you. Granted, my simple recipe would get me laughed out of Texas, but everyone who has ever had it, likes/loves it.

    The only time I screwed up my Chili was when I used turkey hamburger instead of beef. Turkey hamburger is too lean and lacks the fat content of beef. As Julia Child once noted "Fat brings flavor." Chili makes you fart too, which is a disadvantage to eating it.

    Senor

    #24
    tiki
    Filet Mignon
    • Total Posts : 4140
    • Joined: 2003/07/07 18:31:00
    • Location: Rentiesville, OK
    • Status: offline
    RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine 2005/10/06 16:02:48 (permalink)
    Ive posted this before--but Bushie says its the real deal and i like it too.


    Texas Red

    2 tablespoons vegetable oil
    2 large onions, coarsely chopped
    5 cloves garlic, crushed
    2 pounds lean boneless beef, cut into 1/2-inch cubes (2 to 2 1/2)
    3 tablespoons chili powder
    1 tablespoon paprika
    1 teaspoon crushed dried hot peppers
    2 teaspoons cumin
    2 teaspoons Mexican oregano
    1 cup hot water
    1 teaspoon salt
    1 tablespoon Masa Harina (1 to 2)
    1. In a large Dutch oven heat the oil over medium heat. Add the onions and garlic and sauté until very lightly browned.

    2. Add the beef cubes in several batches and brown on all sides. When all the beef is browned, add all remaining ingredients except the Masa Harina®. Bring to a simmer, then cover and cook over low heat for 3 to 4 hours until the meat is very tender. If too much of the liquid cooks away, add some more hot water during the cooking. Adjust salt and chili powder, adding more to taste if desired.

    3. To thicken the chili, mix the Masa Harina® with a little cold water, then add this to the chili while it is still simmering. Cook the chili 10 to 15 minutes longer.

    4. Serve the chili in bowls with saltines and cooked pinto beans on the side.
    #25
    Michael Hoffman
    Double-chop Porterhouse
    • Total Posts : 18700
    • Joined: 2000/07/01 08:52:00
    • Location: Gahanna, OH
    • Status: offline
    RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine 2005/10/06 17:03:59 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by tiki

    Ive posted this before--but Bushie says its the real deal and i like it too.


    Texas Red

    2 tablespoons vegetable oil
    2 large onions, coarsely chopped
    5 cloves garlic, crushed
    2 pounds lean boneless beef, cut into 1/2-inch cubes (2 to 2 1/2)
    3 tablespoons chili powder
    1 tablespoon paprika
    1 teaspoon crushed dried hot peppers
    2 teaspoons cumin
    2 teaspoons Mexican oregano
    1 cup hot water
    1 teaspoon salt
    1 tablespoon Masa Harina (1 to 2)
    1. In a large Dutch oven heat the oil over medium heat. Add the onions and garlic and sauté until very lightly browned.

    2. Add the beef cubes in several batches and brown on all sides. When all the beef is browned, add all remaining ingredients except the Masa Harina®. Bring to a simmer, then cover and cook over low heat for 3 to 4 hours until the meat is very tender. If too much of the liquid cooks away, add some more hot water during the cooking. Adjust salt and chili powder, adding more to taste if desired.

    3. To thicken the chili, mix the Masa Harina® with a little cold water, then add this to the chili while it is still simmering. Cook the chili 10 to 15 minutes longer.

    4. Serve the chili in bowls with saltines and cooked pinto beans on the side.

    Now, that's a recipe for chili!

    Darn, I'm out of Mexican oregano.
    #26
    roossy90
    Sirloin
    • Total Posts : 6695
    • Joined: 2005/08/15 16:17:00
    • Location: columbus, oh
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    RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine 2005/10/11 17:21:40 (permalink)
    rotelle is a pantry staple
    =========================
    In mine also... I prefer the 'hotter" one...
    #27
    Scallion1
    Cheeseburger
    • Total Posts : 418
    • Joined: 2004/07/20 08:42:00
    • Location: Yonkers, NY
    • Status: offline
    RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine 2005/10/11 23:02:08 (permalink)
    I'm not going to comment on these recipes; I'm sure a lot of them are great.

    But several of them hit a nerve: there's absolutely no reason to use extra virgin olive oil to saute the vegetables. It goes against my chef's hatred of waste. The best palate ever born couldn't tell the difference between using xvoo and "pure" olive oil, or, for that matter, Wesson oil, in these circumstances.

    I renege: I will comment. The following have no place in making chili: olives. tomato soup. liquid smoke. vinegar. dried parsely/dried cilantro (should both be outlawed). chicken stock. cheeses. store-bought chopped garlic (should be outlawed). green beans. cauliflower. pizza sauce.

    Go ahead and scream. You may be making something that tastes good, but it sure ain't chili.
    #28
    mr chips
    Filet Mignon
    • Total Posts : 4727
    • Joined: 2003/02/19 00:15:00
    • Location: portland, OR
    • Status: offline
    RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine 2005/10/15 00:12:48 (permalink)
    An inteesting group of recipes. My mother used to use moose meat as my grandfather usually shot one each year in B.C.
    #29
    roossy90
    Sirloin
    • Total Posts : 6695
    • Joined: 2005/08/15 16:17:00
    • Location: columbus, oh
    • Status: offline
    RE: Let's see the recipes - here is mine 2005/10/15 12:13:19 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by Scallion1

    I'm not going to comment on these recipes; I'm sure a lot of them are great.

    But several of them hit a nerve: there's absolutely no reason to use extra virgin olive oil to saute the vegetables. It goes against my chef's hatred of waste. The best palate ever born couldn't tell the difference between using xvoo and "pure" olive oil, or, for that matter, Wesson oil, in these circumstances.

    I renege: I will comment. The following have no place in making chili: olives. tomato soup. liquid smoke. vinegar. dried parsely/dried cilantro (should both be outlawed). chicken stock. cheeses. store-bought chopped garlic (should be outlawed). green beans. cauliflower. pizza sauce.

    Go ahead and scream. You may be making something that tastes good, but it sure ain't chili.


    Ok.. lets hear your recipe for "chili"
    As this online dictionary puts it:...chil·i also chil·e or chil·li (ch#301;l'ç)
    n., pl. chil·ies also chil·es or chil·lies.
    The pungent fresh or dried fruit of any of several cultivated varieties of capsicum, used especially as a flavoring in cooking. Also called chili pepper.
    Chili con carne.
    Chili
    A hearty, thick soup often made with meat and/or beans in a tomato base
    chili con car·ne (k#335;n kär'nç)
    n.
    A highly spiced dish made of red peppers, meat, and often beans.

    [Spanish : chile, chili + con, with + carne, meat.]


    Let's see yours...
    #30
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