Hot!Maryland Fried Chicken

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Phildelmar
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2006/03/23 22:12:21 (permalink)

Maryland Fried Chicken

Anyone up for discussing what makes this so special and so good?
#1

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    signman
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    RE: Maryland Fried Chicken 2006/03/23 22:19:46 (permalink)
    Why don't you start, and steer us to some of your favorite places.
    #2
    Phildelmar
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    RE: Maryland Fried Chicken 2006/03/23 22:53:46 (permalink)
    am a novice in this area..have chiefly experienced it at festivals aroind here..would welcome some guidance from locals with more knowledge
    #3
    BuddyRoadhouse
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    RE: Maryland Fried Chicken 2006/03/23 23:17:45 (permalink)
    This begs the question raised in a similarly named thread, "Southern Fried Chicken," what makes Maryland Fried Chicken different from regular fried chicken?

    Buddy
    #4
    essvee
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    RE: Maryland Fried Chicken 2006/03/23 23:50:37 (permalink)
    I've never had it, but recipes I've read have stated that it is fried with a cover on the skillet, and served with a cream gravy.
    #5
    signman
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    RE: Maryland Fried Chicken 2006/03/24 00:10:25 (permalink)
    Based on this article, I'd say you have to look pretty hard for Maryland Fried Chicken.

    http://www.southernliving.com/southern/images/travel_ss/food/650788/chickenchart.html
    #6
    roossy90
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    RE: Maryland Fried Chicken 2006/03/24 01:10:21 (permalink)
    I have seen three of them here in the Myrtle Beach area...
    I will check it out and let ya'll know...
    I have been curious myself....
    Tara
    #7
    laststandchili
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    RE: Maryland Fried Chicken 2006/03/24 07:43:43 (permalink)
    I've lived in MD going on 4 decades and am unaware of any specialty fried chicken. Please elaborate. I know there are a number of places on the Eastern Shore and in Delaware that do roadside bbq chicken (not sauced, just slow smoke cooked) that is otherworldly, but no special fried version.

    Vayo con Queso
    #8
    porkbeaks
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    RE: Maryland Fried Chicken 2006/03/24 07:53:16 (permalink)
    We've had a Maryland Fried Chicken here in Vero Beach for as long as I lived here (since 1979). Their chicken is great and, if you like them, so are the fried livers. Very good slaw if you don't mind the finely chopped type. Our family refers to it as ABC slaw (already been chewed). Also, the corn fritters are worth the trip. Fresh made, a little powdered sugar, yum. They're busy at lunch and dinner and been in business a long time; must be doing something right. pb
    #9
    Sundancer7
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    RE: Maryland Fried Chicken 2006/03/24 08:04:57 (permalink)
    I have researched Maryland fried chicken and southern fried chicken. There is a thread directly beneath this one asking about that. As far as I can tell, there is very little difference.

    Perhaps experts on the topic will disagree.

    It seems that both use buttermilk, oil, flour, salt and pepper. Each has many different variations.

    Mamaw Smith dips the chicken parts in buttermilk, flour with salt and pepper mixed in and fries it in a cast iron pan about half full of oil. Sometimes she adds a bit of chili powder to the mix.

    Paul E. Smith
    Knoxville, TN
    #10
    Rayme
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    RE: Maryland Fried Chicken 2006/03/24 08:51:25 (permalink)
    Has anyone had fried chicken with Old Bay seasoning? I saw a recipe for that from a place in Baltimore and made it and it was pretty good.
    #11
    Rick F.
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    RE: Maryland Fried Chicken 2006/03/24 09:13:09 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by essvee

    I've never had it, but recipes I've read have stated that it is fried with a cover on the skillet, and served with a cream gravy.
    I can't remember whether she used a lid, but it sounds like Paul's Mamaw's and my (W TN) grandmother's recipe. Cream gravy, heavy on the black pepper.
    #12
    seafarer john
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    RE: Maryland Fried Chicken 2006/03/24 11:00:45 (permalink)
    A lot of years ago, before the Interstate was so big, and we traveled the "Veterans Memorial Highway" and the "Blue Star Highway", there was a rest stop on the highway (If memory serves, it might have ben located in the median) someplace east of Baltimore that was famous for its Maryland fried chicken. We stopped there once and had the chicken- it was very good and was a lot like the friccased chicken my mother used to make. It was fried chicken served wih a cream sauce.

    Cheers, John
    #13
    seafarer john
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    RE: Maryland Fried Chicken 2006/03/24 11:08:02 (permalink)
    I forgot to mention that the fine cookbook, "Maryland's Way", has a recipe for Maryland Fried Chicken on p. 95. It seems to be the recipe for the chicken I described in the previous post.

    Cheers, John
    #14
    laststandchili
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    RE: Maryland Fried Chicken 2006/03/24 11:20:02 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by Rayme

    Has anyone had fried chicken with Old Bay seasoning? I saw a recipe for that from a place in Baltimore and made it and it was pretty good.
    I use a heavy hit of old bay in my dry rub for poultry. Soak chicken overnight in buttermilk, coat with rub, on the smoker for 2-3 hours, mop with good EVOO occasionally.

    I don't fry often, but may try the same basic recipe with some breading.

    Vayo con Queso
    #15
    Beer&Snausages
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    RE: Maryland Fried Chicken 2006/03/24 16:47:50 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by Rayme

    Has anyone had fried chicken with Old Bay seasoning? I saw a recipe for that from a place in Baltimore and made it and it was pretty good.


    Alot of the Bars and wing joints have Old Bay Wings (Bill Bateman's here in Reiserstown for one has them). Even one of our grocery stores have them on their take out lunch counter

    But I haven't seen alot of places offer Southern style Fried Chicken with Old Bay on them. Though most places around here like Boardwalk Fries and Crab Joints have Old Bay shakers out with the Salt & Pepper containers. Even Subway has it as one of their choices for adding it to your Sandwich.
    #16
    BTB
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    RE: Maryland Fried Chicken 2006/04/07 12:22:21 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by BuddyRoadhouse

    This begs the question raised in a similarly named thread, "Southern Fried Chicken," what makes Maryland Fried Chicken different from regular fried chicken?

    Buddy

    Some food places play fast and loose with the names or titles that they give to their food or dishes. The traditional Maryland Fried Chicken that I am familiar with uses a bread crumb or crushed cracker coating -- sometimes with a little corn meal. Whereas most "Southern Fried Chicken" recipes use a flour based coating, which can be delicious also. While some recipes may say otherwise, most at the sites below indicate either a bread or cracker crumb coating for Maryland Fried Chicken, which is very different from a floured coating. A bread crumb coating is also what most European fried chicken recipes provide for.
    http://recipes.chef2chef.net/recipe-archive/08/052974.shtml
    http://www.astray.com/recipes/?show=Maryland%20fried%20chicken
    http://www.thriftyfun.com/tf105043.tip.html
    http://search.yumyum.com/recipe.htm?ID=7111
    http://southernfood.about.com/od/friedchicken/r/bln488.htm
    #17
    BuddyRoadhouse
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    RE: Maryland Fried Chicken 2006/04/10 02:46:12 (permalink)
    Thanks for the follow up. Good answer.

    Buddy
    #18
    roossy90
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    RE: Maryland Fried Chicken 2006/04/10 19:24:33 (permalink)
    Hey Phil,
    You stared this post, just exactly what where you referring to? The chain or the style?
    There seems to be some confusion here.
    #19
    Adjudicator
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    RE: Maryland Fried Chicken 2006/04/10 19:34:57 (permalink)
    There is a MFC location located within walking distance from my office. While it once MAY have been part or a chain (and probably was), it seems to be a totally independent entity now. I tried it once or twice, but quality was sub-par. I really couldn't tell if correct "spices" were being used or not, but people in this area wouldn't know KFC from Popeye's if it wasn't for the box it came in.
    #20
    Phildelmar
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    RE: Maryland Fried Chicken 2006/04/10 19:45:26 (permalink)
    The style
    I felt it was a great, but neglected, regional dish, to which I am a newcomer.
    #21
    roossy90
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    RE: Maryland Fried Chicken 2006/04/11 16:16:28 (permalink)
    Thanks for clearing my confusion up...
    #22
    Phildelmar
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    RE: Maryland Fried Chicken 2006/04/11 19:37:19 (permalink)
    Looks like the secrets are in the breading and the gravy
    #23
    Robearjr
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    RE: Maryland Fried Chicken 2007/07/05 21:24:20 (permalink)
    Maryland Fried Chicken has a double batter. You dip the chicken in flour, then egg and then bread crumbs or flour again. The flour is seasoned with salt and pepper. There is no old bay.
    #24
    Wannabchef
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    RE: Maryland Fried Chicken 2007/07/05 21:48:20 (permalink)
    Chicken Maryland or Maryland Chicken is a dish with various interpretations, depending on the country of origin. It is not necessarily known in the U.S. state of Maryland, and is not considered a native dish thereof.

    Maryland Chicken is basically fried chicken served with a cream gravy. A recipe for "Chicken A la Maryland" exists in Escoffier's landmark cookbook "Ma Cuisine". Various recipes differ as to the proper method of breading the chicken (battered, or some combination of an egg-wash, flour, and/or breadcrumbs); the cream gravy also varies widely. There is no canonical, or "central" version (contrast Caesar salad or Beef Wellington, both fairly standardized).

    Other reported versions include: a fried chicken leg with ham and hush puppies (a batter made with flour, egg, oil, and milk or water, to which corn is added, then deep-fried); batter-fried chicken with hush-puppies and batter-fried bananas and pineapple rings; and bread-crumbed and fried chicken wings & drumsticks with sautéed bananas. Apparently some South-east Asian variations exist, such as one with breaded chicken thighs, hush puppies, and gravy, served with deep-fried potato slices, baby carrots, fried tomato halves, and fried bananas.

    The most common elements are: chicken pieces which have been breaded and fried or baked; corn fritters/hush-puppies, and cooked bananas.

    In Australia, the term "Chicken Maryland" refers simply to a whole chicken thigh and leg. It does not imply any specific dish.

    In the United Kingdom a Chicken Maryland is often included on menus in restaurants. Although often considered a kids' meal, adults will order it - it can be a large meal. It consists of battered chicken breast (or drumstick), chips, peas, banana fritter, pineapple fritter, bacon (or a slice of gammon) and fried battered onion rings. Indian and Chinese takeaways and restaurants will often include the meal in a 'European' or 'English' section of their menus.

    The last first class lunch menu on the Titanic included a dish called "Chicken a la Maryland."

    #25
    buffetbuster
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    RE: Maryland Fried Chicken 2007/07/05 21:58:50 (permalink)
    I had some really good fried chicken at Chesapeake Chicken & Rockin' Ribs in Grasonville on the Eastern Shore. I understand they have a second location in Chevy Chase, also.
    #26
    UncleVic
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    RE: Maryland Fried Chicken 2007/07/05 22:13:13 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by Wannabchef

    Chicken Maryland or Maryland Chicken is a dish with various interpretations, depending on the country of origin. It is not necessarily known in the U.S. state of Maryland, and is not considered a native dish thereof.

    Maryland Chicken is basically fried chicken served with a cream gravy. A recipe for "Chicken A la Maryland" exists in Escoffier's landmark cookbook "Ma Cuisine". Various recipes differ as to the proper method of breading the chicken (battered, or some combination of an egg-wash, flour, and/or breadcrumbs); the cream gravy also varies widely. There is no canonical, or "central" version (contrast Caesar salad or Beef Wellington, both fairly standardized).

    Other reported versions include: a fried chicken leg with ham and hush puppies (a batter made with flour, egg, oil, and milk or water, to which corn is added, then deep-fried); batter-fried chicken with hush-puppies and batter-fried bananas and pineapple rings; and bread-crumbed and fried chicken wings & drumsticks with sautéed bananas. Apparently some South-east Asian variations exist, such as one with breaded chicken thighs, hush puppies, and gravy, served with deep-fried potato slices, baby carrots, fried tomato halves, and fried bananas.

    The most common elements are: chicken pieces which have been breaded and fried or baked; corn fritters/hush-puppies, and cooked bananas.

    In Australia, the term "Chicken Maryland" refers simply to a whole chicken thigh and leg. It does not imply any specific dish.

    In the United Kingdom a Chicken Maryland is often included on menus in restaurants. Although often considered a kids' meal, adults will order it - it can be a large meal. It consists of battered chicken breast (or drumstick), chips, peas, banana fritter, pineapple fritter, bacon (or a slice of gammon) and fried battered onion rings. Indian and Chinese takeaways and restaurants will often include the meal in a 'European' or 'English' section of their menus.

    The last first class lunch menu on the Titanic included a dish called "Chicken a la Maryland."




    Not trying to be a arse or anything, but if you quote something from another site (i.e., cut and paste), make sure you give credit to that site: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chicken_Maryland
    Avoids people with copywrites getting all fired up..
    And Welcome to Roadfood!

    #27
    RibRater
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    RE: Maryland Fried Chicken 2007/07/06 14:43:29 (permalink)




    snapped this photo today while driving through bristol va.
    #28
    Robearjr
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    RE: Maryland Fried Chicken 2007/07/06 21:09:04 (permalink)
    On the Maryland eastern shore there used to be a few restaurants called English's Fried Chicken. I dont' know if any of these still exist, but that place sold what I would call Maryland fried chicken. The skin was always crispy, and the seasoning was very basic.
    #29
    Ciaoman
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    RE: Maryland Fried Chicken 2007/07/06 22:28:29 (permalink)
    I'm pretty sure I remember seeing a recipe for Maryland Fried Chicken in an old Time-Life Foods of the World cookbook that dealt with the foods of the Mid-Atlantic region. I specifically recall that the fried bird was served with a peppery cream gravy--to me, the gravy was the unique aspect of the dish. I've never eaten it but, hey, cream gravy is good on most anything.
    #30
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