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 Mexican Bakeries

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jessicazee

  • Total Posts: 132
  • Joined: 2/12/2003
  • Location: Milwaukee, WI
Mexican Bakeries Mon, 03/24/03 12:44 AM (permalink)
Today I stopped at one of the Milwaukee area's fine Lopez Bakery outlets. I love these places. The permutations of color, shape and decoration on the pan dulce and cakes are so beautiful. I remember the first time I had to choose six varieties from the shelves, and it took forever to decide between the cinnamon-sugar shortbread hearts, the pink sugary shells, the yello, pink and white triangle of sweet dough. Today was no different. But they were out of tamales! D'oh!

Does anyone else have any favorite Hispanic bakeries near them? I suppose there might be more in the southwestern U.S. area.
 
#1
    EliseT

    • Total Posts: 2849
    • Joined: 7/11/2001
    • Location: L.A, CA
    RE: Mexican Bakeries Mon, 06/16/03 2:18 PM (permalink)
    There are as many Panaderias (the bakeries that sell the Pan Dulce) as liquor stores near my work. I love the raspberry ones and the little gingerbread pigs. And there is something fun and old-fashioned about walking around with giant tongs and filling a big pizza pie pan with your selections.
     
    #2
      Texicana

      • Total Posts: 185
      • Joined: 7/19/2003
      • Location: Ashland, KY
      RE: Mexican Bakeries Sun, 07/20/03 12:47 PM (permalink)
      Elise have you had Campechanas? Those are my absolute favorites
       
      #3
        EliseT

        • Total Posts: 2849
        • Joined: 7/11/2001
        • Location: L.A, CA
        RE: Mexican Bakeries Mon, 07/21/03 12:44 AM (permalink)
        Cochinitos (piggies) and conchitas (shells) are the only ones I know by name. What do the campechanas look and taste like?
         
        #4
          Hillbilly

          • Total Posts: 992
          • Joined: 8/9/2001
          • Location: North Wilkesboro, NC
          RE: Mexican Bakeries Mon, 07/21/03 9:10 AM (permalink)
          quote:
          Originally posted by jessicazee

          Today I stopped at one of the Milwaukee area's fine Lopez Bakery outlets. I love these places. The permutations of color, shape and decoration on the pan dulce and cakes are so beautiful. I remember the first time I had to choose six varieties from the shelves, and it took forever to decide between the cinnamon-sugar shortbread hearts, the pink sugary shells, the yello, pink and white triangle of sweet dough. Today was no different. But they were out of tamales! D'oh!

          Does anyone else have any favorite Hispanic bakeries near them? I suppose there might be more in the southwestern U.S. area.

          Mi Tierra in San Antonio's market square has a great bakery. It is also the best Mexican restaurant I have ever tried.
           
          #5
            Texicana

            • Total Posts: 185
            • Joined: 7/19/2003
            • Location: Ashland, KY
            RE: Mexican Bakeries Mon, 07/21/03 9:21 AM (permalink)
            Campechanas are flaky pastries with lots of thing layers, about 6 inches long with rounded ends, usually brown in color from the honey that is brushed on the surface, and the sides usually have a dusting of sugar stuck on them. When you bite into them they leave crumbs everywhere!
             
            #6
              EliseT

              • Total Posts: 2849
              • Joined: 7/11/2001
              • Location: L.A, CA
              RE: Mexican Bakeries Tue, 07/22/03 8:52 PM (permalink)
              I'm not sure from that description...pan dulce's win the most crumbs in my lap contest. I'll make sure I get a few of those next stop!
               
              #7
                Mayhaw Man

                • Total Posts: 589
                • Joined: 7/5/2003
                • Location: Abita Springs, LA
                RE: Mexican Bakeries Sat, 07/26/03 12:26 PM (permalink)
                How about a real Mexican Bakery? I worked in Tecate, BC, MX. building a brewery and every day for a couple of years we got bread and sweets from this place. It is just 5 minutes from the border, easy to find, and only about an hour (maybe a little less) in a very interesting sleepy little town. There are a couple of great places to eat. But the bread is amazing. Especially the sweet bread. The town itself is not like most town along the border, much more typical of a town on the central plain. It is a great drive down through east county San Diego with good scenery and a great roadfood spot in Dulzura. A little Oasis (literally) about 10 miles above the border. The Dulzura Cafe has great hamburgers and REALLY cold beverages. The attachment is from the San DIego paper

                Don't miss
                A pigout at El Mejor Pan (011-52-665-654-0040) -- Tecate's most famous bakery. Besides the sweets, try the hot bolillos, Mexico's better-than-French version of a French roll. They roll out of the oven at the bakery several times a day, and locals line up to wait for them. Find the bakery three blocks from the northeast corner of the park on Avenida Benito Juarez #331.
                 
                #8
                  tiki

                  • Total Posts: 4135
                  • Joined: 7/7/2003
                  • Location: Rentiesville, OK
                  RE: Mexican Bakeries Thu, 07/31/03 7:54 PM (permalink)
                  Since moving here to Oklahoma 2 mos ago i havent seen a single Mexican Bakery---beginning to get distinct cravings for all those great little things that i had no idea at all what theyn were called-but they tasted great---especial miss my ginger Pigs!!!Anyone know of a pandaria here in Oklahoma?
                   
                  #9
                    Texicana

                    • Total Posts: 185
                    • Joined: 7/19/2003
                    • Location: Ashland, KY
                    RE: Mexican Bakeries Thu, 07/31/03 7:57 PM (permalink)
                    Yay! Let's hear it for the lil brown ginger cerditos (piggies)
                     
                    #10
                      john_1

                      • Total Posts: 10
                      • Joined: 8/21/2000
                      • Location: San Diego, CA
                      RE: Mexican Bakeries Mon, 09/15/03 12:51 AM (permalink)
                      In Tijuana, one main street east of Revolucion, was my favorite Panaderia. It was right next to the Ford dealership, jut a couple blocks away from the road everybody takes back to San Diego. They were still there last trip. I've been going there for 30 years and, though the prices have gone up considerably, you can still get about a shoppign bag full of goodies for a few bucks. I like those pink cookies, bollijos fresh and hot are GREAT, those frenchkinda cookies shaped like a heart are good, forget what they are called, and most of the ones without any filling are good. Some taste a little funky and I don't ever know what's in them, but 80% are good to my taste buds. Gotta go there again soon. In TJ, almost any panaderia has something good, IMHO. Too bad there aren't as many little local bakeries around as there used to be. In San Diego, the ones I try are not all that great, though there is one in theMira Mea mall that has a couple classics, and there is a French Bakery Shop on Mira Mea Blvd near the SD County Credit Union that has some WONDERFUL interpretations of classic bakery items.
                       
                      #11
                        Ralph Isbill

                        • Total Posts: 185
                        • Joined: 8/25/2000
                        • Location: Midwest City, OK
                        RE: Mexican Bakeries Mon, 09/15/03 4:46 AM (permalink)
                        Tiki, there was a Mexican bakery just south of SE 44th and Western. I don't get by there any more so it may be closed by now. If you find one let me know.
                         
                        #12
                          tiki

                          • Total Posts: 4135
                          • Joined: 7/7/2003
                          • Location: Rentiesville, OK
                          RE: Mexican Bakeries Mon, 09/15/03 8:50 AM (permalink)
                          quote:
                          Originally posted by Ralph Isbill

                          Tiki, there was a Mexican bakery just south of SE 44th and Western. I don't get by there any more so it may be closed by now. If you find one let me know.


                          Thank you!and i will!
                           
                          #13
                            Howard Baratz

                            • Total Posts: 445
                            • Joined: 7/3/2000
                            • Location: ,
                            RE: Mexican Bakeries Mon, 09/15/03 2:31 PM (permalink)
                            quote:
                            Originally posted by tiki

                            Since moving here to Oklahoma 2 mos ago i havent seen a single Mexican Bakery---beginning to get distinct cravings for all those great little things that i had no idea at all what theyn were called-but they tasted great---especial miss my ginger Pigs!!!Anyone know of a pandaria here in Oklahoma?


                            Tiki,

                            Here are 2 to look for in Tulsa:

                            Panaderia La Sonrisa - 2617 E. 11th St. (East of Lewis Ave.)

                            Panaderia Y Pasteleria Mexican - 7942 E. 21st St. (West of Memorial Dr.)
                             
                            #14
                              St. Louis Browns fan

                              • Total Posts: 129
                              • Joined: 6/28/2003
                              • Location: Milwaukee, WI
                              RE: Mexican Bakeries Sun, 03/7/04 10:13 PM (permalink)
                              I lived on nickels and dimes in Mexico City in '83 and loved every minute of it. Panaderias provided much of my caloric intake, and it was hard for a single person to spend more than 50 cents. La Nacional (so named because it was near the National Lottery building) served lunchtime comidas of soup, rice, entree, coffee and dessert for 55 pesos. That was a whopping 35 cents!

                              After eating at La Nacional daily for a month, I asked the owners why his prices were so low. He replied, "A little profit is sufficient." Sadly, current prices in Mexico City are right near U.S. levels.
                               
                              #15
                                lennonlover2005

                                • Total Posts: 62
                                • Joined: 12/29/2005
                                • Location: Ann Arbor, MI
                                RE: Mexican Bakeries Thu, 02/23/06 10:20 PM (permalink)
                                here are some mexican pastries...

                                www.sfscratch.com/ mexicanpast.html
                                 
                                #16
                                  lennonlover2005

                                  • Total Posts: 62
                                  • Joined: 12/29/2005
                                  • Location: Ann Arbor, MI
                                  RE: Mexican Bakeries Thu, 02/23/06 10:23 PM (permalink)
                                  Tempting Sweet Breads : Pan de Dulce


                                  By Lynn Cordova, Inez Caldwell, Victor Canchola and Florence Brame comps.





                                  Drawings of Pan de Dulce.
                                  Transplanted Mexican-Americans who branch out to different parts of the U.S. complain of many food woes. Along with a scarcity of chile and decent tortillas is the problem of no Mexican bakeries where they can purchase pan de dulce (sweet bread). A request for sweet bread may yield animal glands!

                                  An El Paso tradition for many families is to have a tall glass of milk and some kind of sweetened bread for a meal. For some families such a light dinner has been a necessity. In the Depression a nickel or dime could buy enough pan to feed many mouths. Even today you can buy a grocery bag full of pan de dulce for under $5.

                                  Carlos and Alicia Cordova, both retired, grew up in the Second Ward and remember that for their First Holy Communion the big treat was to be served pan de dulce and chocolate by their teachers. Alicia says instead of bringing a gift to a birthday party, the guests would take a piece of sweet bread for the birthday child. There would be a big bowl at the entrance of the house for the guests to leave their gifts.

                                  Probably the most famous bakery for those families who lived in the Second Ward, or Segundo Barrio, is still the Bowie Bakery. Generations of families have made the drive downtown to buy sweet bread once they have left the barrio. Today you normally have to stand in line in the bakery, and there is even a Bowie Bakery #2 on North Loop Drive.

                                  The most interesting feature of the bakery is the variety of pastries and their unusual names. New favorites have evolved from holiday customs involving certain shapes and flavors of bread. It is plain, spiced, toasted, coated, sprinkled, twisted and filled. If you have a sweet tooth for pastries, you can die and go to heaven at the Bowie Bakery.

                                  Almost all of the breads are prepared using the same ingredients of flour, water, yeast, salt and shortening. The basic dough is known as the alma, or soul, of the bread. The different types are made by the addition of sugar, eggs, shortening and spices.

                                  Special holiday pan de dulce includes buñuelos usually made to celebrate the Christmas and New Year season. John O. West, local folklorist and author, describes the buñuelos as being plate-sized sweet flour tortillas, deep-fried and sprinkled with cinnamon and sugar. Julia Olmos, a retired El Paso cook, says her grandmother identified the buñuelo as the type of bread eaten by Joseph and Mary on their journey to Bethlehem. Instead of sugar, their bread was topped with salt, since sugar was such a luxury in biblical times.

                                  Cuernos (horns) a sweet crescent-shaped bread flavored with cinnamon, is a traditional bread for All Saints Day, November 1. The crispy cooked ends represent the horns of a bull, which symbolically prod the sinner. The custom associated with it requires the blessing of a smaller version of the bread by the priest to atone for venial sin. The recipient then carries the little rolls in a pocket or purse for good luck or a special blessing.

                                  On Maundy Thursday, commemorating Jesus' Last Supper, a braided bread ring, the rosca, is taken to the church to be blessed by the priest. The bread is then kept at home in the belief that the family will never lack food in the coming year.

                                  Special cookies are baked for weddings, anniversaries and Christmas. Biscochos are rich, bite-sized flour and shortening cookies mixed with port wine and topped with cinnamon and anise. The best ones melt in your mouth.

                                  Empanadas are small piecrust pockets containing apple or pineapple pie filling. A variation is a spiced bread dough crust with pumpkin inside. Also available is a white sugar-dusted piecrust filled with vanilla pudding.

                                  Another filled sweet bread is elote (corn). This bread is made of soft anise-flavored dough and filled with strawberry jelly. At the Bowie Bakery, cuernos are also filled with crema (vanilla pudding) or pineapple pie filling.

                                  Marranitos (little pigs) are thick pig-shaped ginger cookies. Another type of cookie is a large pink one known as polvoron roja (pink powder). It is sweet and faintly cherry-flavored. Galleta de nuez is a vanilla-flavored bar cookie, laced with chopped pecans.

                                  Pan de huevo (egg bread) refers to a number of different round flat breads with colored powdered sugar toppings and various flavorings. They are usually not very sweet except for the topping and taste great dunked in coffee. The powdered sugars form spiral and diamond shapes on the top of the bread, which is available in vanilla and chocolate.

                                  A variation of pan de huevo is arracadas (earrings). They have a center, which looks like the regular pan de huevo, but another sweeter dough is wrapped around the outside and designed with ridges. Cabeza de Negro is shaped like other pan de huevo with little pinches of dough in a pattern similar to short braided hair. It is made from dough sweetened with cinnamon and anise and covered with granulated sugar.

                                  There are three different types of "plain" bread. Semitas are similar in shape to pan de huevo but have no topping. They are honey-flavored and often have anise added. It is believed to be a traditional bread for the Semites, hence the name. Protestantes are oval, golden-brown with breads, for some reason associated with Protestants. Pan de suelo (floor bread) is round and not very sweet.

                                  Other breads include magdalenas, which are round, flattened and sweetened with coconut and raisins. Calvos (baldies) are also known as novias (brides). They are the same shape as the magdalenas, but are ringed with coconut and iced with white confectioners' frosting. They resemble a bald man's head with a fringe of hair.

                                  Two types of bread made with multi-layer pastry are almohadas (pillows) and campechanas. Campechanas (jovial persons) are flaky, round and golden-brown with a shiny sugar glaze. They are sometimes made in different shapes and filled with jelly or pie filling.

                                  Some American bread are also available but have local names. Cinnamon rolls are Simones (slang for "yeah, man"). Jellyrolls are niños envueltos (children wrapped up). Round, pudding-filled doughnuts frosted with chocolate are sapos (frogs). The closest bread to Danish is called a casuela (casserole dish). It is doughnut-shaped and has fillings of pudding and cherry jelly. Tarts are little baskets, or canastillas, filled with pineapple.

                                  Two very sweet creations are yoyos and marianas. Yoyos look just like their namesake. They are two soft cookies joined with thin glue of confectioners' icing. Then they are rolled in raspberry jelly and finally in coconut. Marianas look similar to the yoyos with the raspberry and coconut coating but are shaped like the small sponge cake Americans use for strawberry shortcake. They have confectioners' sugar icing piped around the top of the cake which contains cherry or pineapple filling. They are extremely rich!

                                  These are not all of the different types of pan de dulce made in our border area. There are close to 300 different types of bread made in Mexico that have been documented, not to mention the local variations. However, this is a good start on the most common ones, so that the next time you are feeling adventurous or want to surprise the people who work at a Mexican bakery, you can go in and ask for your sweet bread by name.
                                   
                                  #17
                                    oxmichellyxo

                                    • Total Posts: 3
                                    • Joined: 8/9/2007
                                    • Location: los angeles, CA
                                    RE: Mexican Bakeries Fri, 08/10/07 10:36 PM (permalink)
                                    hi everyone! i was just curious as to which mexican bakery is the most popular and has the BEST panaderias??
                                     
                                    #18
                                      El Chorizo

                                      • Total Posts: 8
                                      • Joined: 8/8/2007
                                      • Location: Yazoo City, MS
                                      RE: Mexican Bakeries Fri, 08/10/07 10:48 PM (permalink)
                                      hi everyone! i was just curious as to which mexican bakery is the most popular and has the BEST panaderias?? `


                                      As for me any bakery south of 22nd st in South Tucson would fit that bill. I guess you could say that in just about any heavily populated Hispanic area, seek and ye shall find.
                                       
                                      #19
                                        oxmichellyxo

                                        • Total Posts: 3
                                        • Joined: 8/9/2007
                                        • Location: los angeles, CA
                                        RE: Mexican Bakeries Sat, 08/11/07 12:22 PM (permalink)
                                        As for me any bakery south of 22nd st in South Tucson would fit that bill. I guess you could say that in just about any heavily populated Hispanic area, seek and ye shall find.

                                        Thanks! but i was really hmm.. talking more alongs the lines of like, a most known mexican bakery.. like how for coffee, we think of starbucks or coffee bean
                                         
                                        #20
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