Most and least favorite PBS cooking shows

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hermitt4d
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RE: Most and least favorite PBS cooking shows 2003/08/21 09:22:06 (permalink)
My all time favorite TV chef, hands down, Jacques Pepin. I've loved everything he's done. I really liked the show with his daughter - hilarious interactions between the two, also the one with Julia.

I liked the show Julia did with the various celebrity chefs from around the country - can't remember the name of it now, tho I've got it on tape.

The worst - Yan, Nick Stellino, I cannot watch the early Graham Kerr, but I kind of like the one more recent series he's done that I've seen.

Ming Tsai is one who's not been mentioned in this thread. I like East meets West - I want one of those conduction woks he uses from time to time (or is it induction?).
#61
jgleduc
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RE: Most and least favorite PBS cooking shows 2003/08/21 09:24:48 (permalink)
Sticking with current PBS cooking shows (no Julia), I must say I have a bit of a love/hate relationship with the America's Test Kitchen/Cook's Illustrated crowd. I know that others have praised the show here, and I'm not blind to its qualities (or the magazine's.) It's often interesting and well-grounded, giving good, careful information on what they're doing and why. And there is no (or very little) showiness, just a focus on the cooking. So what's not to like? Well...I find the emphasis on the "best" recipe annoying - the best cookie, the best tomato sauce and so on. What they mean is, the one they like best. But not everyone shares their taste, at least not all the time. It's a small thing, but it bugs me, especially given their tendency, in my opinion, to add often way too much salt to dishes. I can also recall (this is from the magazine) a carrot cake recipe that they praised for not being oily that had, in fact, far more oil in it than the exceptionally moist recipe I am used to. In general, I find this tendency to praise their rendition of an old favorite as "the best" to be as annoying an affectation as any the more showy cooking shows have.

I also find their emphasis on American comfort food to be both a blessing and a curse. It's all good stuff - pot roast, mashed potatoes and so on - and they generally do it very well. I'm picked up some great pointers from them. But their focus on this type of food can highlight how their forays into other cuisine can be timid anot not as well-founded. ATK is not the source I'd go to for Italian cooking, just for starters.

That said, I must emphasis that I do like their show and find it worthwhile. Another PBS show that I sometimes like is Mary Ann Esposito's, though I haven't watched it in quite a while. On the Food Channel, I find Alton Brown a hoot, though I often wish he would either cut some of the gags or make the show an hour - there are times when there isn't enough time left on the show for much cooking! But he's still fun and the science angle is neat.

JL
#62
NancyPeter
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RE: Most and least favorite PBS cooking shows 2003/08/21 10:46:00 (permalink)
Tony Bourdain - I've never seen his show, but I'd like to. What channel is it on & when? He sat next to me in third grade. The only thing I remember about him is that he could draw extremely well. I guess his talent progressed into cooking...
#63
DinoS
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RE: Most and least favorite PBS cooking shows 2003/08/22 03:04:40 (permalink)
On PBS:

I like Julia and Jacques. Also Lydia's Italian Kitchen.

I enjoy America's Test Kitchen but have a problem with the host. The (female) chefs are fine, but the guy just grates on me.

I basically can't stand any of the shows (I get 3 of 'em) that have anything to do with the Napa Valley. The hosts all seem to be such pretentious twits.

On the Food Network (which I only see when I'm in Phoenix):

Sarah Molton just seems like a 'nice’ person and she seems to know about cooking. I enjoy her interaction with her callers. I liked her show better when it was an hour long.

Mario Batali is also very good. I liked watching him. Is he still on?

I like Rachael Ray's appliances, but never felt like making any of her recipes.

Alton Brown is indeed a hoot - a very funny guy. Love his show.


Dino
#64
jmckee
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RE: Most and least favorite PBS cooking shows 2003/08/22 12:57:24 (permalink)
jgleduc, I am impressed with your analysis of Chris Kimball's show and magazine. I love to cook, and wouldn't be without Cook's Illustrated, particularly since they have begin to really concentrate on somebody who's cooking at home, likes top-knotch cooking, but doesn't have the resources of a restaurant and/or a tv studio and prep staff at hand. And the equipment reviews are really top-notch.

But you are correct: The "BEST" obsession is a little annoying and rather snotty. I find that some of their recipes, while innovative and very successful, have odd qualities. Their lemon bars, for instance, boast of clean, clear lemon flavor; in fact, they are almost too tart. They also seem to be obsessed with texture; again, as an example, I think that if I see the phrase "pickle-crisp" one more time I'll scream. (I must add that, as a person who was raised on Southern food, listening to a bunch of New Englanders talk about what certain Southern dishes should taste like is kind of amusing. The Sterns live in the northeast, but they have researched their stuff over a couple decades of travel.)

Also, Cook's seems to have become a conglomerate. Used to be just the magazine and the annual compilation. Now I get flyers and phone calls for book after book after book. Plus the website, which you have to pay to access, even if you are a subscriber--unlike every other magazine website I know of. Plus the clothes ($45 polo shirts?). And I've noticed that the last two issues have not featured cookbook reviews--one of the magazine's most useful features. Could it be that Mr. Kimball is too busy touting his own publications to encourage you to purchase other worthy cookbooks?

OK. Rant over.
#65
NancyPeter
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RE: Most and least favorite PBS cooking shows 2003/08/22 16:39:24 (permalink)
Yes, I agree that Lydia's Italian Kitchen is very interesting. She definitely "knows her stuff."
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Vince Macek
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RE: Most and least favorite PBS cooking shows 2003/08/22 16:54:11 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by yumbo

Hi All -

Any of you want to sound off on the PBS cooking shows? Here in the Puget Sound we have two stations, and on Saturday afternoon (provided the grass isn't butt-high) I love to sit in front of the TV and tape shows.

Loves - Anything with Jacques Pepin and Julia Child, that show hosted by those two Italian-Texan good ol' boys,

Dislikes - Nick Stellino, Graham Kerr (Fat free, taste free!), Martin Yan.


I'm gonna have to pull a 'me too' here and give my props to Julia Child and Justin Wilson - are their old shows available on video?

Dislikes? I dislike something, I don't watch. Life is short - go for the good!
#67
eelranch
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RE: Most and least favorite PBS cooking shows 2003/08/23 15:27:12 (permalink)
I have been outside of PBS's broadcast area for a couple of years, but my faves have long been Justin Wilson (I even have some of his records) and Martin Yan (c'mon folks - lighten up). No one seems to have mentioned Mary Ann Esposito or the Pizza Gourmet. The Pizza Gourmet was actually of the Jewish persuasion and his funniest show was the one where he made a bread cornucopia that he referred to throughout the show as a "copacornia". You don't have to be Italian, but it helps! I picked up some great ideas from hiom though....

The one chef who really grated on my nerves was the severe looking midwestern cook who always said 'budder' and 'wadder'.
#68
RockyB
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RE: Most and least favorite PBS cooking shows 2003/08/24 15:47:26 (permalink)
I am a serious grump when it comes to PBS as I have deep political problems with their "public" status. Now with that said I think that any Julia Child show or Jacques Pepin show are teriffic. I also enjoyed when Jacques cooked with his daughter..who I think had the most beautful head of hair I have ever seen..As it was mentioned before, he was so funny giving her all the drudge work and you could tell she had a hell of a temper, and was always trying to keep it in check. I also liked Debbie Fields dessert shows, and Justin Wilson, even though I don't care for cajun cooking. I thought he was an excellent storyteller. As for the Food Network, although a lot of people think a little of Emeril goes a long way, it is his presence who have brought viewers to the FoodNet in droves, and if they get them there, then they will branch out to other shows. One of the nicest people on the Food Net is Curtis Aikens, who cooks with vegetables. I'm not sure he's on regularly anymore, I think only specials. I had the opportunity to interview him on the radio in Indianapolis a few years ago and he was one of nicest people I have ever met on this old earth.
#69
pimple2
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RE: Most and least favorite PBS cooking shows 2003/08/25 22:01:37 (permalink)
Does anyone remember the "Great Chefs of ...." series, e.g. Chicago, New York San Francisco? Also, Madeleine Kamman's shows? P.S. What happened to Jeff Smith? I did not realize he had run afoul of something; what was it?
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Linda Gebhardt
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RE: Most and least favorite PBS cooking shows 2003/08/25 22:44:43 (permalink)
On PBS I like to watch The Italian Kitchen, and Julia re-runs
On the Food Network:Emeril, The Two Fat Ladies, Sweet Dreams, Food Unwrapped
#71
John from Pa.
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RE: Most and least favorite PBS cooking shows 2003/08/26 07:34:03 (permalink)
My favorite, also now gone, was "Cookin' Cheap" which was produced by Blue Ridge Public TV and ran on PBS stations and on a cable network for a time. It featured 2 good old Virginia guys, Larry Bly, an ad agency owner, and Laban Johnson, a teacher & lacal actor, cooking simple, Roadfood type recipes sent in by viewers, with lots of humor and low-budget tv effects. These were simple, down home, easy recipes that were easy to prepare.
#72
howard8
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RE: Most and least favorite PBS cooking shows 2003/08/26 09:36:16 (permalink)
Lydia Bastianich is truly a master when it comes to Italian cooking. I really enjoy seeing her cook since she clearly has a real feel for the ingedients and recipes.

Justin Wilson just amazing;terrific personality.

David Rosengarten come on back.

Julia and Jacques great show from two masters of the culinary world.

Americas test kitchen really informative with recipes I have used and enjoyed.

Emeril overexposed. Used to watch but not anymore.

Bobby Flay arragant. Jack McDavid should have the Flay time slot.

Tony Bourdain is the man. In terms of a traveling food show, he tells it like it is; not simply everything is wow and great; that in my mind is the problem with Rachel Ray and other traveling food shows. Everything eaten is so terrific the viewer has little basis for comparison.

Martin Yan is annoying. He is so in love with his machine gun style chopping.
#73
Rusty246
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RE: Most and least favorite PBS cooking shows 2003/08/26 10:13:11 (permalink)
We have just started airing a show called BBQU with Steve Rachlion, he is an excellent outdoor cook! He also has a website, and a BBQ cooking school in WVA, pricey, but well worth it I'm sure.
#74
kland01s
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RE: Most and least favorite PBS cooking shows 2003/08/26 12:14:03 (permalink)
Rick Bayless's cooking show must not be shown out of the Chicago market. He's chef/owner of Topolabambo and Fronteira and has written a number of cook books. He is excellant because he not only show how to make something but he gets in to the history or region of Mexico that the dish comes from, usually taping a part of the episode in that region and part in his Chicago home kitchen. It's on our PBS station WTTW Channel 11 on Saturday afternoon.
#75
eaglerich
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RE: Most and least favorite PBS cooking shows 2003/08/29 04:25:30 (permalink)
"Mexico One Plate at a Time" is indeed available outside of Chicago.
We get it here in Las Vegas, and it's one of my favorite shows. Also, anything with Julia or Jaques. "Lydia's Italian Table " is also very good.
I've learned a great deal about cooking from Bobby, Ming, and Emeril, but I don't do many of their recipes- too "cheffy" for me.
As for Rachel, I can watch her show, but I'd never wait on her....she needs to learn how to tip.
#76
kland01s
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RE: Most and least favorite PBS cooking shows 2003/08/29 09:56:54 (permalink)
In regard to Rick Bayless, I just read this in Metromix.com in an article called "Kitchens with a conscience":


Chef Rick Bayless has done more than change the way America looks at Mexican cooking, he's also been an ardent supporter of various causes, including local farmers. For years, Bayless has added a dollar to the price of each bottle of wine, donating the proceeds to nonprofit groups like Chefs Collaborative, a national organization that supports sustainable food production. This year, Bayless and his staff established the Frontera Farmer Foundation, a nonprofit organization that provides grants to small,sustainable farms that serve Chicago's restaurants and farmers markets. "Notonly do local farms provide great quality food, but they add immeasurably to the fabric of the community with their civic commitments, interactions with restaurant chefs and their presence at farmers markets," says Bayless.
#77
KimChee43
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RE: Most and least favorite PBS cooking shows 2003/08/29 11:43:52 (permalink)
I saw a "Great Chefs" episode on the Travel Channel a short time ago. Check their schedule for upcoming episodes.

I love the "Two Fat Ladies". I bought all of the episodes from the first two seasons on VHS which are uncut. It's a pity that the Food Network shaved off at least 10 minutes of each episode to fit in all of the commercials. I can't seem to find the last two seasons on either VHS or DVD. Does anyone know if they're even available?

Jennifer Paterson was always my favorite food personality. I was devastated when she passed away so suddenly in 1999. Her family and friends got together and published a collection of their favorite memories of her. I have that book. It's great. I never really dug Clarissa. She seemed like a snob.

Anything featuring Keith Floyd ("Floyd on France" was on PBS once) is usually a kick. He always had to "have a slurp" (his words) of something containing alcohol (usually wine)throughout the show. A few years ago, we bought his "Wines of France" series through amazon.com for half price. It is one of the most entertaining series I've ever seen. He discussed and tasted wines from the different regions of France with a British wine expert. The audience was told which kinds of wine to buy for the next episode, so it was then possible to "slurp" right along with Keith Floyd and his wine expert. Floyd's wine-tasting glass resembled a large water goblet. Whenever he tasted a wine, almost half of the bottle went into that glass. Then, he'd cook some dish representative of the region being studied. Sometimes, he'd end up cooking outdoors on a type of camp stove, always with a full wine glass next to him. I think he's priceless.
#78
tarragon
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RE: Most and least favorite PBS cooking shows 2003/08/29 12:08:40 (permalink)
I used to watch the PBS cooking shows on Saturday, but haven't in many years, as my favorites will reveal! I actually liked the Natalie Dupree show, but my real favorite was Marcia Adams Amish cooking from Quilt country. Boy, did she have some good recipes on there! Hearty meat and potatoes food, though; do -not- try to eat this food if you're counting calories!
[:D]
I haven't seen her shows in years, though.

Another one that I watched with a kind of love/hate relationship was "Cooking with Kurma," an Australian-based Hare Krishna vegetarian. His shows were always very interesting, but he always used one spice (asafetida powder) in almost every dish! I don't know why, but I think it was even used in desserts. Many of the dishes were also Indian/South Asian, but he also offered basic vegetarian dishes (grains/beans, some of the recipes were vegan even). Haven't seen his show in years either, but apparently he's still cooking in Australia, and even has a Cooking with Kurma show on there still.

~~tarragon~~
#79
KimChee43
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RE: Most and least favorite PBS cooking shows 2003/08/29 12:21:06 (permalink)
For anyone interested in Keith Floyd's series on the wines of France...I rummaged through by videos and learned that the name of the series is "Floyd Uncorked". It might still be available through amazon.com.
#80
champale
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RE: Most and least favorite PBS cooking shows 2003/08/29 12:38:39 (permalink)
here in new york (channel 13), jacques is king and lydia is queen. they usually run back-to-back on sunday afternoons. i really love the interplay between jacques and the all-time tv-chef goddess, julia child. speaking of julia, has anyone heard about the artist in brooklyn whose project is making every single one of the recipes from the julia child cookbook? talk about labor intensive.

other baseless opinions on pbs cooking shows:

america's test kitchen -- ick. i hate their choice of recipes, the set design, the dumb aprons, the glib host.

martin yan -- haven't seen him in years. too un-pc for the new york audience?

michael chiarello -- the golden hills of napa are pretty seductive, but there's something about this guy that rubs me the wrong way. is it his constant overcompensating reassurances that there's a connection between his pretentious nouvelle italian food and his good old grandmother? la tua casa non e la mia casa, cugino.

the texas-italian good old boys -- these dudes were like the car guys of pbs food. but they have sadly disappeared from the 13 lineup.

lydia bastianich -- she used to frighten me. i thought she might step out of the tv and rough me up with a rolling pin. but now i LOVE watching her cook and tell slightly awkward stories. you can't get much more authentic than those jiggling arms. she rules.

jacques pepin -- i wish he were my dad, even though his daughter always seems slightly traumatized. how can you ever do anything right around this guy? he cooks, he skis, he's got a post-grad degree from columbia, and he's a handsome little devil. i can't get enough of this show.

as for the oldies, i'd love to see the galloping gourmet again, just for laughs, and the old julia child series, too. and what about the fallen zeus of pbs food shows, the frugal gourmet? isn't he in jail?
#81
Mayhaw Man
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RE: Most and least favorite PBS cooking shows 2003/08/30 10:11:02 (permalink)
Last night, on the food network (I know this is about PBS, but everybody seems to have been breaking that rule so I will too) Tony Bourdain's Food/Travel show was everything that television about food should be.

The show was about BBQ and he did two smart things right off the bat. He admitted he knew very little about it (except that it was a fun thing to both eat and be around) and he also said that no matter how hard he tried, he would not be able to cover everything and make everybody happy. This admission of ignorance should be made by more of these TV guys. It would go a long way to describe why so many of them come off like pompous asses.He also pointed out that the argument/conversation chances with BBQ were limitless. There is discussion potential for:

1) The Pit/Cooking Unit
2) Meat
3) Fuel
4) Seasoning/Sauce
5) Expertise of the pit boss
6) You name it

He covered Kansas City, Houston, and NC (east and west). He covered these subjects in a very linear, limited way and it made for great television.

First stop in KC was Oklahoma Joes for pork sandwiches and then on to Paul Kirk (the Self Appointed King of KCBBQ). It was not so much about the Q, but about how he trims his briskets and the way he cooks them (hanging, in this cool clamp setup, must be nice to have an $8000 rig). His unit was made in Houston @Kloses in Houston. Where the show went next

At Klose's the program showed alot of swell pits, and some BBQ being cooked by Klose himself. THe best thing he had going (I know that it is not classic Q, but it looked damned good) was a #10 prawn stuffed with crab and wrapped in chicken which was wrapped with bacon and marinated in white wine over night. Oh Boy. Those things looked great.

Tony then traveled to NC. First stop was at Mitchells in Wilson for whole hog. The buffet looked like a large slice of heaven. Every single part of the hog is used and the better part of the meat is removed from the skin, (the skin is put back on the pit and turned into smoked cracklins, those cracklins were the best looking thing on the whole show), chopped, and the sauce is mixed into the meat (eastern vinegar/no tomato sauce) and the whole thing is placed back on the whole skin and served on a platter along with a buffet of every single part of the hog (yes, this includes innards and eggs and brains). He let the Mitchell Brothers do the talking and stood back. It was really informative.

Last stop was with a couple of brothers (didn't get their name) who cooked western/Piedmont style. Shoulders smoked over a direct fire, producing a juicy crusty meat. It had a thin, tomato based sauce and was served with red coleslaw and hushpuppies. The meat was so tender that when asked for a knife to cut it with, the guy said, " I get fightin mad if I have to do anything but barely pull and get it off the bone".

All in all an interesting show and a great way to kill 30 minutes with a subject I hold dear. I just checked the food network and I could not figure when this will run again. I TIVOed it, so if ya wanna come to my house and watch I guess that will be one way to see it.
#82
jmckee
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RE: Most and least favorite PBS cooking shows 2003/08/30 17:56:37 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by KimChee43



I love the "Two Fat Ladies". I bought all of the episodes from the first two seasons on VHS which are uncut. It's a pity that the Food Network shaved off at least 10 minutes of each episode to fit in all of the commercials. I can't seem to find the last two seasons on either VHS or DVD. Does anyone know if they're even available?

Jennifer Paterson was always my favorite food personality. I was devastated when she passed away so suddenly in 1999. Her family and friends got together and published a collection of their favorite memories of her. I have that book. It's great. I never really dug Clarissa. She seemed like a snob.



I like Clarissa. I don't think she's a snob, just veddy veddy British. She's the editor/introduction-writer for a few of those Elizabeth David, et al, reprints Penguin is putting out.

There was a great documentary on Jennifer Paterson after her death on Food Network. What a life! What a character! She knew and cooked for everybody who was anybody in Britain during her career.

Her doctor remembered meeting with her in the hospital to inform her that her illness was terminal (or, as a British actor friend of mine says, "the closing notice has been posted"). He gave her the news, then said, "Is there anything I can do for you?" He said she shot him a look, raised her eyebrows, then said, in that marvelous voice, "Yes! I would simply adore a gin and a cigarette!"
#83
1bbqboy
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RE: Most and least favorite PBS cooking shows 2005/02/04 14:10:23 (permalink)
Any new favorites?
#84
efuery
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RE: Most and least favorite PBS cooking shows 2005/02/04 14:42:57 (permalink)
quote:
My favorite, also now gone, was "Cookin' Cheap" which was produced by Blue Ridge Public TV and ran on PBS stations and on a cable network for a time. It featured 2 good old Virginia guys, Larry Bly, an ad agency owner, and Laban Johnson, a teacher & lacal actor, cooking simple, Roadfood type recipes sent in by viewers, with lots of humor and low-budget tv effects. These were simple, down home, easy recipes that were easy to prepare.


I am so glad you mentioned that show. It was one of my favorites. Those two guys were hysterical. I remember one episode where they were making ceasar salad dressing and after processing the anchovies exclaimed, "my god that looks awful!" (or something like that). Such honesty I had never seen in a cooking show before and haven't seen since. They always finished the show by eating what they cooked and in that episode they said they dressing truly tasted much better than it looked during preparation.
#85
MacTAC
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RE: Most and least favorite PBS cooking shows 2005/02/04 15:47:45 (permalink)
Alton Brown • Funny, very smart, informative, real…

Emeril • Can't take the gollick, BAM!, kick it up a notch or the audience…

$40 a Day • Like the show, not the giggle. I think the tipping situation is just bare minimum to meet the budget. Probably not like that in real life…

Iron Chef • The voice-overs were funny when Woody Allen did "What's Up Tiger Lily?" not in this show. A deal breaker for me…

Bobby Flay • Annoying, arrogant…


Speaking of sloppy, anyone remember the guy on PBS, Earl Peyroux? My in-laws were impressed by his French cooking, but he was always messing things up, overcooking, spilling etc. …
#86
Tedbear
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RE: Most and least favorite PBS cooking shows 2005/02/05 01:15:53 (permalink)
Pimple2--You don't know the Jeff Smith story? Rather sordid, actually.

I was always a little suspicious of the young boys who would occasionally wander through his set, with no explanation of why they were there. It just seemed strange and creepy to me.

Well, after several of his younger male employees filed suit against him for sexual harassment, then the feces really hit the fan. He was accused of molesting several young boys, and in Michael Jackson fashion, the cases were settled out of court, with the terms of the settlement not disclosed. Smith was a minister, as you may recall, and he quickly fell out of favor with his church, as well as with TV producers.

Jeff Smith died last year, so all of this stuff is now behind him, although his victims (assuming that they were telling the truth) will have to live with their experiences for a lifetime. Personally, I always questioned his expertise, since he was perpetually consulting paper lists of ingredients and procedures. If you look at the real pros (Julia, Jacques, Lidia), they don't need cheat sheets in order to do what they do.
#87
skylar0ne
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RE: Most and least favorite PBS cooking shows 2005/02/05 02:35:56 (permalink)
I love cooking shows in general, and always enjoy Julie and Justin. There are two things, however, that really burn my hide when watching. One thing is when they don't seem to be following basic hygeine. Emeril is a notorious offender in this regard. He will walk in, shake the hands of half the people there, then go up and start cooking without washing his hands. I have also seem him break raw eggs and separate them through his hand, again not washing them before he goes on to the next step. When he does wash his hands on camera, it is usually not more than a cursory swish under a running faucet with no soap. Ugh.

The other thing that irritates me is that most of the shows use ingredients that are not available here at my local small town Food Lion or Winn Dixie. If I wanted to make one of their recipes, I would have to drive 90 miles round trip to Charlotte, and pay an exhorbitant price for that special ingredient that I may never even use again. I'm all for expanding my horizons, but at the same time I can't help but wonder why nobody can come up with a tasty elegant dish that uses ingredientss that I am likely to have on hand.
#88
Tedbear
Double Chili Cheeseburger
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RE: Most and least favorite PBS cooking shows 2005/02/05 08:41:23 (permalink)
I agree 100% with Skylar. So many of the chefs on TV will handle raw meat, and then without washing their hands, they will prepare something that does not need cooking, such as a salad. Others will use the same cutting board for meats and for salad ingredients. If you want to give your guests food poisoning, these practices will virtually ensure that outcome!

As to Emeril, I remember reading a newspaper comment about him, to the effect that he is much better at promoting himself than he is at cooking. One of our school's cooking teachers, who knows faculty members at the Culinary Institute of America (CIA), claims that these instructors referred to Emeril as "the worst student ever to graduate from the CIA". Maybe they were jealous of how he has made himself into a multi-national corporation, but then again, they may just be accurately reporting about his skill in the kitchen. As far as I am concerned, he is just extremely annoying.

#89
sugarlander
Cheeseburger
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RE: Most and least favorite PBS cooking shows 2005/03/07 14:39:19 (permalink)
Among the recent best
Gordon Elliott Doorknock Dinners
Two Hot Tamales
Semi-Homemade

I don't watch Emeril--too much show biz, he makes me nervous
#90
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