New England Rolls

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Marsh
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2003/11/06 09:40:02 (permalink)

New England Rolls

I have seen pictures of "lobsta" rolls. It looks like a Poboy roll with the top split instead of the side and the side cut off and butter toasted like out Texas Toast. Or is it soft? I used a Gambino roll when trying to create it. The Gambino along with Leidenheimer is to poboys and muffulettas as Amoroso is to cheesesteaks. Gambino puts out a decent King Cake as well, but I usually get one from Rao's, but I digress. Is the New England rolls soft and squishy or crusty like French bread? And are there any subs for the bread here in Texas?
#1

10 Replies Related Threads

    wanderingjew
    Sirloin
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    RE: New England Rolls 2003/11/06 09:49:42 (permalink)
    It's actually just a plain ol' hot dog roll.
    #2
    i95
    Double Chili Cheeseburger
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    RE: New England Rolls 2003/11/06 09:57:54 (permalink)
    Soft and squishy to complement the soft and squishy lobsta'.
    #3
    johnnym
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    RE: New England Rolls 2003/11/06 10:52:32 (permalink)
    New England hot dog buns have always looked kinda like folded over white bread. It's actually great for grilled dogs and for lobster rolls, because you can butter the roll easily and then grill it in the same skillet you've got the hot dogs in. Way better, in my opinion, than sidesplit rolls.
    #4
    dendan
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    RE: New England Rolls 2003/11/06 12:04:09 (permalink)
    I agree johnnym, the new england roll is much better than a plain 'ole h.d. bun. They have made their way south so we can enjoy them in the Tar Heel state.
    #5
    Lucky Bishop
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    RE: New England Rolls 2003/11/06 17:30:13 (permalink)
    Marsh: it's true, it's just a standard hot dog bun. Pick up a "normal" hot dog bun and imagine it turned 90 degrees, so that the cut is in the middle of the browned side, and squashed slightly in the pan so that the unbrowned sides are touching and therefore remain soft and completely unbrowned, like the insides of the bun.

    As Johnnym says, it's excellent for grilling. Even better, the hot dog (or lobster roll) sits upright on your plate, so that your condiments don't slide off!
    #6
    jvsmom
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    RE: New England Rolls 2003/11/06 17:47:50 (permalink)
    Ok, dumb question: You mean you can't get those rolls everywhere? I've lived in New England all my life and although I've done a fair amount of traveling, I never knew those were a regional thing. Guess I just never noticed that they weren't available in other areas of the country.
    #7
    Lucky Bishop
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    RE: New England Rolls 2003/11/06 18:03:06 (permalink)
    Nope. They until very recently were strictly a New England thing, and even now, you won't often find them south of Connecticut or west of New York.
    #8
    Michael Hoffman
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    RE: New England Rolls 2003/11/06 19:17:53 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by Lucky Bishop

    Nope. They until very recently were strictly a New England thing, and even now, you won't often find them south of Connecticut or west of New York.


    Actually, you can get them in Ohio, Pennsylvania, West Virginia and, I believe, Kentucky. Perhaps in more states. Nickles Bakery distributes them in several of these states, and Kroger has it's own brand.
    #9
    dendan
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    RE: New England Rolls 2003/11/07 08:32:24 (permalink)
    Yep, they just started showing up in our area of N.C. - glad of it. Now if I could just get "reasonable" lobster to stuff it with.
    #10
    Marsh
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    RE: New England Rolls 2003/11/07 12:40:30 (permalink)
    Thanks for insight. I am amazed how similar New England seafood is to Louisiana food. I saw Emeril make "stuffies" which to clams is like our stuffed "deviled" crabs and stuffed shrimp. By the way, only recently has people in Houston enjoyed Cajun, its Westward progression has stopped here in Beaumont. Its funny I ate more coonass food in school with steamed boudain and gumbo days, which was mostly leftovers cooked in a roux with bits of chicken and sausage. The scallop and clam rolls look like our shrimp and oyster poboys. But with different bread.
    #11
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