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bakersfieldmom
Junior Burger
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2003/04/13 06:53:02 (permalink)

New to website

Hi. I'm from Bakersfield, Calif but living in Holland. I miss the foods of USA so much, so read your comments for our yearly visits, and daily edification in my dreams. The food in Holland, naturally, is quite different, but interesting. Nothing to write to a website about, but there are fun times in trying to substitute an ingredient in my Calif recipes to a Dutch ingredient. If anyone does want to know about this area, or plan to make a trip to Europe, feel free to ask me questions. We just spent a vacation in Spain/France and ate some delightful local foods. Perks of living in Europe. Barbara
#1

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    mayor al
    Fire Safety Admin
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    RE: New to website 2003/04/13 07:34:48 (permalink)
    Welcome Barbara,
    Sheesch, I thought I had made a cultural jump from the High Desert of SoCal to The Ohio River Valley...but you going from the oil/cotton fields of Bakersfield to the Low Countries is a major jump!!
    A couple of questions, How do the Dutch food markets compare to the American Supermarket style of grocery shopping? and Do our Dutch Friends have a comparison custom of outdoor cooking that uses "BBQ" techniques?
    Keep those posts coming.
    AL- The former Mayor of Cajon Pass.[
    #2
    bakersfieldmom
    Junior Burger
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    RE: New to website 2003/04/13 15:31:55 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by Al-The Mayor-Bowen

    Welcome Barbara,
    Sheesch, I thought I had made a cultural jump from the High Desert of SoCal to The Ohio River Valley...but you going from the oil/cotton fields of Bakersfield to the Low Countries is a major jump!!
    A couple of questions, How do the Dutch food markets compare to the American Supermarket style of grocery shopping? and Do our Dutch Friends have a comparison custom of outdoor cooking that uses "BBQ" techniques?
    Keep those posts coming.
    AL- The former Mayor of Cajon Pass.[

    Hi Al....Not sure how this thing works, so will try to answer this way. It may be all messed up, but hey, I tried! I moved from Ohio River Valley (Rayland, Ohio) to Bakersfield, Ca, and you went the other way. Small world.
    As to your questions, there are the outdoor markets, which I go to the one on Monday mornings. There is a wide range of vegetables, etc. and also materials to make dresses, curtains and even craft things. They are held rain, snow, or sunshine year round.Usually, because Holland, and my town, is so small, I see a relative each time. My local market is on Fridays and it is smaller, for the usual mealtime items. I do not buy my produce there, because they tend to try to slip in the rotten ones with the good ones. I go to 3 different grocery stores, one for inexpensive items, one for meats, and one for the rest of the needs of the home. A few items are similar to the States, but there is not the variety, nor the quality.. I can buy one of a lot of things, but never comparision shop. Of course, the items are made for the taste of the culture, so things like tomato catsup, or lasagna and such are of a different taste.
    As to BBQ's, yes, they have them but not like we do. They call the meat package "fondue, or gourmet" and it is usually 3 pieces of each: chicken, bit of pork, ground meat, and a bacon wrapped meat. None of it is good, according to my American tastes. Most meat is pork and very fatty. Beef is tough and so not suitable for BBQ's. There isn't the usual charcoal type BBQ, but more of the indoor electric type, and never do families get together as in America. Remember, all of the above is not a negative judgement; they have learned one way and we another. It works for them. And things are changing. Fast. In the 5 years I've been married and living here, I've seen major changes toward the Western way of doing things. It's exciting, but also sad, because what is here is Dutch, and should not be lost. It does take some getting used to, simply because it is a different culture, neither good nor bad. Flowers are cheap; I buy enough each market day for the whole house for 5 Euro.30-40 roses and other wonderful flowers. Barbara
    #3
    Sundancer7
    Fire Safety Admin
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    RE: New to website 2003/04/13 15:41:31 (permalink)
    Barbara, I have spent a lot of time in your country. Amsterdam, rotterdamn and a dozen other cites I cannot recall. I have done the tulip thing several times in the spring and each time, I was amazed at the fields of tulips blooming and the festival was fantastic. One of the things that I particularly enjoyed was the fish available and the breakfast available at the hotels were unusual and very good. Great spreads. I have flown out of the Amsterdamn airport many times. Very good and very pretty. I have driven many miles in the country and have crossed the area that I called the Zider Zee.

    Paul E. Smith
    Knoxville, TN
    #4
    bakersfieldmom
    Junior Burger
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    RE: New to website 2003/04/13 16:01:27 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by Sundancer7

    Barbara, I have spent a lot of time in your country. Amsterdam, rotterdamn and a dozen other cites I cannot recall. I have done the tulip thing several times in the spring and each time, I was amazed at the fields of tulips blooming and the festival was fantastic. One of the things that I particularly enjoyed was the fish available and the breakfast available at the hotels were unusual and very good. Great spreads. I have flown out of the Amsterdamn airport many times. Very good and very pretty. I have driven many miles in the country and have crossed the area that I called the Zider Zee.

    Paul E. Smith
    Knoxville, TN


    Hi Paul, yes the tulips are just coming up now. We've had a cold winter, lots of snow. Today is the first nice day, although it did freeze last night. From now on, it is supposed to be in the 20's Celsius,so the tulips will be popping their heads open soon.The daffodils are lovely, and everywhere. No one picks them, so there are thousands in each small village as you pass through. Delightful. Sadly, they are closing a few of the fields,selling out for housing, but they will always have enough for tourists to enjoy.
    The breakfasts are a nice thing, bread, cheese, jam and a bit of meat. Sometimes an egg. And lunch is the same. Dinner is the 'warm' meal, but some older families traditionally have their 'warm' meal at lunch time.
    I never miss my fish filet on market day. As you know, you can buy fish just like at a fast food shop in US. It is usually cod, and called lekkerbekje. Even though the Dutch eat lots of cheese and fatty pork, they cycle everywhere,and thus stay a bit slimmer than other countries. Every home has at least 3 bikes, one to have stolen(it is a beat up wreck), one for around town,shopping and so on, and one for longer rides. Women go to the market with two children and a shopping bag on the bike. I applaud them mentally everytime I see the Dutch people on their cycles. I love the tulips, but oh, the real sights are the people and their wonderful life on bicycles.
    The ZuiderZee is beautiful, and I love the area going from my home to Hoorn, in the North of the country. The polders are a wonder, how they have made the land by pushing the water back, or draining it. I'm glad that you get to A'dam, and if you ever want a private tour of my area (East of A'dam, in the farm country), give me a call. Barbara
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