Pan Fried Steaks

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Sundancer7
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2003/04/05 14:10:17 (permalink)

Pan Fried Steaks

Can you pan fry steaks and get a similiar taste to the way restaurants do. I am doing steaks at a friends who lives in an apartment and they do not allow grills. appreciate any help

Paul E. Smith
Knoxville, TN
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    Michael Stern
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    RE: Pan Fried Steaks 2003/04/05 14:27:35 (permalink)
    I've done it in a big, heavy, well-seasoned cast-iron skillet. You get a great crust that in some ways, to me, does approximate the experience of a restaurant steak grilled at 900 degrees.
    #2
    Sundancer7
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    RE: Pan Fried Steaks 2003/04/05 15:02:04 (permalink)
    Michael, please tell me how you do the steaks in a cast iron skillet?

    Paul E. smith
    Knoxville, TN
    #3
    pigface
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    RE: Pan Fried Steaks 2003/04/05 17:14:58 (permalink)
    Heat .... I got a good steak once shear'd in cast iron which was cooked over a wood fire
    then I ruin'd a steak, trying to get a pan hot over a propane cajun cooker
    Guess we can call that some overkill ... Ruth Chris' Steak house advertises the 1800
    oven / broiler, and a 900 degree pan. I've never got enough heat from the kitchen
    stove, even a Viking Range. My best crust formation has come from Lump Char coal,
    and finishing in the oven.
    #4
    Michael Stern
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    RE: Pan Fried Steaks 2003/04/05 20:54:12 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by Sundancer7

    Michael, please tell me how you do the steaks in a cast iron skillet?

    Paul E. smith
    Knoxville, TN



    Put the skillet on the stove over a high flame until it's smoking hot, then slap on the steak. If the steak isn't fatty, I'd brush it with oil or clarified butter so it didn't stick. After 30 seconds, flip it so the other side gets seared, then cook both sides until done to the way you want it.
    #5
    Cosmos
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    RE: Pan Fried Steaks 2003/04/06 09:58:07 (permalink)
    ...and when you are done, pour some olive oil in the pan, add a lot of sliced garlic, and pour the whole mess over your steak. Cortese's restaurant in Binghamton, NY calls that steak ala milanese. They carry it to the tables steaming with garlic fumes (theres a special exhaust fan they turn on when one comes out).
    #6
    Sundancer7
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    RE: Pan Fried Steaks 2003/04/06 12:55:40 (permalink)
    Thanks Cosmos and Michael for the tips. I will try today.

    Paul E. Smith
    Knoxville, TN
    #7
    scbuzz
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    RE: Pan Fried Steaks 2003/04/07 08:24:20 (permalink)
    I believe that a cast iron skillet is a must for this. You can even buy a cast iron skillet that has the raised ridges in the middle. Gives your steak a look like it was grilled !

    I like to sear the outside of the steak, usually with some butter and olive oil in the pan, and then place the pan with the steak into a pre-heated hot oven for few minutes. Sometimes I will even toss in some mushrooms, onions and garlic when I put the pan in the oven.

    #8
    rumbelly
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    RE: Pan Fried Steaks 2003/04/09 00:07:10 (permalink)
    Dudes, season the hell out of em and use commercial non-stick pans heated to hades temps. Let em rest.
    #9
    mayor al
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    RE: Pan Fried Steaks 2003/04/09 21:03:29 (permalink)
    Hey Guys,
    They invented the 'Jenn-Aire' stove-grilltop just so y'all wouldn't have to worry about washing the pan.
    Boy can you play havoc with the smoke detectors in a kitchen if you let that implement get out of hand!!
    #10
    Sundancer7
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    RE: Pan Fried Steaks 2003/04/10 08:07:15 (permalink)
    The smoke detector was one of the reasons I had to quit cooking with Olive oil. After the fire department came to my house the second time, they had a discussion with me. Both times it was because my lack of knowledge regarding the low cooking ability of olive oil created smoke. smoke which set up my detector and notified the fire department. I was embarassed when I created a scene on my street with all kinds of red vehicles parked around.

    Paul E. Smith
    Knoxville, TN
    #11
    jmckee
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    RE: Pan Fried Steaks 2003/04/10 12:17:03 (permalink)
    I recently began using Julia Child's method for very, very thick steaks. I sear them in my LeCreuset enameled cast iron skillet, then finish in a moderate(300-350 degree) oven until done to our liking.

    This method gets the seared crust you want, but doesn't toughen the steak.
    quote:
    Originally posted by Michael Stern

    quote:
    Originally posted by Sundancer7

    Michael, please tell me how you do the steaks in a cast iron skillet?

    Paul E. smith
    Knoxville, TN



    Put the skillet on the stove over a high flame until it's smoking hot, then slap on the steak. If the steak isn't fatty, I'd brush it with oil or clarified butter so it didn't stick. After 30 seconds, flip it so the other side gets seared, then cook both sides until done to the way you want it.

    #12
    VibrationGuy
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    RE: Pan Fried Steaks 2003/04/10 14:50:21 (permalink)
    I'm a fan of the sear-and-rest-in-oven method, but I prefer Calphalon hard anodized (not the nonstick) to cast iron, as you can make a pan sauce after the skillet comes out of the oven, and I use a lower oven temperature (250F) for the rest period.

    If you feel so inclined when the meat comes out of the oven, slip it onto a warm platter while you heat the pan back up, saute a couple of minced shallots in the drippings, reduce the heat to medium-low, and deglaze the pan with chicken stock, scraping up all the chewy bits, then add a couple of slugs of medium-bodied red wine (no cabernet or merlot - too chewy/tannic). Don't deglaze the hot pan with red wine; it really is a negative flavor impact. Remove from heat, whisk in a couple of lumps of cold butter and maybe a half-teaspoon of dijon mustard.

    That sticky stuff on the bottom of the pan (fond) is your friend. It's a shame to let the sink and scrubbie pad get it all.

    Eric
    #13
    PineSlayer
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    RE: Pan Fried Steaks 2003/04/26 13:28:47 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by jmckee

    I recently began using Julia Child's method for very, very thick steaks. I sear them in my LeCreuset enameled cast iron skillet, then finish in a moderate(300-350 degree) oven until done to our liking.

    This method gets the seared crust you want, but doesn't toughen the steak.



    Are there any guidelines for time per inch for Med Rare?
    Thanks!
    #14
    jmckee
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    RE: Pan Fried Steaks 2003/04/29 16:41:36 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by PineSlayer

    quote:
    Originally posted by jmckee

    I recently began using Julia Child's method for very, very thick steaks. I sear them in my LeCreuset enameled cast iron skillet, then finish in a moderate(300-350 degree) oven until done to our liking.

    This method gets the seared crust you want, but doesn't toughen the steak.




    Are there any guidelines for time per inch for Med Rare?
    Thanks!



    I tend to use the "palm pilot" method. If you feel your palm at the fleshy part, next to the thumb, when relaxed, it's pretty mushy, much like raw meat. As you tighten it up, it gets more firm, like well-done meat. I touch the meat and compare it to my palm. In other words, I don't like timetables. When the meat still gives under a gentle finger, it's about medium rare. Get it off there and put it on a carving board, covered by foil, to rest.
    #15
    RubyRose
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    RE: Pan Fried Steaks 2003/05/08 09:15:00 (permalink)
    Another way to cook them is to sprinkle an even but thin layer of kosher salt on the bottom of a dry cast iron skillet. Heat it up over high heat until the salt just begins to smoke, then slap your steak on one side of the skillet. Sear for about 30 seconds, then flip it over to the unused side of the skillet. The salt seems to intensify the heat. Then I remove it, wipe the remaining salt out of the pan, and add a hunk of butter. I put the steak back in and cook it a bit longer in the butter and any other ingredients of the day.

    Hamburgers are also good when salt-seared.
    #16
    Art Deco
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    RE: Pan Fried Steaks 2003/05/23 10:59:09 (permalink)
    I do mine just like VibrationGuy described, except that my pan sauce also gets a shot of good teriyaki sauce...
    #17
    EdSails
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    RE: Pan Fried Steaks 2003/06/04 15:05:03 (permalink)
    My most used pan these days is my cast-iron grill pan. Get one with ridges about 1/2 inch high. Heat the pan slap the seasoned steak (worstershiresauce, pepper and garlic powder) on it and flip over in a few minutes. You'll get perfect grill lines on it. If you want it more then medium rare (a waste in my opinion) you can always finish it in the oven.
    #18
    Julia I
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    RE: Pan Fried Steaks 2003/06/08 10:31:29 (permalink)
    Are there any guidelines for time per inch for Med Rare?
    Thanks!


    I've used the sear-and-roast method on thick steaks with much success. For a 1-1/2 thick steak, my guidelines suggest roasting 2-4 minutes at 450 degrees for very rare, 4-6 minutes for rare, 6-8 minutes for medium rare, or 8-10 minutes for medium. You can even transfer the steak from the cast iron pan to a baking sheet to roast, leaving the pan free for making a pan sauce.
    #19
    rbpalmer
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    RE: Pan Fried Steaks 2003/06/10 12:50:33 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by Sundancer7

    Can you pan fry steaks and get a similiar taste to the way restaurants do. I am doing steaks at a friends who lives in an apartment and they do not allow grills. appreciate any help

    Paul E. Smith
    Knoxville, TN


    It depends on which restaurants you're referring to. If you mean top steakhouses like Morton's of Chicago, Ruth's Chris Steakhouse, Peter Luger's in New York or Harry Caray's in Chicago, the answer is "no." I believe this to be true for several reasons. First, the premium steakhouses have access to top prime beef that is not available in your local supermarket or even most specialty shops. Second, they age the beef for up to six weeks for better taste and tenderness. Finally they broil the meat using commercial ovens at temperatures of up to 1800 degrees, hot enough to sear the outside and seal in the juices without overcooking the cut as a whole. If, on the other hand, you're referring to places like Sizzler or Ponderosa, I would say "sure." In fact, I would much rather have a good, home, pan-cooked steak to one you could get at this type of restaurant. At home, you get to control the degree of done-ness and the seasoning.
    #20
    cudaaman
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    RE: Pan Fried Steaks 2003/06/10 15:09:57 (permalink)
    There's a theory that the best way to know when a pan-fried steak is done is that the smoke alarm goes off. But if, like me, you go into major panic at the sound of a smoke alarm, open a window and cook on each side at raging temp until it's smoking, but not beep inducing (a couple of minutes each side will do). This is my favorite way to cook a steak, known as black and blue -- crusty black outside, really rare inside. For those who enjoy a rare steak, the only way to go in my view.
    #21
    VibrationGuy
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    RE: Pan Fried Steaks 2003/06/10 15:13:17 (permalink)
    I second rb's comments on access to decent beef; there's actually a shortage of USDA Prime on the market right now that is affecting even the best steakhouses (unless they're large enough, like Smith & Wollensky to actually buy their beef as futures), and even in the best of times, it's virtually impossible to get Great Beef for home use.

    That said: there's always Niman Ranch mail order, which is also available at Trader Joe's. There's Oregon Country Beef, available throughout the Northwest, and there's the wonder of developing a relationship with a local butcher shop.

    I also age my own meat at home; you'll need to invest in some temperature and humidity monitoring gear, which can be as simple as something from Radio Shack (under $100) or as complex (and clever) as the thermal monitoring system with web server that my firm builds (starting around $800). It really does work. The loss is not insubstantial, but it's mostly water evaporation, and water, where I come from, is essentially flavorless. The rich, beefy flavor of dry-aged beef is unsurpassed, and unless you have access to one of the rare purveyors of such, you really should do it at home. There's a vguely comforting feeling knowing that you've got meat out in the garage fridge getting better and better. My grandparents recently acquired a new fridge specifically for aging meats and making gravlax (and keeping beer cold). What a lovely way to spend retirement.

    Eric

    nb - Whole Foods Markets often market exceptionally good Choice or Prime dry-aged meat; I had a stunning USDA Prime Standing Rib Roast from my local WFM for Christmas a few years ago - beef like I have never seen in a supermarket before.

    #22
    wesza
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    RE: Pan Fried Steaks 2003/08/05 23:15:28 (permalink)
    If your "Smoke Detector" will cooperate. Then anyone can prepare "Restaurant Quality Steaks, Chops, Fish" at home on a Electric or Gas Stove. The Pan that you use must be Good Quality almost any type or brand. The easiest was to do the job, is to Trick/Bounce the Heat to avoid sticking, prevent Burning and not overwhelm the pan. This is accomplished by letting MSG, naturally do it's magic. When your pan is left upon your hottest burner, approximately 1/3 minutes depending on thickness of pan and how long it takes your stove to heat. When a drop of water dances and disappears its ready. Lightly coat the bottom of pan with MSG, it will become translucent and disolve from the heat. While waiting coat one side of your meat with MSG. Place MSG side down onto your hot pan. Lightly coat other side at with MSG. Allow to cook depending on meats thickness until exterior fat starts to become translucent close to heated bottom. Turn with TONGS, not fork. When the turned side starts to become translucent turn again. Turn several times if meat is Thick. When meats is still sort of bouncy [RARE} put it into plate for a minute or two turning to allow heat to penetrate to center of meat. Place back into pan turning often until cooked to your taste. Let us know if this works for you. When finished, after you've checked the meat to be sure its cooked to your satisfaction. Put water into hot pan carefull to not allow bottom of pan to get wet, as you'll have a WOK. It will be easy to clean after everyone's finished eating. The bottom of Pan can be deglazzed for au jus or whatever with a little wine or? The MSG actually cooks away and has no effect on taste or flavor with this method, prevents sticking and lets you sear and prepare meat oil free, with salt being added to taste by individual eaters.
    #23
    Rick F.
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    RE: Pan Fried Steaks 2003/08/06 00:15:10 (permalink)
    quote:
    I tend to use the "palm pilot" method. If you feel your palm at the fleshy part, next to the thumb, when relaxed, it's pretty mushy, much like raw meat. As you tighten it up, it gets more firm, like well-done meat. I touch the meat and compare it to my palm. In other words, I don't like timetables. When the meat still gives under a gentle finger, it's about medium rare. Get it off there and put it on a carving board, covered by foil, to rest.

    I'll second that: it seems to work very well for me, too. You can also get good advice (and good steaks for special occasions like the Second Coming, given the cost!) from Lobel's in New York: http://www.lobels.com/index_lobels.htm
    #24
    Rick F.
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    RE: Pan Fried Steaks 2003/08/06 00:17:05 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by EdSails

    My most used pan these days is my cast-iron grill pan. Get one with ridges about 1/2 inch high.

    I just got a glass-topped range. Does anyone know of smooth-bottomes grill pans that I can use?
    #25
    Jason Perlow
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    RE: Pan Fried Steaks 2003/08/06 02:10:25 (permalink)
    ooh, thats a toughie. Those kinds of ranges arent really equipped to use cast iron pans, you'll totally ruin the surface and potentially crack it.
    #26
    Lucky Bishop
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    RE: Pan Fried Steaks 2003/08/10 17:43:59 (permalink)
    Hint for getting the cast-iron pan ripping hot if you're doing the cast iron sear and oven finish: keep the pan in the oven while you're preheating it to 500 degrees, then give it a couple minutes on the hottest burner before you slap the steaks in.

    I'm doing a couple of 1.5 inch London broils this way in about 45 minutes: they've been marinating in a mixture of cold coffee, soy sauce, molasses, sambal and garlic since about noon. Sear for about 45 seconds per side, finish in 500-degree oven until they're medium rare. (And you can try the flesh test all you want, but honestly, nothing beats an instant-read digital thermometer.) Let rest for about ten minutes, slice thin across the grain and serve.

    Sides: fresh corn from our share in a local organic farm, stripped and sauteed in a touch of oilve oil in a cast iron wok with a twig of rosemary and a pinch of kosher salt, plus a fresh green salad of lettuces, radishes, green pepper, cukes and tomatoes (all from the farm as well) dotted with some nice buttermilk blue cheese from the cheese shop down the street. Dessert: blueberry-peach cobbler with fruit from the farm.
    #27
    Julia I
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    RE: Pan Fried Steaks 2003/08/11 00:25:40 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by Jason Perlow

    ooh, thats a toughie. Those kinds of ranges arent really equipped to use cast iron pans, you'll totally ruin the surface and potentially crack it.


    I don't know, we recently bought a glass-topped range and we use cast iron on it all of the time. Our only problem was that our favorite pan had developed a sag in the bottom after decades of use that prevented it from sitting flat on the glass. We found a nicely seasoned "new" (from a rummage sale) cast iron pan with a flat bottom and have had no problems with it.
    #28
    VibrationGuy
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    RE: Pan Fried Steaks 2003/08/11 14:12:52 (permalink)
    Yeah, I wouldn't see a problem with cast iron on smoothtop, either. I've used it with great success on glass-top induction surfaces before, and I don't think radiant or halogen should be a big struggle, either. Lodge has a new line of "pre-seasoned" cast iron that a lot of people seem to be raving about.

    Eric
    #29
    Rustywolf
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    RE: Pan Fried Steaks 2004/03/08 15:10:23 (permalink)
    Hello, Folks!

    I really shouldn't be giving this information away, because my steaks are the best anyone's acccording to anyone who's enjoyed them. But what the hey! I've so enjoyed this friendly website. Sterns, thank you for so much fun.

    1) Marinate the rib-eyes or porterhouses (the cuts I use) of your choice in Lea & Perrins Worchestershire Sauce at room temperature. Poke 'em full of holes and then douse 'em. Cut through the fat rings on the meat in several places so the steaks won't curl up.

    2) Melt a little butter along with a little olive oil in your well-seasoned (please understand the term!) cast iron skillet. Swirl it around. When it's good and smoking, gently place the steaks in the skillet. Throw open the windows and put your kitchen fan on high.

    3) Scorch until done to your taste — it doesn't take long. The crust on these steaks will rival anything you will ever get at a steakhouse. Just be sure the steaks aren't super thick.

    4) Take steaks out and let them rest. Then lower the heat somewhat, and deglaze the skillet with a few splashes of sweet Jewish-sounding dessert wine, a dollop of red current jelly and some butter. When it starts to bubble, scrape up the bits on the bottom with a spatula until the bottom is smooth again.

    5) Thrown in big slices of mushrooms or onions or both and let them soak up the pan juices until they soften. Ladle over the steaks or onto baked potatoes.

    6) If you've done this right, your pan should clean up as easy as if it was Teflon.

    Bon Appetite, Baby!

    - Rusty


    #30
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