LockedPhilly Cheesesteak

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TrentonDog
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Re:Philly Cheesesteak variations 2010/08/27 16:42:21 (permalink)
Davydd

So the Philly Cheesesteak may evolve some more with Swiss, Gouda and maybe some quality cheeses. 

 
I wouldn't get too carried away, after all, it is Philly we're talking about. And if you think about it, the invention of Cheez Whiz and its widespread use on the Philly cheesesteak caused the sandwich to regress. But, it is what it is............. (no processed Swiss!)
 
 
 
 

 
Bruce Bilmes and Susan Boyle
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Re:Philly Cheesesteak variations 2010/08/27 16:43:48 (permalink)
As it's been evolving, and will continue to evolve.  As you point out, cheesesteaks were invented decades before Whiz.  But that's not all.  Chicken cheesesteaks have been very popular in the Delaware Valley for many years.  Who'da figured that?  And the way I see it, those huge, hash-like cheesesteaks are more popular now than the old-fashioned kind with chewy flaps of meat.  So popular, in fact, that I'd guess most fans think the finely chopped version is the "real" way it's done.

On the other hand, it's food, not a history class - I figure people should eat 'em however they like 'em.  Mayo?  Sure!  Dill pickle chips?  Go for it!
TrentonDog
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Re:Philly Cheesesteak variations 2010/08/27 17:08:50 (permalink)
Bruce Bilmes and Susan Boyle

As it's been evolving, and will continue to evolve.  As you point out, cheesesteaks were invented decades before Whiz.  But that's not all.  Chicken cheesesteaks have been very popular in the Delaware Valley for many years.  Who'da figured that?  And the way I see it, those huge, hash-like cheesesteaks are more popular now than the old-fashioned kind with chewy flaps of meat.  So popular, in fact, that I'd guess most fans think the finely chopped version is the "real" way it's done.

On the other hand, it's food, not a history class - I figure people should eat 'em however they like 'em.  Mayo?  Sure!  Dill pickle chips?  Go for it!

Pat's in Philly slices their ribeye paper thin, and I like theirs better than Geno's who slices their meat thicker. (the "flaps of meat") My wife eats chicken cheese steaks, and everywhere we get them, the meat is chopped and formed and frozen a-la "steak-umms". Not my cup of tea! Maybe if they took partially frozen fresh chicken and sliced it razor thin it would make a better sandwich. To make up for the dryness of the chicken, the cook will throw some grease on the griddle. So if people eat a chicken cheese steak to be healthy, they are fooling themselves. (same goes for chicken and turkey hot dogs, ham, etc. - all loaded with fat so they taste good)
 
So eat 'em how you like 'em, but if you put Swiss on a cheese steak, you can't call it a Philly. If it is popular in Oregon, call it a Oregon cheese steak.
 
 
 
 
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Re:Philly Cheesesteak variations 2010/08/27 17:43:20 (permalink)
Once a dish goes national its birthplace loses all control over it.  One day someone will start putting, say, avocado and ranch on "Philly cheesesteaks," people will love it so much that it will become the "right" way coast to coast, and the whole world will know that a true Philly cheesesteak always has avocado and ranch.  I imagine when Whiz found its way on the sandwich the same complaints were heard.

Edit to add: I've still never tried a chicken cheesesteak.  Doubt I ever will.  One of my pet peeves is chicken showing up where it doesn't belong, like on a Caesar salad or a pizza.  But that's just me.
post edited by Bruce Bilmes and Susan Boyle - 2010/08/27 17:47:25
Davydd
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Re:Philly Cheesesteak variations 2010/08/27 18:53:14 (permalink)
Like I mentioned earlier, I had a Caribou with Gouda Cheesesteak at the Northern Lights Restaurant on the North Shore in Minnesota.  If you don't know, a Cheesesteak type sandwich has pretty much become a staple on most bar/grill/restaurant menus around the country if burgers and other sandwiches are served. Usually a Reuben, chicken breast and some kind of breaded fish sandwich will be served as well. Outside of Philly I rarely see Cheez Whiz or American as an ingredient. They are often referred to as "Philly" cheesesteak sandwiches but not always. Free of traditional Philly constraints the rest of the country may be enjoying a better sandwich ingredients wise.
TrentonDog
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Re:Philly Cheesesteak variations 2010/08/27 18:57:29 (permalink)
Bruce Bilmes and Susan Boyle

Once a dish goes national its birthplace loses all control over it.  One day someone will start putting, say, avocado and ranch on "Philly cheesesteaks," people will love it so much that it will become the "right" way coast to coast, and the whole world will know that a true Philly cheesesteak always has avocado and ranch. 

 
Pretty much doubt that. Look at all of the regional variations of pizza and hot dogs. If avocado and ranch on a cheese steak become very popular in Philadelphia, (fat chance) then that will be accepted. But if an avocado and ranch cheese steak is a best seller in Provincetown, MA - what will it be called?
 
Bruce Bilmes and Susan Boyle
I imagine when Whiz found its way on the sandwich the same complaints were heard.

 
Maybe some people did complain, but the free market worked and instead of going away, it is more popular than American or Provolone! If Cheez Whiz was so bad, Kraft would have stopped making it in 1953. While Provolone is my favorite, I have to tell you that I do order "Whiz wit" (Whiz and onions) on occasion.
 
Bruce Bilmes and Susan Boyle
Edit to add: I've still never tried a chicken cheesesteak.  Doubt I ever will.  One of my pet peeves is chicken showing up where it doesn't belong, like on a Caesar salad or a pizza.  But that's just me.

 
There are a lot of things where poultry doesn't belong. Turkey bacon? Turkey Ham? Turkey Italian Sausage? Chicken franks? YIKES!!!!!!

John Fox
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Re:Philly Cheesesteak variations 2010/08/27 20:04:00 (permalink)
I just pray that bored chefs don't try to do with the cheesesteak what they are attempting to do with hot dogs. "Haute" cheesesteaks anyone? Remember the $69 hot dog? Foie gras and white truffle butter has no place on a hot dog or cheesesteak. But it's probably only a matter of time before some faux chef tries to create one.

I don't think it will fly in Philly just like the idea of a "haute dog" would get you laughed out of New Jersey. Now LA and Manhattan might be a different story.
TrentonDog
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Re:Philly Cheesesteak variations 2010/08/27 21:09:41 (permalink)
John Fox

I just pray that bored chefs don't try to do with the cheesesteak what they are attempting to do with hot dogs. "Haute" cheesesteaks anyone? Remember the $69 hot dog? Foie gras and white truffle butter has no place on a hot dog or cheesesteak. But it's probably only a matter of time before some faux chef tries to create one.
I don't think it will fly in Philly just like the idea of a "haute dog" would get you laughed out of New Jersey. Now LA and Manhattan might be a different story.

On the left coast maybe, since the Swiss, cotija, avocado, bleu combos seem to be welcome there. (us northeasterners just can't think outside the box - lol) Let them enjoy their faux filly's while we enjoy th "real deal", along with authentic Italian hot dogs and NY pizza. They'll never know what the real thing is, and they won't ever know what they're missing just because some faux chef is pawning his/her "interpretation" of the dish and selling it as genuine.
 
Yes - we take our cheese steaks, hot dogs and pizza seriously!
buffetbuster
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Re:Philly Cheesesteak variations 2010/08/27 21:56:13 (permalink)
Bruce Bilmes and Susan Boyle
Edit to add: I've still never tried a chicken cheesesteak.  Doubt I ever will. 
Then you will appreciate this story. 
 
My cousin Johnny might be the ultimate omnivore.  I think he may be part goat, because he eats everything.  Now, he is a plumber and recently sent his young helper out to the local sandwich shop, with explicit instructions.  "Bring me anything, except the chicken cheesesteak."  Of course, the young guy brought back the chicken cheesesteak for Johnny.  I am a little surprised he didn't fire the kid for such a transgression.  His exact words, "Why would anyone put chicken on a cheesesteak?  Those things are nasty!"

TrentonDog
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Re:Philly Cheesesteak variations 2010/08/27 22:14:11 (permalink)
Come to think of it, you get steaks from cows, not from chickens or turkeys. So a "chicken cheese steak" is really just a grilled chicken sandwich with cheese.

____________________________________________

To: Trentondog@XX.com
From: XXXXXXX@XXXXX.com
Re: Authentic Philly Cheese Steak recipe

Hey TD, got your recipe for your authentic Philadelphia Cheese Steak. Decided to try it out tonight, but I didn't have any ribeye to slice razor thin - so I used 93% lean ground sirloin instead. I also didn't have any Cheez Whiz, Provolone or American cheese in the fridge, but I did have some processed Swiss cheese slices. And finally, I could not get to the bakery in time to get some Italian rolls - they were sold out so I used some Wonder bread Hot Dog buns instead.

Let me tell you, that was the frickin' worst sandwich I ever ate in my life. How do you people in the Philadelphia area put up with such crap. Are you trying to kill me or something?

You'll be hearing from my lawyer!

Good day!

XXXXXXXXXX



__________________________________________



Bruce Bilmes and Susan Boyle
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Re:Philly Cheesesteak variations 2010/08/27 22:25:08 (permalink)
John Fox

I just pray that bored chefs don't try to do with the cheesesteak what they are attempting to do with hot dogs. "Haute" cheesesteaks anyone? Remember the $69 hot dog? Foie gras and white truffle butter has no place on a hot dog or cheesesteak. But it's probably only a matter of time before some faux chef tries to create one.

I don't think it will fly in Philly just like the idea of a "haute dog" would get you laughed out of New Jersey. Now LA and Manhattan might be a different story.


Michael Stern recently (a year ago?) wrote about one of those cheesesteaks served in Philly!  I forget where - some high-end steakhouse.  I don't know if he's following this thread, but if he is, I hope he can describe it for us.  All I remember is that it was amazingly expensive, and I think there might have been truffles on it.  He preferred Chink's.
Bruce Bilmes and Susan Boyle
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Re:Philly Cheesesteak variations 2010/08/27 22:34:31 (permalink)
buffetbuster
My cousin Johnny might be the ultimate omnivore.  I think he may be part goat, because he eats everything.  Now, he is a plumber and recently sent his young helper out to the local sandwich shop, with explicit instructions.  "Bring me anything, except the chicken cheesesteak."  Of course, the young guy brought back the chicken cheesesteak for Johnny.  I am a little surprised he didn't fire the kid for such a transgression.  His exact words, "Why would anyone put chicken on a cheesesteak?  Those things are nasty!"

Did he eat it?

I think TrentonDog is right - it was probably invented as a "healthy" alternative to regular cheesesteaks, or maybe to accommodate people who won't eat red meat (I seem to know more and more of them).  Considering what's on a cheesesteak I doubt chicken turns it into a nutrition bomb.
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Re:Philly Cheesesteak variations 2010/08/27 23:17:54 (permalink)
TrentonDog

John Fox

I just pray that bored chefs don't try to do with the cheesesteak what they are attempting to do with hot dogs. "Haute" cheesesteaks anyone? Remember the $69 hot dog? Foie gras and white truffle butter has no place on a hot dog or cheesesteak. But it's probably only a matter of time before some faux chef tries to create one.
I don't think it will fly in Philly just like the idea of a "haute dog" would get you laughed out of New Jersey. Now LA and Manhattan might be a different story.

On the left coast maybe, since the Swiss, cotija, avocado, bleu combos seem to be welcome there. (us northeasterners just can't think outside the box - lol) Let them enjoy their faux filly's while we enjoy th "real deal", along with authentic Italian hot dogs and NY pizza. They'll never know what the real thing is, and they won't ever know what they're missing just because some faux chef is pawning his/her "interpretation" of the dish and selling it as genuine.
 
Yes - we take our cheese steaks, hot dogs and pizza seriously!

T dog, I'm just funnin' ya. 
A sliced steak sandwich with cheese, avocado, and onions is nothing more than a carne asada Torta.
The blue cheese is because that's what our local cheese factory makes, and it is wonderful with beef. 

One guy's quest:
mmm-yoso!!!: La Torta - And the Quest for a Carne Asada Torta

The "Carne Asada" here tasted like thin sliced rib eye or a similiar cut, lightly seasoned, on a nicely toasted roll. I enjoyed the sandwich except for the cheddar cheese; I'd appreciated some other more creamy cheese, maybe provolone or something similiar. Hey a Philly Cheesesteak Torta sounds might good!


cont....

post edited by bill voss - 2010/08/28 09:35:47
John Fox
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Re:Philly Cheesesteak variations 2010/08/28 08:30:23 (permalink)
Bruce Bilmes and Susan Boyle

John Fox

I just pray that bored chefs don't try to do with the cheesesteak what they are attempting to do with hot dogs. "Haute" cheesesteaks anyone? Remember the $69 hot dog? Foie gras and white truffle butter has no place on a hot dog or cheesesteak. But it's probably only a matter of time before some faux chef tries to create one.

I don't think it will fly in Philly just like the idea of a "haute dog" would get you laughed out of New Jersey. Now LA and Manhattan might be a different story.


Michael Stern recently (a year ago?) wrote about one of those cheesesteaks served in Philly!  I forget where - some high-end steakhouse.  I don't know if he's following this thread, but if he is, I hope he can describe it for us.  All I remember is that it was amazingly expensive, and I think there might have been truffles on it.  He preferred Chink's.

 
Michael mentioned the $100 cheesesteak in this thread:   http://www.roadfood.com/Forums/The-69-hot-dog-m601962.aspx

BillyB
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Re:Philly Cheesesteak variations 2010/08/28 09:38:35 (permalink)
The left coast boys put the Philly Cheese Steak on the menu with melted processed swiss/american cheese, we couldn't get them off the grill fast enough. Some times you just have to think outside the box a bit, I would hate to think I would to stick a Canned cheese  (WHIZ) down my customers Throat............. We ask the customer..."Swiss Wit" on a warm crispy Amoroso roll with thin sliced Ribeye............with sauteed onion.....
TrentonDog
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Re:Philly Cheesesteak variations 2010/08/28 12:02:09 (permalink)
bill voss

T dog, I'm just funnin' ya. 
A sliced steak sandwich with cheese, avocado, and onions is nothing more than a carne asada Torta.
The blue cheese is because that's what our local cheese factory makes, and it is wonderful with beef. 

Whew - had me worried there for a while. Sarcasm doesn't transfer well in print sometimes!
 
 
BillyB

.........I would hate to think I would to stick a Canned cheese  (WHIZ) down my customers Throat............. We ask the customer..."Swiss Wit".....

I double dog dare you to come to Philly and ask for a 'Swiss Wit'!
 
 
bartl
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Re:Philly Cheesesteak variations 2010/08/28 14:33:44 (permalink)
Has anybody who is putting down Cheez Whiz ever bothered to look at the ingredients list? And, if they did, do they know what the ingredients are, or do they just assume, "I can't pronounce it, so it must be bad for me?"

Cheez Whiz isn't really all that bad, although Velveeta is somewhat better.

Also, if anybody buys American Cheese, note that most of the big companies no longer make "Pasteurized Process American Cheese Food" (the "food" part is required because they add milk solids to it) and now sell "Pasteurized Process American Cheese PRODUCT." We had Kraft individually wrapped Pasteurized Process American Cheese around here for a while, but I guess people didn't want to spend the $4.50 a pound or so it cost (I prefer individually wrapped, because unwrapped slices seem to refuse into a single block).
Davydd
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Re:Philly Cheesesteak 2010/08/28 15:34:34 (permalink)
Davydd

You all take your Philly Cheesesteaks seriously when you put this on them?

CHEEZ WHIZ - CHEESE DIP - ORIGINAL

Ingredients: WHEY, CANOLA OIL, MILK, MILK PROTEIN CONCENTRATE, MALTODEXTRIN , SODIUM PHOSPHATE, CONTAINS LESS THAN 2% OF WHEY PROTEIN CONCENTRATE, SALT, LACTIC ACID, SODIUM ALGINATE, MUSTARD FLOUR, WORCESTERSHIRE SAUCE (VINEGAR, MOLASSES, CORN SYRUP, WATER, SALT, CARAMEL COLOR, GARLIC POWDER, SUGAR, SPICES, TAMARIND, NATURAL FLAVOR), SORBIC ACID AS A PRESERVATIVE, MILKFAT, CHEESE CULTURE, OLEORESIN PAPRIKA (COLOR), ANNATTO (COLOR), NATURAL FLAVOR, ENZYMES.

Makes me seriously question what the buns and meat truly are as well.


Yes, earlier in this thread Cheez Whiz was covered. Needless to say it is not cheese. Whether you like the taste or not is another issue. We have a generation now that prefers margarine to butter, so there is no accounting for taste.
TrentonDog
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Re:Philly Cheesesteak 2010/08/28 15:43:22 (permalink)
I am not a food snob. I eat spray cheese on crackers with canned smoked oysters as a snack. So what exactly is "real" cheese? Scientifically speaking, it is bacteria poop, isn't it? Milk, Milk protein concentrate, and maltodextrin sound pretty good compared to bacteria poop.

And as far as the Cheez Whiz haters go, read the link below and weep when you find out that Cheez Whiz was the FIRST cheese to be put on a Philly steak to make a Philly cheese steak. Right from the mouth of the person that invented it.
 
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=5573992

Cheez Whiz = Authentic

Case closed!
post edited by TrentonDog - 2010/08/28 15:44:32
Bruce Bilmes and Susan Boyle
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Re:Philly Cheesesteak 2010/08/28 17:18:32 (permalink)
TrentonDog
And as far as the Cheez Whiz haters go, read the link below and weep when you find out that Cheez Whiz was the FIRST cheese to be put on a Philly steak to make a Philly cheese steak. Right from the mouth of the person that invented it.
 
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=5573992

Cheez Whiz = Authentic

Case closed!


Very interesting!  But not so fast.  He's essentially saying that the Philly steak sandwich was invented decades before the Philly cheesesteak sandwich, since Cheez Whiz was invented in the 1950s.

Yet, the very same Frank Olivieri, in a 2008 Philadelphia Magazine interview (edit to add: http://www.phillymag.com/...sesteak_cometh/page1), said this: "The cheese really came up in the ’40s out at the Pat’s on Ridge Avenue. The first cheese was a provolone cheese. We had a manager named Joe Lorenza, or Cocky Joe. He was always drunk, completely inebriated. A waste of our time. But he was the first person to put cheese on the sandwich"

In that same interview, the subject of chopped versus sliced meat is addressed by Joey Vento of Geno's: "I’ve never changed my sandwich. So even with that guy across the street [Pat's], I think I’m more authentic than he is. He changed. His meat’s different now. He’s into the chopped-meat thing. But the Philly steak needs to be really thinly sliced rib eye. That’s how it started out."  I've always maintained that hacking the meat up is a nouveau approach to the cheesesteak, for prissy diners who get a case of the vapors when confronted by chewy beef.
post edited by Bruce Bilmes and Susan Boyle - 2010/08/28 17:21:21
BillyB
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Re:Philly Cheesesteak 2010/08/28 19:06:08 (permalink)
Cheesesteak From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 
name(s) Philadelphia cheesesteak, Philly cheesesteak Place of origin United States Region or state Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Creator(s) Pat & Harry Olivieri Dish details Course served Main course Serving temperature Hot Main ingredient(s) Sliced steak, cheese, bread Variations Multiple A cheesesteak, also known as a Philadelphia cheesesteak, Philly cheesesteak, or steak and cheese, is a sandwich made from thinly sliced pieces of steak and melted cheese in a long roll. The cheesesteak is one of the favorite foods of the city of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.[1]

looks like the main ingredients are Sliced steak, cheese, Bread...

Case closed  
 




















 


 

post edited by BillyB - 2010/08/28 20:12:53
Foodbme
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Re:Philly Cheesesteak 2010/08/28 19:40:26 (permalink)
BillyB

name(s) Philadelphia cheesesteak, Philly cheesesteak Place of origin United States Region or state Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Creator(s) Pat & Harry Olivieri Dish details Course served Main course Serving temperature Hot Main ingredient(s) Sliced steak, cheese, bread Variations Multiple A cheesesteak, also known as a Philadelphia cheesesteak, Philly cheesesteak, or steak and cheese, is a sandwich made from thinly sliced pieces of steak and melted cheese in a long roll. The cheesesteak is one of the favorite foods of the city of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.[1]

looks like the main ingredients are Sliced steak, cheese, Bread...

Case closed


What's your source of this info. No Footnote or Bibliography----no validity!  
 English 101 basic rule # 63
TrentonDog
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Re:Philly Cheesesteak 2010/08/29 01:19:47 (permalink)
BillyB

Cheesesteak

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Citing Wikipedia - LOL! That'll earn you an "F" in middle school. Good try though. Thanks for playing.
 
 
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Re:Philly Cheesesteak 2010/08/29 09:05:48 (permalink)
Bruce Bilmes and Susan Boyle

Very interesting!  But not so fast.  He's essentially saying that the Philly steak sandwich was invented decades before the Philly cheesesteak sandwich, since Cheez Whiz was invented in the 1950s.

Yet, the very same Frank Olivieri, in a 2008 Philadelphia Magazine interview (edit to add: http://www.phillymag.com/articles/the_cheesesteak_cometh/page1), said this: "The cheese really came up in the ’40s out at the Pat’s on Ridge Avenue. The first cheese was a provolone cheese. We had a manager named Joe Lorenza, or Cocky Joe. He was always drunk, completely inebriated. A waste of our time. But he was the first person to put cheese on the sandwich" ...........

It looks like the great Philly cheesesteak controversy will continue.
 
Maybe Frank tells the different versions on purpose just to keep food forum people busy debating each other.
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Re:Philly Cheesesteak 2010/08/29 09:32:42 (permalink)
I've spoken to Frank Oliveri many times, as well as other long-time steak shop owners in the Philly area. Believe it or not, there seems to be a common fact expressed by each of them about the addition of cheese to a steak sandwich: it didn't happen until the 1940's. So, for about 10 to 15 years it was only known as a steak sandwich.
Provolone and American were the first cheeses added (seems to be dependent upon Philadelphia neighborhood. In other words, provolone was used in the Italian neighborhoods, American in the others.).

By the 1950's, Pat's was establishing itself as the leader because of multiple locations in Philadelphia (South Philly, West Philly, Strawberry Mansion). A Kraft salesman presented the new Cheez Whiz product to the Oliveris and sold them on the idea of cutting down on the time it took to make a cheesesteak. With heated Cheez Whiz, you could apply it to the steak sandwich and voila!, a cheesesteak in about 4 seconds additional time than a plain steak sandwich.

Pat's was the first to use Cheez Whiz on a steak sandwich. This is the fact that other steak shop owners agree on.


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Re:Philly Cheesesteak 2010/08/29 13:26:25 (permalink)
One thing for sure is that if you make a Cheese Steak w/ Tex Mex Cheese Wiz it is a Texas Cheese Steak. Or is it a Texas Style Philly Cheese Steak? Oh well, never mind about tha "for sure" deal. *&^#@

But oh, was there once a "spicy" Cheese Wiz?
Joe
post edited by PapaJoe8 - 2010/08/29 15:02:37
Michael Hoffman
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Re:Philly Cheesesteak 2010/08/29 13:44:29 (permalink)
CheeseWit

I've spoken to Frank Oliveri many times, as well as other long-time steak shop owners in the Philly area. Believe it or not, there seems to be a common fact expressed by each of them about the addition of cheese to a steak sandwich: it didn't happen until the 1940's. So, for about 10 to 15 years it was only known as a steak sandwich.
Provolone and American were the first cheeses added (seems to be dependent upon Philadelphia neighborhood. In other words, provolone was used in the Italian neighborhoods, American in the others.).

By the 1950's, Pat's was establishing itself as the leader because of multiple locations in Philadelphia (South Philly, West Philly, Strawberry Mansion). A Kraft salesman presented the new Cheez Whiz product to the Oliveris and sold them on the idea of cutting down on the time it took to make a cheesesteak. With heated Cheez Whiz, you could apply it to the steak sandwich and voila!, a cheesesteak in about 4 seconds additional time than a plain steak sandwich.

Pat's was the first to use Cheez Whiz on a steak sandwich. This is the fact that other steak shop owners agree on.

Very interesting. Thanks. You're my go-to expert on this subject.

Davydd
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Re:Philly Cheesesteak 2010/08/29 14:55:43 (permalink)
Michael Hoffman

CheeseWit

I've spoken to Frank Oliveri many times, as well as other long-time steak shop owners in the Philly area. Believe it or not, there seems to be a common fact expressed by each of them about the addition of cheese to a steak sandwich: it didn't happen until the 1940's. So, for about 10 to 15 years it was only known as a steak sandwich.
Provolone and American were the first cheeses added (seems to be dependent upon Philadelphia neighborhood. In other words, provolone was used in the Italian neighborhoods, American in the others.).

By the 1950's, Pat's was establishing itself as the leader because of multiple locations in Philadelphia (South Philly, West Philly, Strawberry Mansion). A Kraft salesman presented the new Cheez Whiz product to the Oliveris and sold them on the idea of cutting down on the time it took to make a cheesesteak. With heated Cheez Whiz, you could apply it to the steak sandwich and voila!, a cheesesteak in about 4 seconds additional time than a plain steak sandwich.

Pat's was the first to use Cheez Whiz on a steak sandwich. This is the fact that other steak shop owners agree on.

Very interesting. Thanks. You're my go-to expert on this subject.


Very true the interesting part. Cheez Whiz is 58 years old now. We grew up with it - the modern food. I think maybe oleo predated it. Anything else?

The history of foods and origination have often gone into the ether of debate. It seems the cheesesteak has more solid documentation. The basis of the cheesesteak is spreading around the country with local interpretations. If the cheesesteak is on the menu with the traditional ingredients most bar/grill/restaurants might say "Philly" but often will only use the "cheesesteak" word if derivative with say Swiss or gouda. I've now had cheesesteak sandwiches with bison and caribou. I have also had cheesesteak sandwiches with mozzarella cheese. I haven't had chicken though I have seen it.
Michael Hoffman
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Re:Philly Cheesesteak 2010/08/29 15:54:22 (permalink)
Oleo certainly predates it. I remember oleomargerine (In Connecticut then oleo came in a bag with a color bead. The oleo was white and you had to break the bead and squeeze the bag to mix in the color.) when I was a little kid, and that was long before 1953 when Cheese Whiz first hit the market.
CheeseWit
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Re:Philly Cheesesteak 2010/08/29 16:18:32 (permalink)
One thing I forgot to mention was the fact that Pat's locations were busy and any time that could be saved equaled more customers served. Cheez Whiz was incorporated into the recipe as a time saver.

Cheez Whiz (or similar products) has been added to the offerings in steak shops far and wide because of the success of Pat's. It's by no means a better ingredient. When I go to Pat's, I'll get a cheese wit (wonder why I chose that screenname here) - Cheez Whiz with fried onions. Most other places I'll get it with American or the way it's made by the shop I'm in.

If a restaurant someplace wants to use Gouda or Cheddar or Swiss or whatever and call it a Philly or a Philly Cheesesteak, so be it. I've tried them in hundreds of restaurants and shops across the country and it's a sandwich that can customized or regionalized.

There are a few things I personally won't put on it: mustard or Miracle Whip or Limburger.
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