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 Pot Stickers

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Sundancer7

Pot Stickers Thu, 01/18/07 5:28 PM (permalink)
The Mayor brought up an interesting point regarding Pot Stickers. I have had them before and I always enjoyed. When I read some remarks from Al, I wanted some and tried to buy them here in Houston but i could not find them.

I sorta wondered what makes them different from the dumplings you buy at the sushi place, the egg rolls and whatever. The taste is certainly different. I will bet some on this forum knows. I will bet Al knows also.

Paul E. Smith
Knoxville, TN
 
#1
    mayor al

    • Total Posts: 15059
    • Joined: 8/20/2002
    • Location: Louisville area, Southern Indiana
    • Roadfood Insider
    RE: Pot Stickers Thu, 01/18/07 6:01 PM (permalink)

    Paul,
    Sorry to let you down but my first experience with Pot Stickers has been the large bag we got at Costco over the holidays. They are pretty good, but I prefer good eggrolls, Wontons, or maybe Tacquitos (going into another ethnic area).
     
    #2
      Sundancer7

      RE: Pot Stickers Thu, 01/18/07 6:22 PM (permalink)
      I had pot stickers at a local bar in Knoxville and they were super. I have not been able to find them since.

      If anyone can tell me how to get good ones, I would appreciate it.

      Paul E. Smith
      Knoxville, TN
       
      #3
        EdSails

        • Total Posts: 3555
        • Joined: 5/9/2003
        • Location: Mission Viejo, CA
        RE: Pot Stickers Fri, 01/19/07 1:48 AM (permalink)
        The Japanese ones are called gyoza. They are similar----the main thing I've noticed is that the potsticker wrappers tend to be thicker. I think a lot has to do with how they are prepared. I usually brown them in a little oil and then add water (just enough to cover the bottom of the pan). I also add a little soy sauce to it and steam them for maybe 5 minutes. Then I will usually add chopped ginger or a splash of Sriacha or other Asian chili sauce, sometimes szechuan peppercorns ground fine and usually some finely chopped garlic. Another 5 minutes steaming and they are done. Reduce the sauce just a touch if necessary. I've found the Costco ones are best used in soup.
        I've found the best ones at Marukai, a local Japanese version of Costco. This company makes the ones i have in my freezer now------call them and they may be able to direct you to a local dealer.
        O'Tasty Food Inc. #20840;#32654;#39135;#21697; 1-800-953-1229
        O'Tasty Foods Inc.
        Headquarters Location 160 S Hacienda Blvd., Hacienda Heights CA 91745, United States
        (626)330-1229, (626)330-4077 fax

        Here is another distributor that carries both the O'Tasty potstickers and Japanese Gyoza. They also may be able to direct you to a store in your area.
        Golden Country Oriental Food L.L.C
        http://www.goldencountry.com/products.aspx
        Address: 2355 S. Blue Island Ave., Chicago, IL 60608
        Telephone No.: (773) 847-1700
        Fax No.: (773) 847-1717

        E-mail: info@goldencountry.com

         
        #4
          Jimeats

          • Total Posts: 3175
          • Joined: 8/15/2005
          • Location: Ipswich Ma
          RE: Pot Stickers Fri, 01/19/07 8:08 AM (permalink)
          Trader Joe's has a great pot sticker and they don't come in the mega type bags that Costcos has. They are nice and easy to prepare for a late night snack. They also carry a good dipping sauce for them, just add some chives and your all set. Chow Jim
           
          #5
            desertdog

            • Total Posts: 1946
            • Joined: 5/24/2006
            • Location: Scottsdale, AZ
            RE: Pot Stickers Fri, 01/19/07 8:23 AM (permalink)
            Second the motion on TJ's Pot Stickers. We have them 2-3 times a month, they are the best we've tried.
             
            #6
              V960

              • Total Posts: 2429
              • Joined: 6/17/2005
              • Location: Kannapolis area, NC
              RE: Pot Stickers Fri, 01/19/07 5:18 PM (permalink)
              Folks you can make a boat load of stickers in have them on the table in less than thirty minutes.

              1/4 # groung meat (pick your fav)
              chopped green onions
              garlic powder
              bit of soya sauce
              bit of oyster sauce
              mix and seal in wrappers

              heat veg oil and brown ONE side of stickers w/o touching for three minutes

              add 1/2 cup h2o, cover and steam for three more minutes

              dip in soya
              or hoisin
              or sweet chili sauce
              whatever.
               
              #7
                BT

                • Total Posts: 3589
                • Joined: 7/3/2004
                • Location: San Francisco, CA
                RE: Pot Stickers Fri, 01/19/07 6:51 PM (permalink)
                quote:
                Originally posted by Sundancer7

                The Mayor brought up an interesting point regarding Pot Stickers. I have had them before and I always enjoyed. When I read some remarks from Al, I wanted some and tried to buy them here in Houston but i could not find them.

                I sorta wondered what makes them different from the dumplings you buy at the sushi place, the egg rolls and whatever. The taste is certainly different. I will bet some on this forum knows. I will bet Al knows also.

                Paul E. Smith
                Knoxville, TN


                There is actually quite a variety of dumpling-type foods in Asian cuisine and I've never run across any two that were quite the same. As EdSails says, the ones at a "sushi place" are the Japanese version called gyoza and tend to be smaller with slightly thinner wrappings (this isn't always true). Chinese ones, called (I think) kuo-teh, can be either fried (the classic "pot-sticker") or steamed. Similar but differently shaped are such Chinese things as siu-mai.

                To fry them, I usually do it like EdSails--a little oil in a pan and fry for a minute or two, then add maybe 1/4 cup water and cover, cooking about 15 minutes. Then I remove the lid and keep cooking until the water evaporates and they are frying again and get properly browned.

                To honest, I've never had frozen store-bought ones (from TJ's or CostCo or wherever) that come close to the best version from a dumpling shop or good restaurant. If you are ever in New York, PLEASE go to The Dumpling House and try theirs (it's on an alley in Chinatown).



                For an alternative feast (that you will crave ever after), go to the Shanghai Dumpling Shp on Balboa St. in SF and get Shanghai "soup dumplings". These have both meat and lots of broth in them, hence the name. They are both different and wonderful.

                 
                #8
                  Rick F.

                  • Total Posts: 1736
                  • Joined: 8/16/2002
                  • Location: Natchitoches, LA
                  RE: Pot Stickers Fri, 01/19/07 7:12 PM (permalink)
                  I enjoy them too. For me the key seems to be the sauce. My guess is that it is soy- or teriyaki-based with added garlic and maybe ginger. Something hot, too, but (for me at least) not too hot.

                  See also http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teriyaki
                   
                  #9
                    Sundancer7

                    RE: Pot Stickers Fri, 01/19/07 8:46 PM (permalink)
                    Rick, it has gotta be the sauce. Without it, everything seems to be the same.

                    I wish I could identify the sauce????

                    Paul E. Smith
                    Knoxville, TN
                     
                    #10
                      curried bluebonnet

                      • Total Posts: 108
                      • Joined: 4/12/2006
                      • Location: the woodlands, TX
                      RE: Pot Stickers Sat, 01/20/07 10:50 AM (permalink)
                      Sundancer,

                      Check the local HEB and other grocery stores--many have potstickers frozen for a quick fix, some even come with sauces. In the ethnic foods aisles you can sometimes find premade sauces as well. Our local Kroger has a little sushi section where they make potstickers fresh for you there. They sell dumpling sauce as well (HEB, too).Can you believe I even found a sauce at Target by Ming Tsai for potstickers!! I live in The Woodlands, just north of Houston. I'm sure you can find some great dumplings and dim sum in Houston, I've not had the chance to do so.

                      I like to make potstickers at home with the premade wonton or eggroll skins found in the organic refrigerated section, by the tofu. I used to use ground pork for the filling, but now use ground turkey as it is a little lighter. I use a little cabbbage as well, chopped green onions, plenty of garlic and chopped ginger, soy sauce, chile paste or oil, sometimes some sherry. No measurements, sorry. Pan fry in a little veg oil, then add water to steam at end.

                      My sauce has soy, little sesame oil, rice wine vinegar, chopped green onions, and chile garlic paste or oil, plus fresh ginger. It is spicy, gingery, and salty. Makes you a tad dehydtrated if you eat too manyso drink lots of water after! We love them around here!
                       
                      #11
                        Sundancer7

                        RE: Pot Stickers Sat, 01/20/07 3:55 PM (permalink)
                        Curried: Thanks for the advice and that sounds very good.

                        The Residence Inn on South Main does not have a lot of variety except if you go to the Fiesta. Krogers next door has the folks that do the sushi and they have dumplings. I guess they are not the same as potstickers.

                        Paul E. Smith
                        Knoxville, TN
                         
                        #12
                          BT

                          • Total Posts: 3589
                          • Joined: 7/3/2004
                          • Location: San Francisco, CA
                          RE: Pot Stickers Sun, 01/21/07 4:00 AM (permalink)
                          quote:
                          Originally posted by Sundancer7

                          Rick, it has gotta be the sauce. Without it, everything seems to be the same.

                          I wish I could identify the sauce????

                          Paul E. Smith
                          Knoxville, TN


                          They are eaten with a wide variety of sauces. In San Francisco, most places do NOT provide a pre-mixed sauce but condiments on the table that include soy sauce, white vinegar and hot chili oil. The standard mix is roughly 50/50 soy/vinegar with a splash of chili oil to taste. If you want to whip up something fancier at home, add some minced garlic and a tiny bit of sugar (I like mine a little sweet)--or use Japanese "seasoned" rice vinegar (which is already sweet) instead of white vinegar. The idea noted above of also adding a bit of minced ginger sounds good too--don't be afraid to experiment.

                          At the Dumpling House in NYC, though, the only condiment provided is Sriracha:



                          and that works well too. It's basically ground red peppers and vinegar.

                          Personally, I would never used a pre-mixed potsticker sauce. When I do get it with my take-out dumplings, it goes in the trash. Much better to mix your own simple sauce as above. Chinese people all do.
                           
                          #13
                            roossy90

                            • Total Posts: 6695
                            • Joined: 8/15/2005
                            • Location: columbus, oh
                            RE: Pot Stickers Sun, 01/21/07 2:12 PM (permalink)
                            I noticed a regional name difference.
                            When I lived in the FL., a few places called them pot stickers.
                            When up north, they were called Peking Dumplings, now here in SC, they are listed as Chinese Dumplings..
                            I love them, no matter what they are called.
                            I usually get them pan fried as opposed to steamed.
                             
                            #14
                              BT

                              • Total Posts: 3589
                              • Joined: 7/3/2004
                              • Location: San Francisco, CA
                              RE: Pot Stickers Mon, 01/22/07 5:35 PM (permalink)
                              quote:
                              Originally posted by roossy90

                              I noticed a regional name difference.
                              When I lived in the FL., a few places called them pot stickers.
                              When up north, they were called Peking Dumplings, now here in SC, they are listed as Chinese Dumplings..
                              I love them, no matter what they are called.
                              I usually get them pan fried as opposed to steamed.



                              The term "pot stickers" really only applies to the fried version. Even in SF where "pot sticker" is used by most people, if you want the steamed version, you have to ask for "steamed dumplings" ("Chinese" is superfluous since you would be in a Chinese restaurant). And in Japanese places, you do need to know that they are "gyoza".
                               
                              #15
                                Sundancer7

                                RE: Pot Stickers Wed, 01/24/07 4:25 PM (permalink)
                                I am a little confused. I am in Lincoln Nebraska at the Marriott downtown. Across the street is a Vietnamese place call NRA TRANGS. I order pot stickers expecting them to be fried and they were really dumplings. They were very good but not what I expected. They were served with a mild hot, sweet, salty, garlicly sauce. Again, they were very good but not what I expected.

                                I may go back to dinner this every and get some General Tso's chicken. Marriott indicated that the place was very good???


                                Paul E. Smith
                                Knoxville, TN
                                 
                                #16
                                  heavy liquid

                                  • Total Posts: 27
                                  • Joined: 1/23/2007
                                  • Location: Farmington, MI
                                  RE: Pot Stickers Wed, 01/24/07 6:37 PM (permalink)
                                  The Wikipedia entry on dumplings is excellent in describing the differences in dumplings between the main Japanese, Chinese and Korean versions:

                                  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gyoza

                                  I personally love gyoza best (Japanese pan-fried dumplings, dipped in the special gyoza sauce). But I'll never turn down a good dumpling. Chinese, Korean, it's all good!
                                   
                                  #17
                                    roossy90

                                    • Total Posts: 6695
                                    • Joined: 8/15/2005
                                    • Location: columbus, oh
                                    RE: Pot Stickers Wed, 01/24/07 9:10 PM (permalink)
                                    When I lived in Mass, the chick from the local Chinese restaurant would always go to Boston and bring us back bags of frozen Gyoza..
                                    In fact, I brought some back to Florida when I drove back, had a cooler that I kept re-icing to keep them totally frozen.
                                    And on the sauce, My thoughts were that some type of hoisen sauce was used.
                                    Am I wrong on that?
                                    I know there was ginger in it.
                                    All I know is that I love the sauce.

                                     
                                    #18
                                      BT

                                      • Total Posts: 3589
                                      • Joined: 7/3/2004
                                      • Location: San Francisco, CA
                                      RE: Pot Stickers Thu, 01/25/07 2:05 AM (permalink)
                                      quote:
                                      Originally posted by Sundancer7

                                      I am a little confused. I am in Lincoln Nebraska at the Marriott downtown. Across the street is a Vietnamese place call NRA TRANGS. I order pot stickers expecting them to be fried and they were really dumplings. They were very good but not what I expected. They were served with a mild hot, sweet, salty, garlicly sauce. Again, they were very good but not what I expected.

                                      I may go back to dinner this every and get some General Tso's chicken. Marriott indicated that the place was very good???


                                      Paul E. Smith
                                      Knoxville, TN


                                      Frankly, both "potstickers" and General Tso's chicken are things you wouldn't find on the menu of a Vietnames resturant in a community where there were a lot of Vietnamese customers--because they aren't Vietnamese. "General Tso's Chicken" is Chinese and my suspicion is it's actually Chinese-American (that is, I doubt you'd actually find it on any menu in China but I'm not sure about that). "Potstickers" are also Chinese although, as we have been discussing, there's a Japanese version. But they tend to be found in more northern climes than Vietnam because the wrappers are wheat-based, not rice-based.

                                      Vietnam, though, like other southeast Asian countries, has a large ethnic Chinese population. The folks running your restaurant may be ethnic Chinese Vietnamese or they may be Vietnamese who simply think there wouldn't be enough customers in the heartland for pure Vietnamese food. In Tucson, it's also the case that most restaurants are sort of pan-Asian. Regardless of what they claim to be, they have the Chinese standards (including potstickers) for people, who don't really know what Vietnamese (for example) food is. But in the Bay Area, for example, Vietnamese is Vietnamese--only.

                                      Anyway, all this is by way of saying that what's called a "dumpling" or "potsticker" can be expected to vary a lot because the culinary background of the people preparing and serving them varies a lot. I wouldn't really know what to expect in a Vietnamese restaurant serving "Chinese" food.

                                      One more time on the sauce: It can be anything you want it to be but "mild hot, sweet, salty, garlicy" sounds like it could be essentially what I described as "my" usual recipe: vinegar, soy, hot chili oil, minced garlic and a pinch of sugar. In a Vietnamese place, though, the "salty" component might include some fish sauce. really, you can eat them with whatever you like (but pure hoisin is a little too "yucky" for my taste).
                                       
                                      #19
                                        rebeltruce

                                        • Total Posts: 698
                                        • Joined: 9/8/2006
                                        • Location: Culpeper, VA
                                        RE: Pot Stickers Thu, 01/25/07 9:39 AM (permalink)
                                        I make my own at home also. Everything from scratch.

                                        I'll dig out my old Frugal Gourmet, cook book, that's where my recipe comes from, and will post the entire recipe.

                                        The dough is very easy to make, and you'll have enough for a huge number of dumplings!
                                         
                                        #20
                                          mland520

                                          • Total Posts: 485
                                          • Joined: 9/8/2006
                                          • Location: Dallas, TX
                                          RE: Pot Stickers Thu, 01/25/07 10:09 AM (permalink)
                                          not to stick nose in where not wanted- but this past week end on AMerica's Test Kitchen (on local PBS) there was an outstanding recipe for pot stickers-
                                          using ground pork, napa (chopped fine) and fresh ginger and fish sauce and some soya sauce. Actual recipe can be found on their web site.
                                          They suggested placing in round wrappers (Japanese)as they are a little thinner than a traditional won ton wrapper.
                                          Placed in non stick saute pan- with a little oil- cooked until brown on that one side- then added H2O and steamed until water evaporated.
                                          They looked fantastic.
                                           
                                          #21
                                            rebeltruce

                                            • Total Posts: 698
                                            • Joined: 9/8/2006
                                            • Location: Culpeper, VA
                                            RE: Pot Stickers Thu, 01/25/07 10:34 AM (permalink)
                                            quote:
                                            Originally posted by mland520


                                            Placed in non stick saute pan- with a little oil- cooked until brown on that one side- then added H2O and steamed until water evaporated.
                                            They looked fantastic.



                                            Mine are cooked in the same way, the difference being that I use chicken stock for the steaming portion of the cooking.

                                            Fry in peanut oil until the bottoms are nice and crispy, then add 3/4 cup or so of chicken stock leave heat high, cover and let them steam until the liquid is absorbed, then re-crisp them a bit before serving.
                                             
                                            #22
                                              mland520

                                              • Total Posts: 485
                                              • Joined: 9/8/2006
                                              • Location: Dallas, TX
                                              RE: Pot Stickers Thu, 01/25/07 4:46 PM (permalink)
                                              What follows is the exact recipe from America's Test Kitchen-
                                              ENJOY! Found it on their website.

                                              Potstickers

                                              from the Episode: Not Your Average Stir-Fry

                                              We prefer to use gyoza wrappers. You can substitute wonton wrappers, but the cooking time and recipe yield will vary (see the chart below Step 3). Potstickers are best served hot from the skillet; we recommend that you serve the first batch immediately, then cook the second batch. To freeze potstickers, place filled, uncooked dumplings in the freezer in a single layer on a plate until frozen, then transfer to a storage bag. There's no need to thaw frozen potstickers; just proceed with the recipe.

                                              Makes 24 dumplings, 6 first course servings
                                              Filling

                                              3 cups minced napa cabbage leaves
                                              3/4 teaspoon table salt
                                              3/4 pound ground pork
                                              6 tablespoons minced scallions (about 4 medium scallions, white and green parts)
                                              1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper
                                              4 teaspoons soy sauce
                                              1 1/2 teaspoons grated fresh ginger
                                              1 medium clove garlic , minced or pressed through garlic press (about 1 teaspoon)
                                              2 egg whites , lightly beaten



                                              24 gyoza wrappers , round, (see note above)
                                              4 teaspoons vegetable oil



                                              1. Toss cabbage and salt in colander or mesh strainer set over medium bowl. Let stand until cabbage begins to wilt, about 20 minutes; press cabbage gently with rubber spatula to squeeze out excess moisture. Combine cabbage and all other filling ingredients in medium bowl and mix thoroughly. Cover bowl with plastic wrap and refrigerate until mixture is cold, at least 30 minutes and up to 24 hours.

                                              2. Place 4 wrappers flat on work surface (keep remaining wrappers covered with plastic wrap). Following illustration 1, above, place one slightly rounded tablespoon filling in center of each wrapper. Using pastry brush or fingertip, moisten edge of wrapper with water. Fold each wrapper in half; starting in center and working toward outside edges, pinch edges together firmly to seal, pressing out any air pockets (illustrations 2 and 3). Position each dumpling on its side and gently flatten, pressing down on seam to make sure it lies flat against work surface (illustration 4). Repeat to form 24 dumplings. (Filled dumplings can be refrigerated overnight in single layer on baking sheet wrapped tightly with plastic wrap.)

                                              3. Add 2 teaspoons oil to 12-inch nonstick skillet and quickly spread oil with paper towel to distribute evenly. Arrange 12 dumplings in skillet, lying flat on one side, with all seams facing same direction, overlapping just slightly, if necessary. Place skillet over medium-high heat and cook, without moving, until dumplings are golden brown on bottoms, about 5 minutes. Reduce heat to low, add 1/2 cup water to skillet, and cover immediately. Cook, covered, until most of water is absorbed and wrappers are slightly translucent, about 10 minutes. Uncover skillet and increase heat to medium-high; cook, without stirring, until dumpling bottoms are well browned and crisp, 3 to 4 minutes more. Turn off burner and slide dumplings from skillet onto double layer paper towels, browned side down, to blot excess oil. Transfer to platter and serve immediately with Scallion Dipping Sauce (see related recipe). Let skillet cool until just warm, then wipe skillet clean and repeat with remaining dumplings and oil.

                                              Choosing the Right Wrap
                                              Tasters preferred the slightly chewy texture of gyoza-style wrappers to thinner wonton wrappers, but both styles produced terrific potstickers. Although we developed our recipe using round wrappers, square or rectangular wrappers can be used as well. Here's how to adjust filling amount and steaming time. Because the smaller wrappers yield more dumplings, you'll need to cook them in multiple batches. (For wrapping instructions, see instructions below.)

                                              WRAPPER
                                              Round gyoza (3 3/4 inches diameter), fill with 1 rounded tablespoon, steam for 10 minutes
                                              Round wonton (3 3/4 inches diameter), fill with 1 rounded tablespoon, steam for 6 minutes
                                              Square wonton (3 3/8 inches square), fill with 2 rounded teaspoons, steam for 6 minutes
                                              Rectangular wonton (3 1/4 inches by 2 3/4 inches), fill with 1 rounded teaspoon, steam for 5 minutes





                                              Step-by-Step: Wrapping Potstickers

                                              1. FILL: Place rounded tablespoon of filling in center of gyoza wrapper.
                                              2. FOLD: After moistening edge of wrapper, fold it in half to make half-moon shape.

                                              3. PINCH: With forefinger and thumb, pinch dumpling closed, pressing out any air pockets.
                                              4. FLATTEN: Place dumpling on its side and press gently to flatten bottom.


                                               
                                              #23
                                                xannie_01

                                                • Total Posts: 1481
                                                • Joined: 10/18/2005
                                                • Location: albuquerque, NM
                                                RE: Pot Stickers Thu, 01/25/07 4:56 PM (permalink)
                                                i am never going to lose weight if i keep reading these posts.
                                                 
                                                #24
                                                  roossy90

                                                  • Total Posts: 6695
                                                  • Joined: 8/15/2005
                                                  • Location: columbus, oh
                                                  RE: Pot Stickers Thu, 01/25/07 6:54 PM (permalink)
                                                  Where's the recipe for the dipping sauce?
                                                   
                                                  #25
                                                    Sundancer7

                                                    RE: Pot Stickers Thu, 01/25/07 8:48 PM (permalink)
                                                    The Vietnamese place in Lincoln was definately run by folks from Vietnam. I met them but I assume that the market in Lincoln demands other food than just Vietnamese. It was located directly across the street from the Marriott.

                                                    Paul E. Smith
                                                    Knoxville, TN
                                                     
                                                    #26
                                                      MilwFoodlovers

                                                      • Total Posts: 3090
                                                      • Joined: 3/31/2001
                                                      • Location: Milwaukee, WI
                                                      RE: Pot Stickers Sun, 01/28/07 8:06 AM (permalink)
                                                      A tip of the toque goes to mland520 for sharing the pot sticker recipe.
                                                      I'm signed up for advance notice for special's from Aldi's which shares a common parent with Trader Joe's. Starting Feb. 4th they will be selling pork or chicken potstickers for $1.99 for a ten oz. pkg. Since TJ's got such good reviews, does anyone know if they are the same product? The sale starts just before we are to leave on vacation, but I hope to buy some for a treat when we return. If they are the same, I may really stock my freezer up.
                                                      I too vacillate with dipping sauces using nuoc nam, nampla or soy mixed with a little garlic and and chilli's, sometimes adding some fresh grated ginger or minced green onion tops. Other times, a little Sirracha is all I need. I doubt that we have the same thing twice. I love the combination frying one side finishing with steaming; mmm that's good.
                                                       
                                                      #27
                                                        ChopChop

                                                        • Total Posts: 46
                                                        • Joined: 1/4/2007
                                                        • Location: Birmingham, AL
                                                        RE: Pot Stickers Tue, 01/30/07 1:42 AM (permalink)
                                                        There are few things in life as tasty and succulent as a well made pot sticker. The slippery dumpling with that toasty crunch on the bottom. The savory insides complimented by that salty gingery punch of dipping sauce. Little oily pillows of goodness.
                                                         
                                                        #28
                                                          CoastFan

                                                          • Total Posts: 116
                                                          • Joined: 1/23/2005
                                                          • Location: Issaquah, WA
                                                          RE: Pot Stickers Mon, 02/19/07 7:55 PM (permalink)
                                                          As noted by a couple of posters already, gyoza tends to have thinner wrappers than pot stickers. Another difference quite often noticed is that the Chincese pot sticker filling tends to be juicier than the Japanese gyoza. Many chinese cooks place some broth over the meat filling before sealing the wrapper.
                                                           
                                                          #29
                                                            FlippyTheRed

                                                            RE: Pot Stickers Mon, 02/19/07 8:58 PM (permalink)
                                                            I'm a big fan of the TJs Pork Gyoza. Fry some up and mix about 2 parts rice wine vinegar with 1 part soy and have Siriacha standing by. Ginger, scallions, others as available.
                                                             
                                                            #30
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