Potstickers

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carlton pierre
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2004/12/15 14:39:17 (permalink)

Potstickers

Any fans of these Oriental dumplings? I love them, and fortuntely canbuy them at Sam's Club, only place in Knoxville I have found that carries them. Food City carries dumpling sauce, but no dumplings.
I like them boiled or fried, though fried is probably preferable. Anybody else like these little gems?
#1

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    EdSails
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    RE: Potstickers 2004/12/15 14:50:26 (permalink)
    I usually get them at Costco, although in a pinch I'll buy them at Trader Joe's (just as good actualy). I also get them from Marukai, my local Japanese supermarket (and a fun place to shop!). I'll typically fry tem although on occasion I use them in soup. They are delicious!
    #2
    berndog
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    RE: Potstickers 2004/12/15 15:27:05 (permalink)
    Carlton, I love these dumplings as well. I also get them at Sam's Club, although I think these are ground chicken and mostly ground vegetables for filling. Not as good as the ones I get at Chinese restaurants, but pretty good for something you can pull out of the freezer, boil, and then pan fry in a short time.

    For sauce, I use a sweet chili sauce (can't think of the brand) mixed with some soy sauce and a dash of worcestershire. Since I only make a small portion at a time, I don't bother with the sauce packet that comes with the pot stickers.
    #3
    jellybear
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    RE: Potstickers 2004/12/15 15:32:04 (permalink)
    They are ok, and they are made out of ground Chicken.The little pack of sauce is only enough for one person.I really like the Potstickers at TGIFs,I swear they are better than the China Mans.
    #4
    EdSails
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    RE: Potstickers 2004/12/15 15:46:56 (permalink)
    Got me thinking now.....I'm way overdue for going to my favorite Hong Kong style dimsum place, the Great Seafood Palace in Artesia CA. A nice order of potstickers, some roast duck, shrimp dumplings and fried crab claws----yum!
    #5
    BT
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    RE: Potstickers 2004/12/15 16:06:02 (permalink)
    They are ubiquitous in San Francisco and I, too, love them, but actually I like the Japanese version (gyoza) better than the Chinese (kuo-teh). My source of choice: Sapporo-Ya in Japan Center but I've had them in numerous Japanese places and they are nearly always better than all but the exceptional Chinese versions.
    Here in Tucson, of course, pickings are slimmer and I stock up on 'em at TJ's--quite good actually and easy to fix.

    But much of the yumminess of a good potsticker is in the dipping sauce. I usually use about 1/2 and 1/2 good Chinese soy sauce and vinegar, sweeten with a little sugar and add healthy amounts of chopped garlic and hot chile oil.
    #6
    carlton pierre
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    RE: Potstickers 2004/12/15 16:09:42 (permalink)
    I'm learning some things about the sauce I did not know before. Has anyone seen a commercially made sauce or would you stil prefer tomake your own?
    #7
    EdSails
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    RE: Potstickers 2004/12/15 16:27:07 (permalink)
    Most of the sauce packages I've seen with the packaged ones are mediocre. As shown in BT's recipe, it's easy to make it and much more delicious. It also depends----the gyoza use a different sauce than the potstickers evan though the dumplings themselves are basically the same.
    #8
    BT
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    RE: Potstickers 2004/12/15 16:35:58 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by carlton pierre

    I'm learning some things about the sauce I did not know before. Has anyone seen a commercially made sauce or would you stil prefer tomake your own?


    Most commercial sauces I've ever had are gaggogenic and it's SO easy to make your own. In most SF Asian restaurants you will find 3 condiments on every table for this purpose: soy sauce, vinegar and hot chile paste or oil. A simple mixture of the three, in roughly equal proportions, is a SUPERB sauce. One word of caution--you must have an authentic soy sauce. Kikkoman will do (La Choy and Chun King will NOT) but any brand made in Taiwan, China or the Philippines is much better because Japanese soy sauce tastes a little different (still good, but best on Japanese food).
    #9
    zataar
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    RE: Potstickers 2004/12/15 21:35:02 (permalink)
    If doing gyoza, please try to use Yamasa Soy Sauce from Japan. It is far better than Kikkoman and not that hard to find if you have a Japanese/ Korean market in your area.
    #10
    BT
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    RE: Potstickers 2004/12/15 21:55:59 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by zataar

    If doing gyoza, please try to use Yamasa Soy Sauce from Japan. It is far better than Kikkoman and not that hard to find if you have a Japanese/ Korean market in your area.


    I agree with you--I like Yamasa and I mentioned Kikkoman just because that's the only REAL soy sauce available nearly everywhere in the US--but personally I use San-J Tamari (wheat-free) soy sauce with Japanese food. We've discussed this elsewhere, but US brands like La Choy and Chun King are made from a soy protein digest and caramel color. Traditional Asian-made sauces use a fermented combination of soy beans and wheat without artificial flavors and colors. Tamari, from Japan (be careful--there are US-made "health food" brands that aren't made with traditional methods) is made in a simlar way but uses only soy beans in the fermentation and so is more expensive and considered top-of-the-line.

    There are several fairly common Chinese sauces. I usually use either Pearl River Bridge from the mainland or Kimlan from Taiwan. Pearl River bridge in particular makes several grades of both light and dark sauces ("light" soy is NOT "lite" soy which is a thing to be avoided). I recommend Bruce Cost's book "Asian Ingredients" to help sort all this out.
    #11
    zataar
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    RE: Potstickers 2004/12/15 22:07:00 (permalink)
    I use Pearl River Bridge for Chinese, Thai and Vietnamese food, Yamasa for Japanese and Korean. I have used San-J, but it isn't so available in my area. Pearl River Bridge is a wonderful brand for many asian products such as fermented black beans and regular, dark and mushroom soy sauces. I think I'll be making some noodle tomorrow after reading this post.
    #12
    plb
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    RE: Potstickers 2004/12/16 17:40:47 (permalink)
    If you can find them, try lamb and carrot dumplings / potstickers. A little different but very good.
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    Rayme
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    RE: Potstickers 2004/12/16 18:32:25 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by BT

    quote:
    Originally posted by carlton pierre

    I'm learning some things about the sauce I did not know before. Has anyone seen a commercially made sauce or would you stil prefer tomake your own?


    Most commercial sauces I've ever had are gaggogenic and it's SO easy to make your own. In most SF Asian restaurants you will find 3 condiments on every table for this purpose: soy sauce, vinegar and hot chile paste or oil. A simple mixture of the three, in roughly equal proportions, is a SUPERB sauce. One word of caution--you must have an authentic soy sauce. Kikkoman will do (La Choy and Chun King will NOT) but any brand made in Taiwan, China or the Philippines is much better because Japanese soy sauce tastes a little different (still good, but best on Japanese food).

    Gyoza was one of my favorite dishes when I was growing-up. They still are but I've never had any in a restaurant that could match Mom's version and I'm too lazy to make my own. Always ground pork with green onions, egg as binder, and some other secret seasonings. Mom used to make them either pan-fried or deep-fried; I prefer the pan-fried. One of the keys is to use a light wonton skin rather than the doughy things you get in a lot of restaurants. I like gyoza sauce although I don't remember the specific brand. La Yu (chili oil) is also key.
    #14
    redtressed
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    RE: Potstickers 2004/12/16 18:42:21 (permalink)
    A big nod of agreement to the Yamasa andddddddd these are sooooo much better when you make them yourself and a very easy nosh to make.

    Gyoza

    1 lb ground pork
    1/2 lb shrimp
    1 tsp minced garlic
    5 scallions/green onions, minced finely
    3 Tblsp Rice Wine or Sherry
    3 TBLSP Soy Sauce
    1 tsp fresh minced ginger
    1 egg
    3 TBLSP Cornstarch
    1 cup water
    3 cups chicken broth
    Peanut oil
    Gyoza wrappers( or substitute wonton wrappers if gyoza not avaliable)

    Toss Ground pork, shrimp, garlic, green onions, wine, Soy sauce ginger and egg into a food processor or blender and process until well mixed and fairly smooth. on a plate, with the other wrappers covered by a dampened tea towel or paper towel, place one wrapper. and drop a rounded teaspoon of the ground meat mixture in the center. Add the cornstarch to the cup of water and stir until dissolved. Take your finger and dip it in the cornstarch water and wipe the rim of the wrapper. Put ends together forming a half circle(triangle if using won ton skins, and seal..crimping the ends together with small pinches with your fingers. Slightly flatten thebottoms of the Gyoza and set up right on a cookie sheet, keeping the Gyoza covered with the damp towels as you make them. Heat peanut oil in a saute' pan.about 1/4 a cup. Place several gyoza in hot oil...still standing up and fry until slightly browned on the bottoms(make sure gyoza do not touch in pan). After slightly browned, add 1/2 cup of chicken broth and quickly put a tight fitting lid over the pan. Steam gyoza for about 7 minutes..remove to platter and repeat until all are done.

    Dipping Sauce

    1 Cup Yamasa Soy Sauce
    1/2 cup Rice Wine Vinegar
    1/2 cup Sweet Miirin(optional)
    2 tsp Sesame Oil
    2 scallions very finely minced

    Mix all together and refrigerate until ready to use.

    Sweet Miirin will add a bit of a teriyaki effect to the sauce
    #15
    BT
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    RE: Potstickers 2004/12/17 01:23:40 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by redtressed

    Sweet Miirin will add a bit of a teriyaki effect to the sauce


    As with soy sauce, read the label when buying mirin. For starters, there's more than one kind of genuine mirin:

    quote:
    Mirin is sweet alcohol made from mochigome (rice) and komekoji (yeast). It is generally used for cooking only. It is used as a ceremonial drink (otoso) at New Years. There are two types of mirin: hon and shin. Shin mirin has less than 1% alcohol content. It enhances flavor and makes food shiny. It's sweetness is essential to Japanese cooking.


    I'd use (and sometimes do use) the low alcohol stuff in gyoza sauce. But there's also fake mirin on the market--which is essentially sugar water. Nothing wrong with that either--note that the sauce recipe I gave is very similar to Red's except I use a little sugar (or sometimes even cane sugar syrup) in it rather than mirin because (a) not everybody's local market will have mirin and (b) it's the hint of sweetness I want, not the alcohol, anyway. But at least if you are paying for mirin, be sure you aren't getting high-priced sugar water (note--the sugar is often glocose, don't let that fool you--glucose is just a simple sugar).
    #16
    Rayme
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    RE: Potstickers 2004/12/21 20:17:05 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by redtressed

    A big nod of agreement to the Yamasa andddddddd these are sooooo much better when you make them yourself and a very easy nosh to make.

    Gyoza

    1 lb ground pork
    1/2 lb shrimp
    1 tsp minced garlic
    5 scallions/green onions, minced finely
    3 Tblsp Rice Wine or Sherry
    3 TBLSP Soy Sauce
    1 tsp fresh minced ginger
    1 egg
    3 TBLSP Cornstarch
    1 cup water
    3 cups chicken broth
    Peanut oil
    Gyoza wrappers( or substitute wonton wrappers if gyoza not avaliable)

    Toss Ground pork, shrimp, garlic, green onions, wine, Soy sauce ginger and egg into a food processor or blender and process until well mixed and fairly smooth. on a plate, with the other wrappers covered by a dampened tea towel or paper towel, place one wrapper. and drop a rounded teaspoon of the ground meat mixture in the center. Add the cornstarch to the cup of water and stir until dissolved. Take your finger and dip it in the cornstarch water and wipe the rim of the wrapper. Put ends together forming a half circle(triangle if using won ton skins, and seal..crimping the ends together with small pinches with your fingers. Slightly flatten thebottoms of the Gyoza and set up right on a cookie sheet, keeping the Gyoza covered with the damp towels as you make them. Heat peanut oil in a saute' pan.about 1/4 a cup. Place several gyoza in hot oil...still standing up and fry until slightly browned on the bottoms(make sure gyoza do not touch in pan). After slightly browned, add 1/2 cup of chicken broth and quickly put a tight fitting lid over the pan. Steam gyoza for about 7 minutes..remove to platter and repeat until all are done.

    Dipping Sauce

    1 Cup Yamasa Soy Sauce
    1/2 cup Rice Wine Vinegar
    1/2 cup Sweet Miirin(optional)
    2 tsp Sesame Oil
    2 scallions very finely minced

    Mix all together and refrigerate until ready to use.

    Sweet Miirin will add a bit of a teriyaki effect to the sauce

    Wow Redtressed, VERY IMPRESSIVE. I've forgotten about the steaming step which, of course, is critical. I'll have to ask Mom for her recipe but yours sounds very similar. Do you find any difference between Gyoza skins and Wonton skins other than the shape?
    #17
    redtressed
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    RE: Potstickers 2004/12/27 20:07:17 (permalink)
    Rayme, I think the gyoza skins hold up a little better than the wonton skins, by just being a tad thicker.
    #18
    Unknown Cavalier
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    RE: Potstickers 2005/01/08 14:52:19 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by carlton pierre

    Any fans of these Oriental dumplings? I love them, and fortuntely canbuy them at Sam's Club, only place in Knoxville I have found that carries them. Food City carries dumpling sauce, but no dumplings.
    I like them boiled or fried, though fried is probably preferable. Anybody else like these little gems?


    I love them too! They are just so good w/ duck sauce that you get from a Chinese restaurant. Pot Stickers and anything w/ shrimp in it are my favorite things to eat from Chinese cuisine!
    #19
    Michael Hoffman
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    RE: Potstickers 2005/01/08 15:24:53 (permalink)
    I don't think I've ever had potstickers. I'm going to have to fix that hole in my culinary cape.
    #20
    zataar
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    RE: Potstickers 2005/01/08 15:52:35 (permalink)
    My favorite Korean / Japanese market has recently expanded their frozen prepared foods section. The variety of dumplings and pot stickers is mind boggling! All kinds of vegetable ones, some Korean ones with corn that I'm going to try. All kinds of meat ones, some with spinach, some with leeks and one really good one with edadame (soy beans) and garlic. They aren't expensive, which is nice. I agree with BT, asian market soy sauces are a much better choice than grocery store kinds, unless it's kikkomann. It's about the best grocery store brand out there.
    #21
    ericats
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    RE: Potstickers 2005/01/08 16:57:09 (permalink)
    I never would buy frozen or pre-made dumplings because they just don't taste as good as fresh; however, I'm lucky enough to live in So Cal and we have some of the best dim sum places in the world (please note that I didn't say we have the best just some of the best - my favorite place is Dim Sum Go Go in NYC) In Arcadia there is a famous Taiwan branch of a dumpling restaurant, I forget the name, but they have some of the best dumplings in the region (they are very minimalist but oh so good.)

    There are as many dipping sauces as there are dumpling types. The place in Arcadia that I mentioned above gives you a small dish with slivered fresh ginger and then you add soy sauce and black vinegar to taste (they also have some chili oil on the table.) At the old Harbor Village in Monterey Park (no longer there) they used to serve a sauce of watered down red wine vinegar with fresh slivered ginger with the pan fried dumplings. At Empress Pavilion in the old Chinatown/Downtown LA they serve hot mustard and chili garlic paste only - no soy sauce! The most inventive sauces are at Dim Sum Go Go: the first is a ginger/cilantro paste-like concoction, the second is a vinegar/chili sauce, and the third is some type of shredded salty dried beef. Divoon!
    #22
    garykg6
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    RE: Potstickers 2005/01/08 18:48:20 (permalink)
    love em'! steamed or fried are equally good. Carlton,if you have any Korean grocery stores around,ask them for their frozen product,a pleasant suprise awaits. I have tried Sam's club and they are OK,as to sauce,I use either oyster sauce(bottled) or just soy with a bit of vinegar and a taste of sugar.......why do I always get hungry writing these posts?
    #23
    Rayme
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    RE: Potstickers 2005/01/30 12:21:10 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by redtressed

    A big nod of agreement to the Yamasa andddddddd these are sooooo much better when you make them yourself and a very easy nosh to make.

    Gyoza

    1 lb ground pork
    1/2 lb shrimp
    1 tsp minced garlic
    5 scallions/green onions, minced finely
    3 Tblsp Rice Wine or Sherry
    3 TBLSP Soy Sauce
    1 tsp fresh minced ginger
    1 egg
    3 TBLSP Cornstarch
    1 cup water
    3 cups chicken broth
    Peanut oil
    Gyoza wrappers( or substitute wonton wrappers if gyoza not avaliable)

    Toss Ground pork, shrimp, garlic, green onions, wine, Soy sauce ginger and egg into a food processor or blender and process until well mixed and fairly smooth. on a plate, with the other wrappers covered by a dampened tea towel or paper towel, place one wrapper. and drop a rounded teaspoon of the ground meat mixture in the center. Add the cornstarch to the cup of water and stir until dissolved. Take your finger and dip it in the cornstarch water and wipe the rim of the wrapper. Put ends together forming a half circle(triangle if using won ton skins, and seal..crimping the ends together with small pinches with your fingers. Slightly flatten thebottoms of the Gyoza and set up right on a cookie sheet, keeping the Gyoza covered with the damp towels as you make them. Heat peanut oil in a saute' pan.about 1/4 a cup. Place several gyoza in hot oil...still standing up and fry until slightly browned on the bottoms(make sure gyoza do not touch in pan). After slightly browned, add 1/2 cup of chicken broth and quickly put a tight fitting lid over the pan. Steam gyoza for about 7 minutes..remove to platter and repeat until all are done.

    Dipping Sauce

    1 Cup Yamasa Soy Sauce
    1/2 cup Rice Wine Vinegar
    1/2 cup Sweet Miirin(optional)
    2 tsp Sesame Oil
    2 scallions very finely minced

    Mix all together and refrigerate until ready to use.

    Sweet Miirin will add a bit of a teriyaki effect to the sauce


    Redtressed:

    Used your recipe last night - wuz good! Ok, I didn't have shrimp and I forgot the egg and I didn't use cornstarch so some of my gyoza opening up slightly and I just used water to steam them but still good. Thanks!

    Rayme
    #24
    BT
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    RE: Potstickers 2005/01/30 15:14:04 (permalink)
    Much as I love them, I doubt I'll ever go to the trouble to make my own since I find the TJ's frozen ones acceptable, but I do have one suggestion converning the above. For me, the dipping sauce just has to have a little heat. The traditional way this is accomplished is hot chile oil which is easily made (heat 2 cups or so of small red dried chiles in a similar amount of peanut oil until the chiles begin to blacken and smoke; turn off the heat and let the chiles sit in the oil for several days--or forever if you choose) or bought, but you could also use various Asian chile pastes to taste. Rather than the scallions, I usually use minced garlic.
    #25
    ericats
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    RE: Potstickers 2005/01/30 15:34:11 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by BT

    Much as I love them, I doubt I'll ever go to the trouble to make my own since I find the TJ's frozen ones acceptable, but I do have one suggestion converning the above. For me, the dipping sauce just has to have a little heat. The traditional way this is accomplished is hot chile oil which is easily made (heat 2 cups or so of small red dried chiles in a similar amount of peanut oil until the chiles begin to blacken and smoke; turn off the heat and let the chiles sit in the oil for several days--or forever if you choose) or bought, but you could also use various Asian chile pastes to taste. Rather than the scallions, I usually use minced garlic.


    BT, aren't you up in the Bay Area? Yank Sing makes and sells the best chili oil that I've ever tasted; it just has a great flavor as well as being spicy. I too always put chili oil or chili/garlic paste in my dipping sauce.
    #26
    Jennifer_4
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    RE: Potstickers 2005/01/30 15:34:39 (permalink)
    I've found some very good frozen potstickers at my local store, along with some excellent asian noodle broths, which I combine to make a soup to die for.
    #27
    Rayme
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    RE: Potstickers 2005/01/30 16:41:24 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by BT

    Much as I love them, I doubt I'll ever go to the trouble to make my own since I find the TJ's frozen ones acceptable, but I do have one suggestion converning the above. For me, the dipping sauce just has to have a little heat. The traditional way this is accomplished is hot chile oil which is easily made (heat 2 cups or so of small red dried chiles in a similar amount of peanut oil until the chiles begin to blacken and smoke; turn off the heat and let the chiles sit in the oil for several days--or forever if you choose) or bought, but you could also use various Asian chile pastes to taste. Rather than the scallions, I usually use minced garlic.

    Yeah, I always add La-Yu which is a chili oil to my gyoza sauce.
    #28
    BT
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    RE: Potstickers 2005/01/30 16:49:17 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by ericats


    BT, aren't you up in the Bay Area? Yank Sing makes and sells the best chili oil that I've ever tasted; it just has a great flavor as well as being spicy. I too always put chili oil or chili/garlic paste in my dipping sauce.


    From about May 1 until mid-October, you'll find me in SF where I have lived for 23 years, but the last few I have taken to fleeing the winter rains into the Arizona desert (Tucson) where potstickers are hard to find (except frozen at TJ's). The supermarket does sell bottled Asian chili oil and Hy Fong chili/garlic paste, so, being lazy, I usually use one of those, but sometimes I make my own. If you use a good brand of peanut oil as I described (I bring some Lion & Globe along with me from SF), the home-made hot oil is yummy.
    #29
    AndreaB
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    RE: Potstickers 2005/02/03 19:23:59 (permalink)
    The sauce can make 'em or break 'em. But, in terms of the potsticker itself I prefer the ones with a not so doughy wrap and slightly browned. Re the sauce, green onions are a must! Have not tried any from the grocery, but will check them out.

    Andrea
    #30
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