The most memorable local eateries along the highways and back roads of America
Sign In | Register for Free!
Restaurants Recipes Forums EatingTours Merchandise FAQ Maps Insider
Forum Themes:
Welcome !

 Prime Rib Guidance Needed

Change Page: < 12 | Showing page 2 of 2, messages 31 to 48 of 48
Author Message
ann peeples

  • Total Posts: 8317
  • Joined: 5/21/2006
  • Location: West Allis, Wisconsin
RE: Prime Rib Guidance Needed Tue, 10/10/06 9:22 PM (permalink)
Theedge-absolutely right!!!!!!!!!!!!
 
#31
    SurrealGourmet

    • Total Posts: 93
    • Joined: 12/28/2004
    • Location: St Louis, MO
    RE: Prime Rib Guidance Needed Thu, 10/12/06 12:54 PM (permalink)
    Mmmmmmm...prime rib rocks!! I just bought one that I will be doing for my wife's birthday next week. Instead of the usual oven method I will be smoking it in my offset smoker!! I have a question though....I never have done it but will this time....what is the purpose of cutting the meat off the bone and tying it back on?
     
    #32
      Foodbme

      • Total Posts: 9528
      • Joined: 9/1/2006
      • Location: Gilbert, AZ
      RE: Prime Rib Guidance Needed Thu, 10/12/06 1:12 PM (permalink)
      quote:
      Originally posted by SurrealGourmet

      Mmmmmmm...prime rib rocks!! I just bought one that I will be doing for my wife's birthday next week. Instead of the usual oven method I will be smoking it in my offset smoker!! I have a question though....I never have done it but will this time....what is the purpose of cutting the meat off the bone and tying it back on?

      The only reason I know of is that its easier to slice when it's done. I leave mine on the bone because I think you loose more juice if it's off the bone and if you are going to Rotis it, I would definitely leave it on the bone
       
      #33
        sk bob

        • Total Posts: 1801
        • Joined: 12/29/2005
        • Location: South Daytona, FL
        RE: Prime Rib Guidance Needed Thu, 10/12/06 9:46 PM (permalink)
        kosher salt, fresh ground peper, minced garlic rubbed into the cap, cook to 120 onthe instaread. let stand for 15mins.
         
        #34
          ScreamingChicken

          • Total Posts: 4712
          • Joined: 11/5/2004
          • Location: Stoughton, WI
          RE: Prime Rib Guidance Needed Mon, 10/16/06 11:46 AM (permalink)
          quote:
          Originally posted by SurrealGourmet
          what is the purpose of cutting the meat off the bone and tying it back on?
          If the bones are separated from meat prior to cooking it's a great place for the cook to add the seasonings of his or her choice. And I personally have found it easier to do the separation when the beef's raw, in those cases where I'm going to be cutting thinner boneless slices instead of big slabs of meat with the ribs still attached.

          Brad
           
          #35
            Mosca

            • Total Posts: 2929
            • Joined: 5/26/2004
            • Location: Mountain Top, PA
            RE: Prime Rib Guidance Needed Tue, 10/17/06 3:08 PM (permalink)
            I've used Tanyth Tyrr's recipe for years. 250* and a good electric meat thermometer, plan on waiting for it. The only variance I have is that I let the meat in for longer than suggested; internal 120 is still mighty rare. 135 is more like it for me, and I like my meat medium rare.

            http://members.tripod.com/~BayGourmet/primerib.html
             
            #36
              BTB

              • Total Posts: 207
              • Joined: 7/25/2004
              • Location: St. Petersburg, FL
              RE: Prime Rib Guidance Needed Wed, 10/18/06 10:20 AM (permalink)
              Well, I'm sure all the various methods of cooking prime rib (or rib roast) mentioned above all work well for each of the poster, but I have to say that I've never had a great or very good prime rib anytime when I've cooked it throughout the cooking period at a constant 325 degrees or higher. If that worked for some, that's fine, but I've found the results to generally be very mediocre, at least for me.

              Most of the great prime rib restaurants that I've gone to virtually ALL cook prime rib using slow cook methods, of which there are many, and which generally results in a more tender piece of cooked meat. Some of these methods were mentioned above. Putting the prime rib in a very hot oven, say 400 to 500 degrees, and then shutting off the oven either right away or within a short period of time, leaving the roast to slowly cook in a completely closed oven for many hours (do not open the door), is a great, great way to cook prime rib (always use the type of meat thermometer mentioned above -- the kind that Alton Brown uses or as someone above mentioned " . . . a digital probe thermometer . . . the kind that the probe stays in the meat while cooking and there's a wire leading to the temperature readout gizmo."). Afterwards, some put the oven back on low for a little while just before taking the roast out. Alton Brown's method (minus the clay pot) mentioned by some above whereby the roast is cooked at a low 225 degrees (or even lower) and then blasting it at a high temperature at the end for a few minutes is another super way of making a very good prime rib meal. It's worked for me many times.

              Let me tell you about a new way (for me) that I "experimented" with last night for the first time. I had bought a 7.5 lb boneless rib roast from Sam's and cut off a small 3 lb piece to cook for just my wife and myself (vacuum sealed and froze the remainder to a time when our "kids" come over). I warmed up our gas grill using just the one burner on the left side and leaving the other burner on the right side turned off. I put a sea salt, pepper, Essence, and steak seasoning rub all over after letting it get to room temperature, inserted my handy dandy probe wired to the "temperature readout gizmo," put the roast upright on the right side of the grill with the readout gizmo on the grill's side table, closed the cover and put the burner on the left side at the lowest heat setting possible. My grill doesn't have a temperature gauge, but it's not needed because of the thermometer that I used. I cooked the roast to an internal temperature of 145 degrees (which took only about 95 minutes since it was such a small piece), opening the cover only a couple times to turn the roast towards the heated side on the left, took it off the grill and let it rest for about 10 minutes. The outside was nicely browned, the little bit of fat on top was nicely crisp, and the inside after carving was a beautiful pink throughout. Best of all, it was so tender, tasty and soft that it melted in our mouths. With a hot baked potato and a few other sides, we had a very nice meal indeed.

               
              #37
                Foodbme

                • Total Posts: 9528
                • Joined: 9/1/2006
                • Location: Gilbert, AZ
                RE: Prime Rib Guidance Needed Wed, 10/18/06 5:39 PM (permalink)
                quote:
                Originally posted by BTB

                Well, I'm sure all the various methods of cooking prime rib (or rib roast) mentioned above all work well for each of the poster, but I have to say that I've never had a great or very good prime rib anytime when I've cooked it throughout the cooking period at a constant 325 degrees or higher. If that worked for some, that's fine, but I've found the results to generally be very mediocre, at least for me.

                Most of the great prime rib restaurants that I've gone to virtually ALL cook prime rib using slow cook methods, of which there are many, and which generally results in a more tender piece of cooked meat. Some of these methods were mentioned above. Putting the prime rib in a very hot oven, say 400 to 500 degrees, and then shutting off the oven either right away or within a short period of time, leaving the roast to slowly cook in a completely closed oven for many hours (do not open the door), is a great, great way to cook prime rib (always use the type of meat thermometer mentioned above -- the kind that Alton Brown uses or as someone above mentioned " . . . a digital probe thermometer . . . the kind that the probe stays in the meat while cooking and there's a wire leading to the temperature readout gizmo."). Afterwards, some put the oven back on low for a little while just before taking the roast out. Alton Brown's method (minus the clay pot) mentioned by some above whereby the roast is cooked at a low 225 degrees (or even lower) and then blasting it at a high temperature at the end for a few minutes is another super way of making a very good prime rib meal. It's worked for me many times.

                Let me tell you about a new way (for me) that I "experimented" with last night for the first time. I had bought a 7.5 lb boneless rib roast from Sam's and cut off a small 3 lb piece to cook for just my wife and myself (vacuum sealed and froze the remainder to a time when our "kids" come over). I warmed up our gas grill using just the one burner on the left side and leaving the other burner on the right side turned off. I put a sea salt, pepper, Essence, and steak seasoning rub all over after letting it get to room temperature, inserted my handy dandy probe wired to the "temperature readout gizmo," put the roast upright on the right side of the grill with the readout gizmo on the grill's side table, closed the cover and put the burner on the left side at the lowest heat setting possible. My grill doesn't have a temperature gauge, but it's not needed because of the thermometer that I used. I cooked the roast to an internal temperature of 145 degrees (which took only about 95 minutes since it was such a small piece), opening the cover only a couple times to turn the roast towards the heated side on the left, took it off the grill and let it rest for about 10 minutes. The outside was nicely browned, the little bit of fat on top was nicely crisp, and the inside after carving was a beautiful pink throughout. Best of all, it was so tender, tasty and soft that it melted in our mouths. With a hot baked potato and a few other sides, we had a very nice meal indeed.




                Makes Sense! I've always had good success with Hi heat cooking but I think I'll try low & slow. We cook ribs, brisket etc low & slow to get them good and tender-----why not other cuts of meat???
                As David Letterman says"Know your cuts of meat"!
                 
                #38
                  Wendy1987

                  • Total Posts: 1
                  • Joined: 12/27/2007
                  • Location: Orlando, FL
                  RE: Prime Rib Guidance Needed Thu, 12/27/07 10:08 AM (permalink)
                  On this 500 degree, close the door and turn the oven off method for cooking prime rib, aabout how many minutes to the pound does it take, and does this work for boneless as well as bone in roast?
                   
                  #39
                    porkbeaks

                    • Total Posts: 2201
                    • Joined: 5/6/2005
                    • Location: Hoschton/Braselton, GA
                    RE: Prime Rib Guidance Needed Thu, 12/27/07 10:30 AM (permalink)
                    quote:
                    Originally posted by Wendy1987

                    On this 500 degree, close the door and turn the oven off method for cooking prime rib, aabout how many minutes to the pound does it take, and does this work for boneless as well as bone in roast?


                    From cooks.com:

                    Multiply the weight of the meat times 5. This will give you the amount of time to leave it in the oven at 500 degrees.

                    Example: 5 lbs. times 5 equals 25 minutes. Ovens may vary. 5 times the weight gives me medium to medium rare. For medium rare to rare I multiply the weight of the meat by 4.8.

                     
                    #40
                      edwmax

                      • Total Posts: 2013
                      • Joined: 1/1/2007
                      • Location: Cairo, GA
                      RE: Prime Rib Guidance Needed Thu, 12/27/07 11:22 AM (permalink)

                      Does anyone know how the old Steak & Ale did their Prime Ribs? I think it may have been aged & marinated. My memory may be over rating their Prime Rib, but I thought it was the best around in Atlanta and Birmingham in the mid 70's.

                      I've googled but haven't found any reference to Steak & Ale's Prime Rib or copy-cat recipes.
                       
                      #41
                        rjb

                        • Total Posts: 451
                        • Joined: 12/15/2003
                        • Location: Bronxville, NY
                        RE: Prime Rib Guidance Needed Thu, 12/27/07 11:46 AM (permalink)
                        quote:
                        Originally posted by edwmax


                        Does anyone know how the old Steak & Ale did their Prime Ribs? I think it may have been aged & marinated. My memory may be over rating their Prime Rib, but I thought it was the best around in Atlanta and Birmingham in the mid 70's.

                        I've googled but haven't found any reference to Steak & Ale's Prime Rib or copy-cat recipes.

                        Interesting. I worked at a Steak & Ale in Atlanta in the early 70's and don't recall they had prime rib on the menu then. In fact, other than baked potatoes, everything was done on the grill.
                         
                        #42
                          Russ Jackson

                          • Total Posts: 2257
                          • Joined: 11/28/2007
                          • Location: Xenia
                          RE: Prime Rib Guidance Needed Thu, 12/27/07 11:49 AM (permalink)
                          I cooked a 6.5 lb Prime Rib on christmas. I rubbed it down prior with 2 heads of roasted garlic in olive oil and a little raw sugar. I mixed the paste with a rub of onion powder,whole cracked pepper,1/2 of a dried poblano ground,dried jalapeno,kosker salt,and some crushed red pepper,all spices from penzeys. in a 500 degree oven for 15 minutes then to 325 until it reached 120 degrees then let it sit for 20 minutes or longer the internal temp rose to 133 when I cut it just like http://whatscookingamerica.net/Beef/ClassicPrimeRib.htm says.Cooking your meat higher than 120 internally is putting you in danger of destroying a very expensive piece of meat. Remember the 2 ends are going to be medium to medium well while the center will be medium rare. And you could always heat up slices in a cast iron skillet for those who like to kill there meat. Heck hand them a bottle of ketchup to fininh it off. .....Russ
                           
                          #43
                            edwmax

                            • Total Posts: 2013
                            • Joined: 1/1/2007
                            • Location: Cairo, GA
                            RE: Prime Rib Guidance Needed Thu, 12/27/07 10:22 PM (permalink)
                            quote:
                            Originally posted by rjb

                            quote:
                            Originally posted by edwmax


                            Does anyone know how the old Steak & Ale did their Prime Ribs? I think it may have been aged & marinated. My memory may be over rating their Prime Rib, but I thought it was the best around in Atlanta and Birmingham in the mid 70's.

                            I've googled but haven't found any reference to Steak & Ale's Prime Rib or copy-cat recipes.

                            Interesting. I worked at a Steak & Ale in Atlanta in the early 70's and don't recall they had prime rib on the menu then. In fact, other than baked potatoes, everything was done on the grill.


                            From about 1976 to 1980 they did, because it was all I ordered. Prime Rib (rare); bake potato, Mushrooms, and salad bar. The downtown Atlanta Steak & Ale near the Marriott, Marietta at 41 & 285 and the one in Birmingham all had Prime Rib.

                            The only time I ate at the downtown Atlanta Steak & Ale was in 1977.My order was severed, in the low light it look great and nice & rare. But when I took a bite it tasted well done and the second bite was the same. When I forked the steak to lift it, a top layer came off. The cook had plated a well done steak and put a vary thin rare slice on top. I call the waitress & manager. I never went back to that one and I never had a problem with any other Steak & Ale.

                            Rjb ….Do you know how the mushrooms were cooked. I think maybe they were cook in beefstock with onions or onion soup with a little wine? Anyway that’s how I sometime do mushrooms at home.
                             
                            #44
                              MiamiDon

                              RE: Prime Rib Guidance Needed Fri, 12/28/07 7:58 AM (permalink)
                              quote:
                              Originally posted by rjb

                              quote:
                              Originally posted by edwmax


                              Does anyone know how the old Steak & Ale did their Prime Ribs? I think it may have been aged & marinated. My memory may be over rating their Prime Rib, but I thought it was the best around in Atlanta and Birmingham in the mid 70's.

                              I've googled but haven't found any reference to Steak & Ale's Prime Rib or copy-cat recipes.

                              Interesting. I worked at a Steak & Ale in Atlanta in the early 70's and don't recall they had prime rib on the menu then. In fact, other than baked potatoes, everything was done on the grill.


                              Well, it is on the menu now:

                              http://www.steakandale.com/menus_dinner.html
                               
                              #45
                                matilda

                                • Total Posts: 667
                                • Joined: 1/25/2007
                                • Location: Port Royal, SC
                                RE: Prime Rib Guidance Needed Fri, 12/28/07 9:25 AM (permalink)
                                I've eaten at the Greenville, SC Steak & Ale within the past year and it was not good at all.

                                As to the cook trying to pull that "fast one," we are most fortunate that idiots like that aren't an everyday encounter. I try to be nice and consider another's position, but good grief, that's just pathetic.
                                 
                                #46
                                  edwmax

                                  • Total Posts: 2013
                                  • Joined: 1/1/2007
                                  • Location: Cairo, GA
                                  RE: Prime Rib Guidance Needed Fri, 12/28/07 7:51 PM (permalink)
                                  quote:
                                  Originally posted by matilda

                                  I've eaten at the Greenville, SC Steak & Ale within the past year and it was not good at all.

                                  As to the cook trying to pull that "fast one," we are most fortunate that idiots like that aren't an everyday encounter. I try to be nice and consider another's position, but good grief, that's just pathetic.


                                  It's been 30 years since and I still haven't forgotten. The cook had rare steak, he put a thin slice on top of the well done slice. How stupid can a cook be?!
                                   
                                  #47
                                    matilda

                                    • Total Posts: 667
                                    • Joined: 1/25/2007
                                    • Location: Port Royal, SC
                                    RE: Prime Rib Guidance Needed Fri, 12/28/07 8:04 PM (permalink)
                                    quote:
                                    Originally posted by edwmax

                                    quote:
                                    Originally posted by matilda

                                    I've eaten at the Greenville, SC Steak & Ale within the past year and it was not good at all.

                                    As to the cook trying to pull that "fast one," we are most fortunate that idiots like that aren't an everyday encounter. I try to be nice and consider another's position, but good grief, that's just pathetic.


                                    It's been 30 years since and I still haven't forgotten. The cook had rare steak, he put a thin slice on top of the well done slice. How stupid can a cook be?!


                                    Apparently, very.
                                     
                                    #48
                                      Online Bookmarks Sharing: Share/Bookmark
                                      Change Page: < 12 | Showing page 2 of 2, messages 31 to 48 of 48

                                      Jump to:

                                      Current active users

                                      There are 0 members and 1 guests.

                                      Icon Legend and Permission

                                      • New Messages
                                      • No New Messages
                                      • Hot Topic w/ New Messages
                                      • Hot Topic w/o New Messages
                                      • Locked w/ New Messages
                                      • Locked w/o New Messages
                                      • Read Message
                                      • Post New Thread
                                      • Reply to message
                                      • Post New Poll
                                      • Submit Vote
                                      • Post reward post
                                      • Delete my own posts
                                      • Delete my own threads
                                      • Rate post

                                      2000-2014 ASPPlayground.NET Forum Version 3.9
                                      What is Roadfood?  |   Privacy Policy  |   Contact Roadfood.com   Copyright 2011 - Roadfood.com