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 Prime Rib

Change Page: < 123 | Showing page 3 of 3, messages 61 to 85 of 85
Author Message
Bill B.

  • Total Posts: 322
  • Joined: 12/18/2003
  • Location: Columbia, MO
RE: Prime Rib Wed, 11/24/04 12:33 PM (permalink)
Now you've done it. I haven't had a good slab of prime rib THIS YEAR...

But I have fond memories of the Victoria Station in Kansas City. From about 1974 through 1985 or so, it served up some humongous cuts of melt-in-your-mouth prime rib. The Station's Trackowner's Cut holds a special place in my cholesterol-clogged heart.
 
#61
    mayor al

    • Total Posts: 15064
    • Joined: 8/20/2002
    • Location: Louisville area, Southern Indiana
    • Roadfood Insider
    RE: Prime Rib Wed, 11/24/04 12:47 PM (permalink)
    Bill B Yeah, Now you bring back a memory. Victoria Station, with it's fake replica trains-stuff. BUT the Oysters Rockefeller and the Prime Rib- King Cut made one hell of a dinner. We got a bunch of dinner for two coupons when we bought a bunch of blank vhs tapes and made use of them for a long time (back in the early 80's). Never had a bad meal at any of the V S we stopped at.
     
    #62
      wilewil

      • Total Posts: 99
      • Joined: 2/3/2004
      • Location: alexandria, VA
      RE: Prime Rib Wed, 11/24/04 2:26 PM (permalink)
      As of earlier this year VS was still open in Burlington Mass.

      By the way, at least around here the train cars were real not fake. The original one in this area had the cars outside, the last one completely inside the building. Both have been gone for some time.

       
      #63
        hagley

        • Total Posts: 1
        • Joined: 11/25/2004
        • Location: boston, MA
        RE: Prime Rib Thu, 11/25/04 10:24 PM (permalink)
        prime rib refers to the rib section of beef.The misnomer is the prime.when"prime " is used to denote beef is is mistaken to mean u.s.d.a. prime graded beef,which in most cases it is not.only u.s.d.a. graded prime beef is prme beef.If someone tells you yes this is prime beef,ask to see the u.s.d.a. prime stamp on the fat of the meat.It is a federal offense to misrepresent beef as usda prime beef.the federal gov grades all beef to very strict standards. less than 1% of all beef is graded usda prime. exspensive but 2nd to none in flavor and tenderness.
        amh
         
        #64
          mistertawny

          • Total Posts: 49
          • Joined: 9/17/2004
          • Location: Oswego, KS
          RE: Prime Rib Fri, 12/3/04 12:28 PM (permalink)
          I was actually kinda interested in what truly defines a "prime rib" and the differing thoughts here made me do a google search. I'm including my favorite recipe at the bottom too!

          From Hormel:

          A tender cut of beef taken from the rib primal. It is very tender, flavorful, and expensive. Prime rib is basically another name for a beef rib roast. Many people have the mistaken idea that the term "Prime Rib" refers to a roast that is graded "Prime" when actually the name has nothing to do with the grade or quality. Most of the roasts sold in supermarkets that are named "Prime Rib" are graded "Choice". Prime rib roasts that are graded "Prime" are usually available only to restaurants or through a special order with a butcher.

          From cooking-italian-food.com:

          Rib refers to where the cut of meat was taken. The beef rib section contains less connective tissue than other cuts of meat making it one of the more tender cuts. Prime is generally the top or highest grade of meat. It contains the greatest degree of marbling making it juicier and more tender. The grade of meat may not necessarily be "prime" to be called "prime rib roast." With or without the prime grade, prime rib roast is traditionally considered elegant, tender, and juicy. Meat may be purchased as rolled roast, standing rib, boneless, rib-eye, small end, or large end rib roast.

          From foodnetwork.com as quoted from --Copyright (c) 1995 by Barron's Educational Series, from The New Food Lover's Companion, Second Edition, by Sharon Tyler Herbst:

          Definition: The term "prime rib" is often incorrectly used as a label for what is actually a rib roast. Culinarily, the term "prime" actually refers to the highest USDA beef grade. It's only given to the finest beef, hallmarked by even marbling and a creamy layer of fat. Very little prime beef makes it past the better hotels and restaurants or prestige butchers. The best grade of beef generally found in supermarkets is USDA Choice. Therefore, although "prime rib" is how rib roast is often labeled, chances are that it's USDA Choice beef.

          Okay as you can see with a 2 minute Google search (prime rib definition), that prime is a misnomer, it refers to the section not the grade. While I like to think that even a choice grade grade roast can be a "prime" candidate for a great cut of meat.


          Personal favorite way to make a rib roast:

          Whatever size (I prefer about a 6 pounder), first thing is age it carefully at least 4 days before cooking. Foodnetwork.com has instructions, so do quite a few other places. I have aged a roast up to 25 days in a small kegerator I converted to try this.

          I do NOT recommend soaking in anything other than a simple citrus marinade (orange is my preference, and don't worry it doesn't "flavor the roast"). And soaking is a misnomer, no more than about 1 hour. Remeber in aging we are trying to reduce the water in the meat. The citrus breaks down connective tissues for an even more "melty" experience.

          Season to taste, I prefer a simple salt and garlic rub held together with an extra virgin olive oil. Next it's off to the pan.

          I trust you all have a large IRON skillet? Good, get it SUPER HOT, and sear all around the roast. This makes for a crispy crust and leavings in the pan for aujus. Now stick your thermometer probe in. Make sure it's a wired type so you do NOT ever open the oven door until the meat is done.

          No just wait. Read a book, watch tv, go for a walk. Anything but fuss with the roast. It'll cook just fine by itself.


          2 points not given here often enough. Firstly pull the meat 7 to 10 degrees before desired doneness (for medium rare that's about 120 degrees to 123 degrees). It will continue cooking for at least 10 minutes after being removed from the oven. Next and this is the most important thing. Let the meat REST before cutting it. That means wait at least 15 to 20 minutes before cutting it, heck before even moving it. This will result in a JUICY tasty roast.

          If you want to make a quick au jus, here's my shortcut. As soon as the meat is out start reducing about 1 and 1/2 cups red wine in a pan. Include some seasoning to your tast, I like carmelized onions, some canned B&B mushrooms, and a sliced celery stalk. When it's reduced by half, (should be about time to cut the roast too incedentally), cut the roast and take the escaped juices, don't worry it'll still be juicy, and put them in your magic brew. Also scrape the cooking pan for any little bits of magic there and dump it in. I myself will usually trim an excess piece of fat or two from the roast and put it in too.

          Turn up to medium high for about 2 minutes. This is about how long it'll take to get people seated. I also like to add, if available, a few teaspoons of SIZZER steak sauce. Trust me, I have tried other brands, and nothing else works as well. Have the roast presented, while you strain the concoction. If you're a selfish bastich like me you'll stick the strained out stuff on the side of your plate. They are marvelous!

          Viola! A simple PERFECT prime, or should I say standing rib roast.
           
          #65
            mistertawny

            • Total Posts: 49
            • Joined: 9/17/2004
            • Location: Oswego, KS
            RE: Prime Rib Sat, 12/4/04 11:08 AM (permalink)
            Forgot to point out.... Cooking temperature is a thing of debate. I like the "split the difference" approach with a 325 degree oven. Some people swear by a low and slow, and others are the Speedy Gonzales of the food world. Just take whichever approach suits you best. 'Nuff said, EXCELSIOR!
             
            #66
              tiki

              • Total Posts: 4135
              • Joined: 7/7/2003
              • Location: Rentiesville, OK
              RE: Prime Rib Sat, 12/4/04 11:37 AM (permalink)
              quote:
              Originally posted by Bill B.

              Now you've done it. I haven't had a good slab of prime rib THIS YEAR...

              But I have fond memories of the Victoria Station in Kansas City. From about 1974 through 1985 or so, it served up some humongous cuts of melt-in-your-mouth prime rib. The Station's Trackowner's Cut holds a special place in my cholesterol-clogged heart.


              I cooked for Victoria Station in SF---wayyyyyy back--like maybe 1969 0r 70----best chain i ever work in--both the food and the pay!! We sure sold ALOT of prime rib!!! Actually i dont think ive seen any better---in a resteraunt--in a long long time---speically now in chains what with everyone being scared to death of lawsiuts after serving RARE prime rib---i think it scared alot of the Corporates away from Prime rib on the menu.
               
              #67
                tiki

                • Total Posts: 4135
                • Joined: 7/7/2003
                • Location: Rentiesville, OK
                RE: Prime Rib Sat, 12/4/04 11:40 AM (permalink)
                quote:
                Originally posted by tamandmik

                Has anyone ever been to Durgin Park in Boston? I was there once, and the Prime Rib I ordered was memorable. It overhung both sides of the plate. I barely had the appetite to finish it. It stands as my favorite prime rib ever.


                and Indian Pudding for dessert!!!!!--oh clog my arteries and let the blood drip from my teeth! PLEASE!!!!
                 
                #68
                  mayor al

                  • Total Posts: 15064
                  • Joined: 8/20/2002
                  • Location: Louisville area, Southern Indiana
                  • Roadfood Insider
                  RE: Prime Rib Sat, 12/18/04 11:44 PM (permalink)

                  Planning a special Standing Rib Roast for that Christmas Dinner? Our friends up at Jungle Jim's in Cincinnati have some options for you. They list two types of Standing Rib Roasts. Both are being Dry Aged (since Nov. 4th). One is graded USDA Choice at $6.99 a pound, the other is USDA Prime at $9.99 a pound. After all the discussion on this thread It is timely that we notice the difference in the grade and Prices. They also have Whole Tenderloins (Choice) at $10.99 and Fole Gras at $34.99. When we stopped in there in November they had a mountain of Turduchens in the freezer I forget the exact price but $65 seems to be close. I'm not pushing for any of these...For me it will be some Cornish Game Hens and exotic Veggies I think. But for the Beef Eater the choices will get your taste buds activated.
                   
                  #69
                    Bill B.

                    • Total Posts: 322
                    • Joined: 12/18/2003
                    • Location: Columbia, MO
                    RE: Prime Rib Tue, 12/21/04 10:42 AM (permalink)
                    That's a great price for USDA Prime standing rib roast.
                     
                    #70
                      Bayleaf

                      • Total Posts: 1
                      • Joined: 12/24/2004
                      • Location: Minneapolis, MN
                      RE: Prime Rib Fri, 12/24/04 10:39 PM (permalink)
                      I am cooking a 14-1/2 lb. beef ribeye whole lip on. Does anyone know how long to cook it to medium? And temp? Any help would be appreciated.
                       
                      #71
                        nvb

                        • Total Posts: 468
                        • Joined: 12/5/2004
                        • Location: dfhbgmhmy, MN
                        RE: Prime Rib Sat, 12/25/04 10:10 AM (permalink)
                        I cook to 155 and let it rest for 10 minutes.

                        Here's a chart for you: http://www.bbqnfools.com/Chart.htm
                         
                        #72
                          Bill B.

                          • Total Posts: 322
                          • Joined: 12/18/2003
                          • Location: Columbia, MO
                          RE: Prime Rib Sat, 12/25/04 11:51 AM (permalink)
                          Hey, Tiki,

                          Do you remember at what temperature the VS cooked its rib roasts? And did it prep them first with any sort of seasonings on the outsides of the roasts?

                           
                          #73
                            seafarer john

                            RE: Prime Rib Sun, 12/26/04 11:57 AM (permalink)
                            My fishmonger has a connection with a meat wholesaler and has been providing me with my Xmas rib roasts for the past ten years. This year he outdid himself - a five rib roast - 9.4 lbs ($80). The meat was not labeled, but I think it was from the very top of "choice". It was well marbeled but had not been dry aged.

                            We rubbed it with EVOlive oil, dusted it lightly with flour, seasoned it with salt and pepper, poured some pretty bad Pinot Noir left over from Wednesday night's party into the pan along with some garlic cloves and an onion, placed the roast on a rack and popped it into a 450 convection oven for fifteen minutes. Lowered the temperature to 300 and took it out about two and a half hours later at 130. It rested about half hour before slicing
                            (I forgot to take the thermometer probe out and after about ten minutes the internal temp rose to 139 which resulted in a roast just a bit more done than I had intended.) I think the lesson here is that a larger roast will keep cooking longer once removed from the oven. My wife made the gravy from pan drippings, water and wine and a bit of slurry of flour and water and a bit of last minute butter added. My son made the Yorkshire pudding which rose up almost six inches in the pan ! We had mashed potatoes, peas, pureed parsnips, caremalized cippolinis, and a salad of endive, oranges, beets, and toasted almonds on the sides. Dessert was a buche de noel made by the grandchildren. Coffee was the exclusive roast sent to me by my friend Mark (Pogo) in Dallas, Ga. The wine was a California Cabernet.

                            I ought to mention here that at our party on Wednesday we served a Broadbent (Cadiz, KY) precooked country ham that we sliced very thin and it was super! Also had Broadbent sausage and bacon for breakfast this morning. Thanks for the tip about Broadbent from some folks here on Roadfood...

                            Cheers, John
                             
                            #74
                              mayor al

                              • Total Posts: 15064
                              • Joined: 8/20/2002
                              • Location: Louisville area, Southern Indiana
                              • Roadfood Insider
                              RE: Prime Rib Sun, 12/26/04 12:22 PM (permalink)

                              Congratulations, John, You seem to have enjoyed a great dinner, and survived the Holiday in fine style.
                              It is interesting to observe how many of the tips, recipes, and recommendations from folks here seem to enhance our lives when we experiment with them a bit.
                              Now if we can get you "tutored" in digital photography , we will be able to SEE that great menu here on the web !!
                               
                              #75
                                steaklover

                                • Total Posts: 85
                                • Joined: 7/28/2004
                                • Location: Fairfield, CT
                                RE: Prime Rib Sun, 12/26/04 12:32 PM (permalink)
                                quote:
                                Originally posted by seafarer john

                                My fishmonger has a connection with a meat wholesaler and has been providing me with my Xmas rib roasts for the past ten years. This year he outdid himself - a five rib roast - 9.4 lbs ($80). The meat was not labeled, but I think it was from the very top of "choice". It was well marbeled but had not been dry aged.

                                We rubbed it with EVOlive oil, dusted it lightly with flour, seasoned it with salt and pepper, poured some pretty bad Pinot Noir left over from Wednesday night's party into the pan along with some garlic cloves and an onion, placed the roast on a rack and popped it into a 450 convection oven for fifteen minutes. Lowered the temperature to 300 and took it out about two and a half hours later at 130. It rested about half hour before slicing
                                (I forgot to take the thermometer probe out and after about ten minutes the internal temp rose to 139 which resulted in a roast just a bit more done than I had intended.) I think the lesson here is that a larger roast will keep cooking longer once removed from the oven. My wife made the gravy from pan drippings, water and wine and a bit of slurry of flour and water and a bit of last minute butter added. My son made the Yorkshire pudding which rose up almost six inches in the pan ! We had mashed potatoes, peas, pureed parsnips, caremalized cippolinis, and a salad of endive, oranges, beets, and toasted almonds on the sides. Dessert was a buche de noel made by the grandchildren. Coffee was the exclusive roast sent to me by my friend Mark (Pogo) in Dallas, Ga. The wine was a California Cabernet.

                                I ought to mention here that at our party on Wednesday we served a Broadbent (Cadiz, KY) precooked country ham that we sliced very thin and it was super! Also had Broadbent sausage and bacon for breakfast this morning. Thanks for the tip about Broadbent from some folks here on Roadfood...

                                Cheers, John


                                Could you share the recipe for Yorkshire pudding? It sounds fantastic!
                                Thanks
                                 
                                #76
                                  dogmeat

                                  RE: Prime Rib Mon, 12/27/04 6:44 AM (permalink)
                                  Try the following on your next prime rib:quality olive oil with chopped fresh garlic/chopped fresh rosemary/sea salt/fresh cracked black and white pepper/rub the entire rib down including both ends and wrap in saran wrap for a day or two in the fridge. I like to start cooking at around 200 degrees with a preheated oven and finish at 500 for a crispy med rare product. What a great smell in the house!![8D
                                   
                                  #77
                                    seafarer john

                                    RE: Prime Rib Mon, 12/27/04 4:00 PM (permalink)
                                    Yorkshire Pudding: America Cooks, Anne Seranne, p.131.

                                    3/4 C flour
                                    1/2 tsp. salt
                                    3 eggs
                                    1/2 C milk
                                    1/4 C water
                                    1/2 C Roast Beef melted fat (separated from the "dripings")

                                    Preheat oven to 450
                                    Sift together flour and salt
                                    Beat eggs, milk, water together. Gradualy add flour while beating. Beat until the surface bubbles.
                                    Pour beef fat into an 8 inch square baking dish and place in the oven till the fat starts to smoke - 4 or 5 minutes
                                    Pour batter into the pan and bake till risen and puffed and light brown- about 20 minutes.
                                    Cut into squares and serve while hot.

                                    We doubled this recipe and the pan size with no problems.

                                    Cheers, John

                                     
                                    #78
                                      Willly

                                      • Total Posts: 396
                                      • Joined: 7/26/2002
                                      • Location: Westport, CT
                                      RE: Prime Rib Mon, 12/27/04 4:48 PM (permalink)
                                      I brown my ribroast off in a large cast iron pan then cook at 275 until 130-135. The nice thing about the low temp cooking is that a lot of the tough collagen based connective tissue converts to gelatin. The roast also stays nice and pink, but after resting does not exude as much juice as one cooked at a higher temp. Just my experience.

                                       
                                      #79
                                        lmariaschneider

                                        • Total Posts: 10
                                        • Joined: 3/18/2004
                                        • Location: Ligonier, PA
                                        RE: Prime Rib Mon, 12/27/04 5:12 PM (permalink)
                                        I just dry aged a supermarket rib roast at home for our Christmas dinner, and it was incredible! Easy to do -- the roast just sat on a rack in my 40 degree refrigerator, wrapped in a triple layer of cheesecloth, for five days. Unwrap and rewrap after the first 24 hours so the cheesecloth doesn't stick. When ready to cook, I trimmed off the dried out fat from the outside, rubbed the exterior with Penzey's English Prime Rib Rub (salt, ground celery, sugar, Tellicherry black pepper, onion, garlic and arrowroot) and roasted (15 min at 475 degrees, the remainder at 375 degrees).

                                        I'm sure the meat was not prime grade, but it was butter-tender and full of mellow, beefy flavor. Much better than a supermarket roast that was NOT dry-aged. Try it!

                                        Lauren
                                         
                                        #80
                                          Jan R Klincewicz

                                          • Total Posts: 3
                                          • Joined: 8/28/2005
                                          • Location: Merion Station, PA
                                          RE: Prime Rib Mon, 08/29/05 3:00 PM (permalink)
                                          quote:
                                          Originally posted by seafarer john

                                          Rib Dog et.al. : Your history lesson is impressive, but it is just that - History. The modern definition, dating from about 1928 is that Prime Ribs are selected from the USDA graded beef - "Prime Grade".


                                          Whose modern definition is this, besides your own ? So far, I have seen some scholarly research indicating that "Prim Rib" refers to a specific cut, and not a grade. I have seen zero evidence from any "official" source to rebut that version of "history."

                                          The USDA's Institutional Meat Purchase Specifications does not even mention the term "Prime Rib". I cannot find any mention of the term in any American government document regarding the nomenclature of beef cuts. The Canadian government does offer an opinion (and I've seen their cows up pretty close, and they are very similar to our own.)

                                          http://www.inspection.gc.ca/english/fssa/labeti/retdet/bulletins/meavia/nomdese.shtml

                                          According to the Canuck sources : "The term "prime rib" may be used to describe the posterior six ribs (7 to 12 inclusive) of the rib section."

                                          I have posted a request to the Certified Angus folks to weigh in, as they lump all Angus as "at least Choice and some Prime. Leaving things that open means no Angus rib roast could be called "Prime Rib" because they voluntarily waive that granular a grading procedure.

                                          This seems to be a hotly debated topic throughout the beef-eating Internet, and there does not seem to be a definitive answer unless everyone can agree who gets to define the term, Industry Associations, the USDA, etc.

                                          I'm not trying to be a wiseguy, but I don't think it is fair to denigrate someone else's research and opinion without having iron-clad facts to back up one's counter-argument.
                                           
                                          #81
                                            CoastFan

                                            • Total Posts: 116
                                            • Joined: 1/23/2005
                                            • Location: Issaquah, WA
                                            RE: Prime Rib Mon, 09/5/05 8:07 PM (permalink)
                                            The lead post mentioned Jake O'Shaughenessy's in Seattle. They did a great job but neither the original Jake's nor the New jake's in Bellevue Square are still around. Alas.

                                            I enjoyed the Lawry's in Los Angeles. There's a small chain in California called Gulliver's which does a pretty good prime rib. I've been to the location by John Wayne Airport (Orange County) several times and to the Burlingame location (near the San Fran airport) once.

                                            The Capital Grill in Providence, R.I. (the orginal location although it's now a chain) served the biggest hunk of prime rib I ever seen served at a restaurant. Very good.
                                             
                                            #82
                                              beef lover

                                              • Total Posts: 1
                                              • Joined: 12/19/2005
                                              • Location: Erie, KS
                                              RE: Prime Rib Tue, 12/20/05 8:53 AM (permalink)
                                              quote:
                                              Originally posted by mistertawny

                                              I was actually kinda interested in what truly defines a "prime rib" and the differing thoughts here made me do a google search. I'm including my favorite recipe at the bottom too!

                                              From Hormel:

                                              A tender cut of beef taken from the rib primal. It is very tender, flavorful, and expensive. Prime rib is basically another name for a beef rib roast. Many people have the mistaken idea that the term "Prime Rib" refers to a roast that is graded "Prime" when actually the name has nothing to do with the grade or quality. Most of the roasts sold in supermarkets that are named "Prime Rib" are graded "Choice". Prime rib roasts that are graded "Prime" are usually available only to restaurants or through a special order with a butcher.

                                              From cooking-italian-food.com:

                                              Rib refers to where the cut of meat was taken. The beef rib section contains less connective tissue than other cuts of meat making it one of the more tender cuts. Prime is generally the top or highest grade of meat. It contains the greatest degree of marbling making it juicier and more tender. The grade of meat may not necessarily be "prime" to be called "prime rib roast." With or without the prime grade, prime rib roast is traditionally considered elegant, tender, and juicy. Meat may be purchased as rolled roast, standing rib, boneless, rib-eye, small end, or large end rib roast.

                                              From foodnetwork.com as quoted from --Copyright (c) 1995 by Barron's Educational Series, from The New Food Lover's Companion, Second Edition, by Sharon Tyler Herbst:

                                              Definition: The term "prime rib" is often incorrectly used as a label for what is actually a rib roast. Culinarily, the term "prime" actually refers to the highest USDA beef grade. It's only given to the finest beef, hallmarked by even marbling and a creamy layer of fat. Very little prime beef makes it past the better hotels and restaurants or prestige butchers. The best grade of beef generally found in supermarkets is USDA Choice. Therefore, although "prime rib" is how rib roast is often labeled, chances are that it's USDA Choice beef.

                                              Okay as you can see with a 2 minute Google search (prime rib definition), that prime is a misnomer, it refers to the section not the grade. While I like to think that even a choice grade grade roast can be a "prime" candidate for a great cut of meat.


                                              Personal favorite way to make a rib roast:

                                              Whatever size (I prefer about a 6 pounder), first thing is age it carefully at least 4 days before cooking. Foodnetwork.com has instructions, so do quite a few other places. I have aged a roast up to 25 days in a small kegerator I converted to try this.

                                              I do NOT recommend soaking in anything other than a simple citrus marinade (orange is my preference, and don't worry it doesn't "flavor the roast"). And soaking is a misnomer, no more than about 1 hour. Remeber in aging we are trying to reduce the water in the meat. The citrus breaks down connective tissues for an even more "melty" experience.

                                              Season to taste, I prefer a simple salt and garlic rub held together with an extra virgin olive oil. Next it's off to the pan.

                                              I trust you all have a large IRON skillet? Good, get it SUPER HOT, and sear all around the roast. This makes for a crispy crust and leavings in the pan for aujus. Now stick your thermometer probe in. Make sure it's a wired type so you do NOT ever open the oven door until the meat is done.

                                              No just wait. Read a book, watch tv, go for a walk. Anything but fuss with the roast. It'll cook just fine by itself.


                                              2 points not given here often enough. Firstly pull the meat 7 to 10 degrees before desired doneness (for medium rare that's about 120 degrees to 123 degrees). It will continue cooking for at least 10 minutes after being removed from the oven. Next and this is the most important thing. Let the meat REST before cutting it. That means wait at least 15 to 20 minutes before cutting it, heck before even moving it. This will result in a JUICY tasty roast.

                                              If you want to make a quick au jus, here's my shortcut. As soon as the meat is out start reducing about 1 and 1/2 cups red wine in a pan. Include some seasoning to your tast, I like carmelized onions, some canned B&B mushrooms, and a sliced celery stalk. When it's reduced by half, (should be about time to cut the roast too incedentally), cut the roast and take the escaped juices, don't worry it'll still be juicy, and put them in your magic brew. Also scrape the cooking pan for any little bits of magic there and dump it in. I myself will usually trim an excess piece of fat or two from the roast and put it in too.

                                              Turn up to medium high for about 2 minutes. This is about how long it'll take to get people seated. I also like to add, if available, a few teaspoons of SIZZER steak sauce. Trust me, I have tried other brands, and nothing else works as well. Have the roast presented, while you strain the concoction. If you're a selfish bastich like me you'll stick the strained out stuff on the side of your plate. They are marvelous!

                                              Viola! A simple PERFECT prime, or should I say standing rib roast.

                                               
                                              #83
                                                shellj

                                                • Total Posts: 1
                                                • Joined: 12/28/2005
                                                • Location: tustin, CA
                                                RE: Prime Rib Wed, 12/28/05 2:53 PM (permalink)
                                                I have a great hint for you lovers of true Prime Rib. On Fridays and Saturdays Mortons has real Prime Rib. You have to call ahead of time to order it. They usually only have about three to four full roast a night. You can order end middel any cut you want. It weighs about 30oz and is about one and half inches thick. I ask them just before they bring it out to put fresh garlic and burn it in. I can tell you the meat melts in your mouth.
                                                 
                                                #84
                                                  Catracks

                                                  • Total Posts: 196
                                                  • Joined: 6/24/2003
                                                  • Location: Southern, CA
                                                  RE: Prime Rib Thu, 01/19/06 3:36 PM (permalink)
                                                  Daemons in Glendale California.

                                                  The place is tiki and has been there since the 40s. The Maitais will knock you on your behind. The best prime rib is a 3 inch thick, rare side o' cow on a plate.

                                                  The potato is a garnish.
                                                   
                                                  #85
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