Regional food north/south; east/west

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2013/09/16 18:36:11 (permalink)

Regional food north/south; east/west

Not sure this Q belongs here, but it is the closest to Regional foods. 
 
My Q is: what states have more than one food tradition in different regions (usually North/SOuth). For example, cooking and local specialties are really different in upstate NY and NYC. Virginia also has variations, from crab cakes on the shore to BBQ more inland and then Shenandoah Valley. PA, too, with Philadelphia on one end, Pittsburg on the other (EAst/West). On the other hand, in New Mexico (which is much larger than NY, VA or PA) the food is fairly consistent throughout the state. (Meaning that the size of the state isn't that important).
 
What other states have very different foods in different locales?
 
#1

19 Replies Related Threads

    Davebassman
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    Re:Regional food north/south; east/west 2013/09/17 11:15:52 (permalink)
    North Carolina is known for it's two styles of barbecue.
     
    Eastern Carolina barbecue is slow cooked "whole hog", minced with a vinegar-based sauce.

    Western Carolina (Lexington -style) usually cooks pork shoulder (as opposed to the whole hog) and the sauce, while still vinegar-based, is a bit more red than the eastern style.
     
    NOTE: There are a LOT of folks on this site that are knowlegable about Carolina barbecue and can provide more details and accurate info about the two styles of Carolina barbecue.....I just know that both styles are delicious!.........
     
    #2
    buffetbuster
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    Re:Regional food north/south; east/west 2013/09/24 08:41:44 (permalink)
    This is a good topic that should have received plenty of responses.....
     
    Well, you sure aren't going to find such St. Louis specialties as gooey butter cake, slingers and St. Paul sandwiches in Kansas City.  And burnt ends are much harder to find in St. Louis. 
    #3
    brisketboy
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    Re:Regional food north/south; east/west 2013/09/24 08:53:14 (permalink)
    A very thought provoking question. In the southwest region Mexican dishes seem to vary from state to state.
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    wanderingjew
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    Re:Regional food north/south; east/west 2013/09/24 09:07:48 (permalink)
    Even here in Rhode Island, the smallest state in the Union. you will find Jonnycakes confined to the West Bay and East Bay Region in the southern part of the state. Meat Pies are almost non existent outside of Northern Rhode Island and Dynamite Sandwiches just don't exist outside of Woonsocket in Northern Rhode Island
    #5
    pineyhill
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    Re:Regional food north/south; east/west 2013/09/24 10:51:55 (permalink)
    Pastie, seems to be an Upper Peninsula(MI) thing, though it seems to have some origins in Cornwall, England.
     
    Can't forget fried cheese curds as mostly a Wisconsin thing.
    post edited by pineyhill - 2013/09/24 10:54:04
    #6
    ScreamingChicken
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    Re:Regional food north/south; east/west 2013/09/24 11:55:26 (permalink)
    Pasties are also quite popular in southwest Wisconsin.  In the middle of the 19th century a lot of the lead miners in the region were Cornish immigrants and they brought the pasty over with them.
    #7
    mayor al
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    Re:Regional food north/south; east/west 2013/09/24 13:25:25 (permalink)
    Just using BB's favorite food---P I E , one can almost draw a map with Pie Specialties matching State or Regional borders. 
     
    Huckleberry seems to focus on Idaho, while MarionBerry is an Oregon favorite.  The Chess or Sugar-creme pies seem to be readily available in the Mid-Atlantic/MidWest where There are (or have been) Amish or Mennonite population centers.
     
    Today when one thinks of Banana Cream Pie or Pudding, we tend to look to the South...Same for Sweet Potato Pie...but change only the main ingredient (sweet potato) to Squash or Pumpkin and we return to the New England origins.
     
    The Fried Pies of OK and Arkansas are another regional offshoot...more a question of 'style' rather than 'flavor'.
    Molasses as a flavoring in Pie seems more common in the NE region.  I love Indian Pudding..the Cornmeal/molasses"Pilgrim' food. We make a Squash pie (minus the crust) recipe that comes close to the old-cornmeal in both flavor and consistency.
     
    It is kinda fun to smple the different versions of a simple item like PIE and trace it's roots to the geographic area of it's creation.
     
    One doesn't see much fresh BOYSENBERRY Pie outside of SoCal. Although the Berry farms are disappearing rapidly...so the sources may migrate to Oregon faster than our tracing can follow them.
    #8
    wanderingjew
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    Re:Regional food north/south; east/west 2013/09/24 13:52:16 (permalink)
    mayor al

    Just using BB's favorite food---P I E , one can almost draw a map with Pie Specialties matching State or Regional borders. 

    Huckleberry seems to focus on Idaho, while MarionBerry is an Oregon favorite.  The Chess or Sugar-creme pies seem to be readily available in the Mid-Atlantic/MidWest where There are (or have been) Amish or Mennonite population centers.

    Today when one thinks of Banana Cream Pie or Pudding, we tend to look to the South...Same for Sweet Potato Pie...but change only the main ingredient (sweet potato) to Squash or Pumpkin and we return to the New England origins.

    The Fried Pies of OK and Arkansas are another regional offshoot...more a question of 'style' rather than 'flavor'.
    Molasses as a flavoring in Pie seems more common in the NE region.  I love Indian Pudding..the Cornmeal/molasses"Pilgrim' food. We make a Squash pie (minus the crust) recipe that comes close to the old-cornmeal in both flavor and consistency.

    It is kinda fun to smple the different versions of a simple item like PIE and trace it's roots to the geographic area of it's creation.

    One doesn't see much fresh BOYSENBERRY Pie outside of SoCal. Although the Berry farms are disappearing rapidly...so the sources may migrate to Oregon faster than our tracing can follow them.

     
    Can't forget Lutefisk Pie in Minnesota !

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    Michael Hoffman
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    Re:Regional food north/south; east/west 2013/09/24 14:15:01 (permalink)
    Next to banana cream pie and pumpkin pie, lutefisk pie is my favorite. For some reason the local Kroger stopped carrying the Mrs. Smith's and Sara Lee lutefisk pies in the frozen section.
    #10
    wanderingjew
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    Re:Regional food north/south; east/west 2013/09/24 15:02:17 (permalink)
    Michael Hoffman

    Next to banana cream pie and pumpkin pie, lutefisk pie is my favorite. For some reason the local Kroger stopped carrying the Mrs. Smith's and Sara Lee lutefisk pies in the frozen section.


    I heard that these two folks have it readily available
     

     
     
    #11
    Michael Hoffman
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    Re:Regional food north/south; east/west 2013/09/24 15:31:56 (permalink)
    I called Ingebretsen's, but they don't ship until colder months "because of the possibility of spoilage."
    #12
    Pancho
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    Re:Regional food north/south; east/west 2013/09/24 16:28:03 (permalink)
    wanderingjew

    Even here in Rhode Island, the smallest state in the Union. you will find Jonnycakes confined to the West Bay and East Bay Region in the southern part of the state. Meat Pies are almost non existent outside of Northern Rhode Island and Dynamite Sandwiches just don't exist outside of Woonsocket in Northern Rhode Island
    Re: Rhode Island regional foods...I've never had "South County Chowder" anywhere but in Rhode Island. As you well know,  delicious clear broth loaded with chunks of clams.

    #13
    wanderingjew
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    Re:Regional food north/south; east/west 2013/09/24 18:00:17 (permalink)
    Pancho

    wanderingjew

    Even here in Rhode Island, the smallest state in the Union. you will find Jonnycakes confined to the West Bay and East Bay Region in the southern part of the state. Meat Pies are almost non existent outside of Northern Rhode Island and Dynamite Sandwiches just don't exist outside of Woonsocket in Northern Rhode Island
    Re: Rhode Island regional foods...I've never had "South County Chowder" anywhere but in Rhode Island. As you well know,  delicious clear broth loaded with chunks of clams.

     
    I've seen it southeastern MA (Fall River and New Bedford) as well as along  the Southeastern CT shore line  (I just had a fabulous rendition at Ford's Lobster in Noank) but you're correct that "South County" is the hub of this delicious soup of marine creatures in a bowl.
    #14
    3 Olives
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    Re:Regional food north/south; east/west 2013/09/24 18:32:35 (permalink)
    Davebassman

    North Carolina is known for it's two styles of barbecue.

    Eastern Carolina barbecue is slow cooked "whole hog", minced with a vinegar-based sauce.

    Western Carolina (Lexington -style) usually cooks pork shoulder (as opposed to the whole hog) and the sauce, while still vinegar-based, is a bit more red than the eastern style.

    NOTE: There are a LOT of folks on this site that are knowlegable about Carolina barbecue and can provide more details and accurate info about the two styles of Carolina barbecue.....I just know that both styles are delicious!.........



    I think you are pretty accurate in a general description. The big thing is October begins BBQ season for churchs, volunteer fire departments, schools, and other nonprofits cooking barbecue as a fundraiser. There's a lot of good barbecue out there!
    #15
    Louis
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    Re:Regional food north/south; east/west 2013/09/24 19:31:54 (permalink)
    Here in northwestern Kentucky the specialty is barbecued mutton, which is mainly served in three counties.  Try finding that anywhere else.
     
    And in my county (Henderson) there are a couple of places that serve fried chicken that is immersed in a sort of brine solution for 24 hours before serving, giving it a salty flavor that penetrates to the bone.  I don't know if this sort of preparation is replicated elsewhere or not.  I've not heard of it, but maybe others can correct me on this.
     
    post edited by Louis - 2013/09/24 19:38:36
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    Pancho
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    Re:Regional food north/south; east/west 2013/09/24 20:04:16 (permalink)
    Louis

    Here in northwestern Kentucky the specialty is barbecued mutton, which is mainly served in three counties.  Try finding that anywhere else.

    And in my county (Henderson) there are a couple of places that serve fried chicken that is immersed in a sort of brine solution for 24 hours before serving, giving it a salty flavor that penetrates to the bone.  I don't know if this sort of preparation is replicated elsewhere or not.  I've not heard of it, but maybe others can correct me on this.

    Yep...been to the Moonlite in Owensboro many times for the mutton. Also the hometown of the motorcycle racing Hayden brothers. Speaking of that chicken there is a variety called "Cornell Chicken" in NY state that sounds similar to your description.
    http://americanfood.about...ell_Chicken_Recipe.htm
    #17
    ann peeples
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    Re:Regional food north/south; east/west 2013/09/25 09:17:52 (permalink)
    Every restaurant, corner store and grocery store here in Milwaukee have a Friday night fish fry. It is a ritual. While which fish is fried, its usually cod, lake perch or walleye. It used to be haddock, as well, but that is few and far between-we miss that!
    #18
    Pancho
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    Re:Regional food north/south; east/west 2013/09/25 11:09:33 (permalink)
    ann peeples

    Every restaurant, corner store and grocery store here in Milwaukee have a Friday night fish fry. It is a ritual. While which fish is fried, its usually cod, lake perch or walleye. It used to be haddock, as well, but that is few and far between-we miss that!
    Very true and we frequent them all the time. Funny story...while out in Montana with my daughter last year we drove by a little tavern/restaurant with a billboard out front. It read on the top line....WI FI....the next line down said this...Fish Fry. My daughter pipes up and says, "Dad, they are having a Wisconsin Fish Fry!"
                                                                      
    post edited by Pancho - 2013/09/25 11:11:26
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    steveindurham3
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    Re:Regional food north/south; east/west 2013/09/25 14:00:04 (permalink)
    Here are some that I thought of:
    Alamance County, NC cheese dogs (Burlington, NC)
    Cheese Dogs (no meat but a block of cheese instead of the meat) - served with mustard, chili and onions (slaw optional)
     
    West Virginia - pepperoni rolls
     
    South Carolina - BBQ Hash (Pig Parts - usually pig organs served on rice).
     
     
     
     
    #20
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