Restaurant of the Day

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Rusty246
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2004/02/24 10:18:50 (permalink)

Restaurant of the Day

Does this not look delicious!? What I would give to try one of these hot oil pizzas! Fat chance down here though. Any ideas on how to make the "hot oil"? We do know someone who owns a pizza place where we live and I would like to get them to try to make this type of pizza. Also, we just had a place open that makes "brick oven" pizza. How does this differ from other pizza places? Is it still cooked on/in a pan?
#1

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    Kristi S.
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    RE: Restaurant of the Day 2004/02/24 10:57:37 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by Rusty246

    Does this not look delicious!? What I would give to try one of these hot oil pizzas!


    I echo your sentiments, Rusty. I even considered licking the screen at first sight of that pizza.
    #2
    Grampy
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    RE: Restaurant of the Day 2004/02/24 10:58:09 (permalink)
    You can buy chili oil in a number of stores, but make sure it is not with sesame oil. As for myself, I take a number of dried hot chilies, crack them so they will be permeable, and place them in a small bottle of olive oil for a couple of weeks. You can use it after a few days, but I like a kick. You can also cheat and use a couple of drops of Dave's Insanity in olive oil to your heat preference. I always have hot oil for pizza and certain pastas.
    #3
    Michael Stern
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    RE: Restaurant of the Day 2004/02/24 10:59:33 (permalink)
    Thanks for your question about the hot oil: a great excuse to return to the Colony and try to find out (not that I expect they'll tell me). The big selling point of a brick oven, from what I've heard, is that the masonry construction radiates an even heat, creating crunchy but slightly chewy crusts (on all kinds of bread as well as pizza). I think it would defeat the point to cook a pizza in a pan in a brick oven. The idea is that the dough is in contact with the stone (and with oil seepage from previous pizzas, one hopes!).
    #4
    Grampy
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    RE: Restaurant of the Day 2004/02/24 11:00:57 (permalink)
    Regarding brick oven pizza, it is just that. Some are gas fired, but the best are wood fired. It is so hot, sometimes around 900°, that the dough sears as soon as it hits the oven floor. I have pizza stones, which serve the same end. See the homemade pizza thread for more advice.
    #5
    Michael Hoffman
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    RE: Restaurant of the Day 2004/02/24 11:08:54 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by Rusty246

    Does this not look delicious!? What I would give to try one of these hot oil pizzas! Fat chance down here though. Any ideas on how to make the "hot oil"? We do know someone who owns a pizza place where we live and I would like to get them to try to make this type of pizza. Also, we just had a place open that makes "brick oven" pizza. How does this differ from other pizza places? Is it still cooked on/in a pan?

    I just add some dried, crushed, red chilis to olive oil and let them steep in the refrigerator for a week or two. Then I strain the oil through cheesecloth and use it for lots of things, including adding flavor to any delivery apizza.

    The brick oven just helps in the cooking process by evening out the heat. If you use a pizza stone in your oven you have nearly the same thing. Oh, and you don't use a pan. The pie goes directly on the floor of the brick oven, or on the stone in your own oven.
    #6
    TJ Jackson
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    RE: Restaurant of the Day 2004/02/24 11:12:41 (permalink)
    Tell me again the difference between a 'pizza' and an 'apizza', spelling aside? I see that certain CT pizza vendors have the word 'apizza' in their names.....was curious....
    #7
    Rusty246
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    RE: Restaurant of the Day 2004/02/24 11:19:47 (permalink)
    Thanks all! I've printed the review(hope thats o.k.!)and believe I will have to purchase a stone and make my own oil. I intend on trying the new place with the brick oven pizza. Sorry to say that my little "hometown" pizzeria.........well maybe I'll just have to have faith!
    #8
    lleechef
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    RE: Restaurant of the Day 2004/02/24 11:35:09 (permalink)
    I have been making hot oil since the beginning of time. I go to the local Chinese market and buy dried red hot peppers for about 59 cents. Then you need to polish off a bottle of wine that comes in a clear (not green) bottle. Easy enough. Get a pino grigio, Santa Margharita is preferred. Buy some good EVOO, a cork stopper/pourer, have some dried herbs(thyme, rosemary and bay leaf) on hand. After you have drunk the wine, put the peppers in the bottle, one by one, occasionally putting in some of your dried herbs. Fill the jar to max with peppers and herbs. Now pour the oil in, put the stopper on and let sit on the counter for at least a week. Pour this tasty oil on pizza, pasta, prosciutto sandwiches or just focaccia. Also makes a great gift along with a Mason quart jar of your homemade canned tomatoes!
    #9
    Kristi S.
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    RE: Restaurant of the Day 2004/02/24 11:56:17 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by lleechef

    I have been making hot oil since the beginning of time. I go to the local Chinese market and buy dried red hot peppers for about 59 cents. Then you need to polish off a bottle of wine that comes in a clear (not green) bottle. Easy enough. Get a pino grigio, Santa Margharita is preferred. Buy some good EVOO, a cork stopper/pourer, have some dried herbs(thyme, rosemary and bay leaf) on hand. After you have drunk the wine, put the peppers in the bottle, one by one, occasionally putting in some of your dried herbs. Fill the jar to max with peppers and herbs. Now pour the oil in, put the stopper on and let sit on the counter for at least a week. Pour this tasty oil on pizza, pasta, prosciutto sandwiches or just focaccia. Also makes a great gift along with a Mason quart jar of your homemade canned tomatoes!


    This sounds great. You have me convinced to try this. The wine drinking part sounds especially fun, though. Do I polish off the whole bottle in one sitting before making the oil? Will I be a better oil-maker because of the wine??

    (not being snarky, just having fun!)
    #10
    Michael Hoffman
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    RE: Restaurant of the Day 2004/02/24 11:56:19 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by TJ Jackson

    Tell me again the difference between a 'pizza' and an 'apizza', spelling aside? I see that certain CT pizza vendors have the word 'apizza' in their names.....was curious....

    The word apizza, pronounced ah-BEETS, is the way the pie is spelled by Neapolitans. The first time I ever heard apizza referred to as pizza, I had no idea what the person was talking about. I then assumed it was a West Virginia thing. Pizza is really an Americanized version of apizza.
    #11
    TJ Jackson
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    RE: Restaurant of the Day 2004/02/24 12:08:50 (permalink)
    Awesome, I had no idea.

    If I go to an apizza place and order one, will it resemble the typical pizza I am familiar with? In what ways will it differ?
    #12
    lleechef
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    RE: Restaurant of the Day 2004/02/24 12:15:20 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by Kristi S.

    quote:
    Originally posted by lleechef

    I have been making hot oil since the beginning of time. I go to the local Chinese market and buy dried red hot peppers for about 59 cents. Then you need to polish off a bottle of wine that comes in a clear (not green) bottle. Easy enough. Get a pino grigio, Santa Margharita is preferred. Buy some good EVOO, a cork stopper/pourer, have some dried herbs(thyme, rosemary and bay leaf) on hand. After you have drunk the wine, put the peppers in the bottle, one by one, occasionally putting in some of your dried herbs. Fill the jar to max with peppers and herbs. Now pour the oil in, put the stopper on and let sit on the counter for at least a week. Pour this tasty oil on pizza, pasta, prosciutto sandwiches or just focaccia. Also makes a great gift along with a Mason quart jar of your homemade canned tomatoes!


    This sounds great. You have me convinced to try this. The wine drinking part sounds especially fun, though. Do I polish off the whole bottle in one sitting before making the oil? Will I be a better oil-maker because of the wine??

    (not being snarky, just having fun!)

    Kristi, as you and I have been labled "barflies" by i95 in his dissertation about the diner he had with clothier, I would say that yes, you should polish off the whole bottle. The bottle of wine will inspire you to make the hot oil. Or maybe inspire you to take a nap and make the hot oil later.........no matter.
    And the only reason I use a clear wine bottle is........because that oil looks lovely on the counter!
    #13
    Michael Hoffman
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    RE: Restaurant of the Day 2004/02/24 12:30:47 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by TJ Jackson

    Awesome, I had no idea.

    If I go to an apizza place and order one, will it resemble the typical pizza I am familiar with? In what ways will it differ?


    It's still a tomato pie. Unless, of course you order one without tomato sauce.
    #14
    Rusty246
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    RE: Restaurant of the Day 2004/02/24 13:27:20 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by lleechef

    quote:
    Originally posted by Kristi S.

    quote:
    Originally posted by lleechef

    I have been making hot oil since the beginning of time. I go to the local Chinese market and buy dried red hot peppers for about 59 cents. Then you need to polish off a bottle of wine that comes in a clear (not green) bottle. Easy enough. Get a pino grigio, Santa Margharita is preferred. Buy some good EVOO, a cork stopper/pourer, have some dried herbs(thyme, rosemary and bay leaf) on hand. After you have drunk the wine, put the peppers in the bottle, one by one, occasionally putting in some of your dried herbs. Fill the jar to max with peppers and herbs. Now pour the oil in, put the stopper on and let sit on the counter for at least a week. Pour this tasty oil on pizza, pasta, prosciutto sandwiches or just focaccia. Also makes a great gift along with a Mason quart jar of your homemade canned tomatoes!


    This sounds great. You have me convinced to try this. The wine drinking part sounds especially fun, though. Do I polish off the whole bottle in one sitting before making the oil? Will I be a better oil-maker because of the wine??

    (not being snarky, just having fun!)

    Kristi, as you and I have been labled "barflies" by i95 in his dissertation about the diner he had with clothier, I would say that yes, you should polish off the whole bottle. The bottle of wine will inspire you to make the hot oil. Or maybe inspire you to take a nap and make the hot oil later.........no matter.
    And the only reason I use a clear wine bottle is........because that oil looks lovely on the counter!


    Ah ha! When we went to the seafood festival in October there was a lady with a booth set up that was selling oils! She had so many different type clear containers it was unbelivable. She had bottles that were 4 ft tall, she had ones that interlocked, it was really a beautiful set-up. All had different "designs"(colors)that she made out of the oil, peppers, garlic, fresh herbs, etc. Oh yes it's all coming back to me!
    #15
    Grampy
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    RE: Restaurant of the Day 2004/02/24 13:32:56 (permalink)
    Watch those designer oils and vinegars, though. Many are just pretty, and that's it. Boyajian makes some nice oils, but they are not cheap. However, they are sold at Trader Joe's under the TJ label, and are much cheaper there.
    #16
    howard8
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    RE: Restaurant of the Day 2004/02/24 14:49:52 (permalink)
    That pizza looks so good. I am thinking road trip from northwest nj just as soon as I get off this damn south beach diet. I love pizza with oil oozing on top and the hotter the better.
    #17
    Willly
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    RE: Restaurant of the Day 2004/02/24 16:32:44 (permalink)
    Colony used to be just a few blocks from my office. Not anymore, now that I'm in NYC. My usual was a stinger and sausage. There was less oil than the hot oil, fresh sausage from deJulio's across the street, and six of those little green peppers shown in the picture -- one for every slice. Unbelievable heat and incredibly delicious.
    #18
    Route 11
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    RE: Restaurant of the Day 2004/02/24 16:50:58 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by lleechef

    I have been making hot oil since the beginning of time. I go to the local Chinese market and buy dried red hot peppers for about 59 cents. Then you need to polish off a bottle of wine that comes in a clear (not green) bottle. Easy enough. Get a pino grigio, Santa Margharita is preferred. Buy some good EVOO, a cork stopper/pourer, have some dried herbs(thyme, rosemary and bay leaf) on hand. After you have drunk the wine, put the peppers in the bottle, one by one, occasionally putting in some of your dried herbs. Fill the jar to max with peppers and herbs. Now pour the oil in, put the stopper on and let sit on the counter for at least a week. Pour this tasty oil on pizza, pasta, prosciutto sandwiches or just focaccia. Also makes a great gift along with a Mason quart jar of your homemade canned tomatoes!


    Very cool. I might do that tonight. I like hot stuff. And thanks for the a-pizza definition. I kept my mouth shut but always wondered.

    #19
    Rusty246
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    RE: Restaurant of the Day 2004/02/24 16:59:23 (permalink)
    To refridgerate or not to refridgerate the oil, that is the question???
    #20
    Route 11
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    RE: Restaurant of the Day 2004/02/24 17:31:34 (permalink)
    Don't do it! Just keep it in a cool, dark place, capped tightly.
    #21
    lleechef
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    RE: Restaurant of the Day 2004/02/24 17:38:01 (permalink)
    As long as you don't put anything FRESH into the oil: garlic, fresh herbs, fresh peppers, it never will need refridgeration. Use only DRIED ingredients. It'll sit nicely on your counter forever and just keep getting hotter.
    #22
    Billfish
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    RE: Restaurant of the Day 2004/02/24 18:42:32 (permalink)
    So I guess this is like the "red oil" that we ask for in Chinese restaurants? That stuff is pretty hot,but its mostly a necessity what with most of the Chinese restaurants and take outs being wimpy about turning up the heat nowadays.I could see where it would be good on a pizza.Or on a lot of things,actually.I never really considered it as other than a Chinese restaurant condiment.I need to get out more.


    #23
    Grampy
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    RE: Restaurant of the Day 2004/02/24 18:54:14 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by Billfish

    So I guess this is like the "red oil" that we ask for in Chinese restaurants? That stuff is pretty hot,but its mostly a necessity what with most of the Chinese restaurants and take outs being wimpy about turning up the heat nowadays.I could see where it would be good on a pizza.Or on a lot of things,actually.I never really considered it as other than a Chinese restaurant condiment.I need to get out more.





    Hi Billfish. As I mentioned earlier, just make sure you don't get it with sesame oil. That will make the pizza taste awful. Some use hot oils use peanut oil, canola, or soybean oil, but I agree with lleechef, good extra virgin olive oil is best, and not hard to make.
    #24
    Billfish
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    RE: Restaurant of the Day 2004/02/24 19:05:54 (permalink)
    Acknowledged,Grampy.Thanks.
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    UncleVic
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    RE: Restaurant of the Day 2004/02/24 21:08:26 (permalink)
    Now I feel like taking a dough ball for a 8 inch pizza, rolling it out to 12"s, but that wait while the oil marinates.... ARGHHHHH...
    #26
    Spudnut
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    RE: Restaurant of the Day 2004/02/24 23:37:54 (permalink)
    I began the South Beach diet eight days ago (it'll be nine days in 24 minutes, but who's counting?) Even before today's review, I agreed with myself that once I reach my midpoint goal, I'm driving to Stamford to reward myself with that pizza, which just looks amazing.
    #27
    Rick F.
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    RE: Restaurant of the Day 2004/02/25 01:01:28 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by lleechef

    As long as you don't put anything FRESH into the oil: garlic, fresh herbs, fresh peppers, it never will need refridgeration. Use only DRIED ingredients. It'll sit nicely on your counter forever and just keep getting hotter.
    I suspect this is why the recipes I've read indicate that one must sterilize the additions to keep them from growing unfriendly microorganisms? (Down home here we call them critters.)

    Steven, why can't we have a smiley for these critters?
    #28
    Rick F.
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    RE: Restaurant of the Day 2004/02/25 01:02:37 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by Rick F.

    quote:
    Originally posted by lleechef

    As long as you don't put anything FRESH into the oil: garlic, fresh herbs, fresh peppers, it never will need refridgeration. Use only DRIED ingredients. It'll sit nicely on your counter forever and just keep getting hotter.
    I suspect this is why the recipes I've read indicate that one must sterilize the additions to keep them from growing unfriendly microorganisms? (Down home here we call them critters.)

    Stephen R., why can't we have a smiley for these critters?
    #29
    Adjudicator
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    RE: Restaurant of the Day 2004/02/25 20:07:41 (permalink)
    It's amazing how sometimes threads repeat themselves, months later. I noticed a few questions in this thread concerning pizza (ha...) Anyway, I posted this link many months ago. All pizza questions are further answered here. If only there were more Pizza Therapists in the world, it would be a better place, indeed. BTW, this site has an excellent FREE monthly newsletter via email. And NO, I am not affiliated with this site...

    http://pizzatherapy.com/
    #30
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