Rice is Nice

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Marsh
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2003/10/28 03:00:50 (permalink)

Rice is Nice

This forum is full of potatoes, what about rice and/or macaroni? In Southeast Texas we eat a lot of rice. We especially eat rice&gravy, ie. cream gravy with our chicken fried steak, chicken, or pork chops. Good with blackeyed peas and cornbread! We eat Spanish Rice with Mexican, sometimes it becomes the main dish with some browned ground beef added. We eat rice with gumbo(chicken & sausage or shrimp&crab), etouffee, shrimp creole, and even chili. We eat rice balls which looks and taste like kibbee. There is dirty rice with BBQ Brisket. Good with Pinto Beans. There is broccoli rice casserole. Red Beans and Rice! Beef Tips or smothered steak and rice. There is of course, just plain rice and butter.
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    Mayhaw Man
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    RE: Rice is Nice 2003/10/28 08:37:52 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by Marsh

    This forum is full of potatoes, what about rice and/or macaroni? In Southeast Texas we eat a lot of rice. We especially eat rice&gravy, ie. cream gravy with our chicken fried steak, chicken, or pork chops. Good with blackeyed peas and cornbread! We eat Spanish Rice with Mexican, sometimes it becomes the main dish with some browned ground beef added. We eat rice with gumbo(chicken & sausage or shrimp&crab), etouffee, shrimp creole, and even chili. We eat rice balls which looks and taste like kibbee. There is dirty rice with BBQ Brisket. Good with Pinto Beans. There is broccoli rice casserole. Red Beans and Rice! Beef Tips or smothered steak and rice. There is of course, just plain rice and butter.


    We eat rice four or five days a week, with an occasional potato thrown in on off nights. All kinds of rice. My kids love basmati, texmati, long grain, medium grain (our staple, milled in Crowley LA), short grain in Sushi Rolls (which we make about once a week, great for next day kid lunches), arborio (I love risotto with lots of onions and a few toasted chopped pecans) yellow rice, rice pudding mmmmmmm, hell, I even like Rice a Roni, that San Francisco Treat.

    We used to grow the stuff when I was growing up, but have not put in many acres in recent years, with the exception of a couple of large plots (40 acres or so) that have a whole lot to do with duck food and not much to do with anything else. Most of the farm that is not in turf (sod) spends it's time on the usual mix of cotton, corn and soybeans.

    Incidentally, it has been a banner year for damn near every crop in the Delta, as Liketoeat pointed out a few days ago. Not that that will ever be translated into savings for consumers, as the suppliers (farmers) have come to have nothing to do with what is charged at the store and even though this is a great year, many of them will get out with little more than loan paybacks and a new loan for next year (politics over...I'm sorry...just feel strongly about this situation)
    #2
    tiki
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    RE: Rice is Nice 2003/10/28 09:01:03 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by Mayhaw Man
    Incidentally, it has been a banner year for damn near every crop in the Delta, as Liketoeat pointed out a few days ago. Not that that will ever be translated into savings for consumers, as the suppliers (farmers) have come to have nothing to do with what is charged at the store and even though this is a great year, many of them will get out with little more than loan paybacks and a new loan for next year (politics over...I'm sorry...just feel strongly about this situation)


    Her Here! seems like in a good year farmers get screwed and in a bad year farmers get screwed---FAMILY farmers anyway---corperates make money all the time!!!---but like you said---enough politics. and---we eat ALOT of rice---i cook it at least twice as often as potatos--and since i have a thing about wok/asian cooking it seems i do more rice all the time. Used to do alot of pasta and noodles but growning up in a VERY Italian family i tired of it after a while--(My mother made pasta to go with Roast beef and mashed potatos!!- and always enough to serve 8 more then we were feeding,which ment if we were hungry after school--------there was ALWAYS pasta!) Then living as long as i did in Northern Calif---LOTS of rice farms--including my favorite--Lundborg Farms Organic Rice Farm---they products are fabulaous,extrenely varied and they get more rice per acre then anyone on earth.Living in NOLA also led to an adiction to rice---especially the dirty kind.--( you know the Japanese have a dish with a name i cant pronounce that is almost exactlly the same as dirty rice!)
    so--if you serving dinner---pass the rice this way!
    While im on this subjsct--you folks got any favorite varieties---Personally,it depends on what im serving,but overall I am totally enamored of Basmati!
    #3
    jpatweb
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    RE: Rice is Nice 2003/10/28 09:35:48 (permalink)
    The preference in our house is Thailand-grown jasmine rice. We buy it in 25 lb bags. Gives off a tremendous smell when it is cooking.
    quote:
    Originally posted by tiki


    While im on this subjsct--you folks got any favorite varieties---Personally,it depends on what im serving,but overall I am totally enamored of Basmati!
    #4
    jdg68
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    RE: Rice is Nice 2003/10/28 09:36:27 (permalink)
    Yes I love rice too. Usually basmati or jasmine. Right now I have about 20lbs of rice hanging around. Black beans and rice; dirty rice; rice with asian main dishes; rice with soy and hot sauce...sauteed okra, peppers and onions with rice...If you are in a hurry the Zatarain's mixes are good and you can always add to them. I'd say I am split 50/50 between rice and pasta.
    #5
    Liketoeat
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    RE: Rice is Nice 2003/10/28 10:11:59 (permalink)
    Agree with all of the above posts re rice. It is delicious in so many ways, and for me it's a must with roast chicken and gravy (somehow potatoes just don't cut it in that meal). Thank goodness for this year's great crops of all sorts, but, unfortunately, you guys, Mayhaw and tiki, are right with your comments re results of such for both consumers and family farmers (which in actuality no longer exist). I surely don't know the answer to this country's agricultural economic situation, but don't feel very sorry for lots of farmers I know (and all their "poor mouthing") when I read the reports of governmental agricultural subsidies they have received (definitely go to the website http://www.ewg.org/farm/ for most interesting reading re this subject). Anyway, everyone, keep eating that rice for assume such somehow helps our local economy.
    #6
    Lone Star
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    RE: Rice is Nice 2003/10/28 10:14:09 (permalink)
    My poor husband, being raised in deep South Texas had never had gravy and rice til he married me. He could not believe how good it is.

    I love Basmati, and have also become hooked on Zatarain's. There is something about the texture that is so good.

    Does anyone use a ricemaker or have any recommendations for such?
    #7
    scbuzz
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    RE: Rice is Nice 2003/10/28 10:47:45 (permalink)
    Being from SC, we are big consumers of rice. In fact the coastal area of SC used to be a big rice producer (before the Civil War). We still have a rice plantation near Florence SC.

    I love rice, especially with stewed tomatoes over it. That is one of my comfort foods !!

    Speaking of Zatarin's I love their red beans and rice mixture. I add some red hot smoked sausages and make a great meal out of it !

    Don't use a rice maker, just boil it on the stove the old fashioned way !

    These days I am trying to stick to the Atkins diet and rice is a no-no !!!
    #8
    Liketoeat
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    RE: Rice is Nice 2003/10/28 11:33:36 (permalink)
    Everyone I've ever known from South Carolina (most are from Georgetown and Columbia areas) has absolutely loved rice and tomatoes - nothing else needed. (I like that combination but somehow I always wanted a little meat, shimp, or something added to it.) Most rabid tomato-rice fan of all I've known was a Navy roommate from SC who was a particulary picky eater; seems the wardroom food never suited him, but the Filipino stewards nearly always had a pot of rice in the galley which they'd fixed for themselves. Bill would go back there & get them to give him some of their rice, heat up some tomatoes out of a can if none others available, dump tomatoes over the rice, and would then be as happy/satisfied with his meal as one could be.
    #9
    lleechef
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    RE: Rice is Nice 2003/10/28 11:49:21 (permalink)
    Ahhhhh......rice! Arborio, jasmine, basmati, wild, nishiki, they're all wonderful and the possibilities are endless! Risotto could take up a whole thread in itself! You could add prosciutto or peas or lemon or thyme or seafood or....on and on. Grilled vegetable wild rice. Dirty rice. Beans and rice. Used to do a dish at the restaurant......dry-aged my duck breasts, then grilled them. In the middle of the plate, a sticky rice cake topped with sauteed pea tendrils, the sliced duck surrounding all the above and a squish of soy/ginger/garlic infusion.
    #10
    Lone Star
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    RE: Rice is Nice 2003/10/28 12:07:35 (permalink)
    Sticky Rice! We go to The Golden Room, a Thai place every so often, and the sticky rice for dessert is incredible. I have no idea how it is made.

    Another thing about this place, when the rice is served with your entree, it is shaped like the state of Texas.

    I am hungry now.
    #11
    Mayhaw Man
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    RE: Rice is Nice 2003/10/28 12:26:35 (permalink)
    Since we've got this thread going and someone above mentioned cooking methods, I would like to weigh in on the technology of the rice cooker.

    When rice is being cooked at my house these days, if it is just a straight pot of rice we use a rice cooker. It is a wonder of modern kitchen science designed by some Japanese guys at Hitachi. It cost a little under a hundred bucks and has, at this point, never failed to turn out fluffy, individually happy little grains of life. It also holds it nicely for a pretty good period of time. There has been some experimentation done in our elaborate test kitchens at Mayhaw Central as far as water rice ratios on different kinds of rice, but once that was out of the way even a child can make rice in that thing (mine often do). To save potential disasters I took a sharpie and wrote ratios on the side of the thing (not very Martha Stewart I know, but very practical).

    I have extolled the wonders of this thing far and wide and even GAVE one to my mother, a woman who can run circles around Martha S. in the kitchen, but she has yet to take it out of the box. Some people are resistant to change. So once again, I am telling you that are still rattling the pots and pans, move into the modern world and try one of these things out. There are models at Wally World that cost under $40 that get good reviews on epinions, so it doesn't have to cost much.

    There are many things I make that require the old method of pot cooking or skillet cooking (brown rice and risotto come immediatly to mind), but for most things it works just great.

    Five billion oriental guys can't be wrong.


    This message has been brought to you by
    THE AMERICAN RICE COOKER ASSOCIATION
    #12
    Howard Baratz
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    RE: Rice is Nice 2003/10/28 12:34:47 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by lleechef
    dry-aged my duck breasts


    lleechef:

    I know it's just my sick mind, but taken out of context this is one very odd hunk of syntax.
    #13
    4fish
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    RE: Rice is Nice 2003/10/28 12:40:34 (permalink)
    I'm with you, Mayhaw Man! I love my rice cooker. I've had it for about five years and can't remember the brand, though I'm sure I didn't pay more than $40 for it. It's got a timer that shuts off the machine so I don't have to worry about boiling the rice dry, and it turns out perfectly every time. No more soggy rice.
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    jpatweb
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    RE: Rice is Nice 2003/10/28 12:49:42 (permalink)
    Yes to a rice cooker. Mine is about 20 years old and is by far the oldest and most reliable kitchen appliance in the house. Easy to use(water to rice ratio being the only question mark) and super easy to clean. I can't imagine there are significant differences in performance between the brands on the marketplace. Let price be your deciding point.
    quote:
    Originally posted by Lone Star

    Does anyone use a ricemaker or have any recommendations for such?
    #15
    lleechef
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    RE: Rice is Nice 2003/10/28 12:58:57 (permalink)
    HB, yes, you do have a sick mind! You gotta dry-age those breasts for at least 5 days in the walk-in (liberally sprinkled with 5-spice powder first) otherwise the skin will not be crispy! Mayhaw, thank you for that public service announcement from the ARCA......you're gonna be surprised at this, but I still have not bought a rice cooker and all my friends from Japan and Vietnam swear by them, thus, your statement about the five billion Oriental guys is certainly true. I learned how to REALLY cook rice from the SiriLankan houseboys that worked for M. Jean Riboud when I was his chef.
    #16
    hermitt4d
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    RE: Rice is Nice 2003/10/28 12:59:23 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by scbuzz

    Being from SC, we are big consumers of rice. In fact the coastal area of SC used to be a big rice producer (before the Civil War). We still have a rice plantation near Florence SC.

    I love rice, especially with stewed tomatoes over it. That is one of my comfort foods !!

    Speaking of Zatarin's I love their red beans and rice mixture. I add some red hot smoked sausages and make a great meal out of it !

    Don't use a rice maker, just boil it on the stove the old fashioned way !

    These days I am trying to stick to the Atkins diet and rice is a no-no !!!


    Ditto on the Atkins diet, and I had just purchased a 15 # bag of basmati (also a bread maker and stocked up on King Arthur flours!) A favorite meal for me used to be a big plate of rice, slathered with butter and coarse ground black pepper .

    There used to be a restaurant here, Fox Diner, that specialized in Low Country cooking. They served a rice which they said was from SC and it was some of the best rice I've ever had. What is the name of this plantation? Do they do mail-order?

    Oh yes, might as well mention, they also served some stone-ground grits from SC that were the best I ever had. Any ideas on that?

    Thanks .
    #17
    Mayhaw Man
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    RE: Rice is Nice 2003/10/28 13:08:12 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by jpatweb

    Yes to a rice cooker. Mine is about 20 years old and is by far the oldest and most reliable kitchen appliance in the house. Easy to use(water to rice ratio being the only question mark) and super easy to clean. I can't imagine there are significant differences in performance between the brands on the marketplace. Let price be your deciding point.

    quote:
    Originally posted by Lone Star

    Does anyone use a ricemaker or have any recommendations for such?



    You are right as far as I can tell, The only significant difference in some of the upper end models is some sort of "fuzzy logic" feature that helps hold the rice better than the ones that just cook and go to warm.

    But for most folks, making two cups of rice for the family dinner, the cheap ones work just as well. We have a Black and Decker (now there is a manly rice cooker) at our camp and it works great. Even tired, slightly (or not so slightly" />) inebriated hunters with widely varying levels of cooking ability and intelligence can operate it successfully.
    #18
    scbuzz
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    RE: Rice is Nice 2003/10/28 13:18:23 (permalink)
    The Rice from SC is called Carolina Plantation Rice. To my knowledge they do not sell online and in fact do not even have a web site. The plantation is located on the Pee Dee River just outside of Florence SC.

    You can order some of the rice from certain authorized resellers !

    Such as this one :

    http://www.carolinafoodpros.com/products/details.aspx?gid=3&pid=00011
    #19
    Marsh
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    RE: Rice is Nice 2003/10/28 13:31:04 (permalink)
    I am impressed with the responces. I forgot that Cali grows rice, eventhough I have kin in Suisun City. I wish trade with Cuba could happen, more markets for our rice. They make Arroz con Pollo and Moros Y Cristianos (black beans and rice cooked together so that the rice is black hued) The Iranians cook good basmati rice. The Lebanese rice with pasta. What about jambalaya, paella, biryani, and pilafs?
    #20
    hermitt4d
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    RE: Rice is Nice 2003/10/28 16:45:47 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by scbuzz

    The Rice from SC is called Carolina Plantation Rice. To my knowledge they do not sell online and in fact do not even have a web site. The plantation is located on the Pee Dee River just outside of Florence SC.

    You can order some of the rice from certain authorized resellers !

    Such as this one :

    http://www.carolinafoodpros.com/products/details.aspx?gid=3&pid=00011



    Thank you so very much, scbuzz . I bet that's it. Well, I guess there goes Atkins , for a taste or two, anyway.
    #21
    dendan
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    RE: Rice is Nice 2003/10/31 13:18:00 (permalink)
    Originally posted by scbuzz

    Being from SC, we are big consumers of rice.

    Surely, being from SC you have not forgotten the age old favoriteGRITS. A great replacement for potatoes, rice, etc.
    Enjoy them at all meals...
    #22
    scbuzz
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    RE: Rice is Nice 2003/10/31 13:43:33 (permalink)
    Oh YEAH !!!! You BET !!! We are even bigger consumers of GRITS !!!!


    Good stuff .... the Boykin Mill grist mill is very close to my house. Fresh stone ground GRITS !!!



    #23
    RedPatti
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    RE: Rice is Nice 2003/10/31 15:11:31 (permalink)
    For years I always wondered why I loved rice over potatos. I lived the first four years of my life in Beaufort, South Carolina (where I was born) before moving to Honduras for 4 years then on to California where I have remained (not counting traveling around the country with my husband when he was in the Army).

    Still loving rice so much more than potatoes. I even have a child who hates potatoes and loves rice 100%. I have always felt displaced and have gone "home" for visits as often as possible. Love driving the backroads to my Uncle Carroll's fishcamp in Dale.
    #24
    spadoman
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    RE: Rice is Nice 2003/10/31 15:52:42 (permalink)
    We eat a lot of brown rice around here. we use short grain. I was told that in the colder climates of predominant rice growing countries, the colder it was, the shorter the grain.
    Not being a farmer, let alone a rice farmer, I don't know if this is true, but we like the short grain anyhow.

    You are correct mayhaw man, the rice cooker, a fabulous contraption for white rice, doesn't do the brown stuff very well, we use a stove top pan with a lid.

    Also, here in Minnesota, wild rice has its place. Today, I made some turkey wild rice soup. I especially like the lake grown varieties better than the cultivated. If it is parched like the Native folks did it for the past 1000 years or so, it is slightly smokey and cooks rather quickly. The taste is distinctive, seems to go really well with turkey and chicken.
    Stuff the bird with wild rice stuffing! MMMMMMMMM
    #25
    Ort. Carlton.
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    RE: Rice is Nice 2003/10/31 18:53:40 (permalink)
    Dearfolk,
    It's off the food topic, but I have the 45 "Rice Is Nice" by The Lemon Pipers. Has anyone heard it played as an oldie?
    Obscurely, Ort. "Bottom 100" Carlton in Athens, Georgia.
    P. S. I'm off starches for awhile until I lose some more weight: no grits, potatoes, gravy, rice, nor sauces. I haven't missed them so far, but I am going for a beer - just one - when I leave the library!
    #26
    EdSails
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    RE: Rice is Nice 2003/10/31 20:59:12 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by Mayhaw Man
    hell, I even like Rice a Roni, that San Francisco Treat.



    As many times as I've been in SF----I still haven't seen Rice-A-Roni on a menu there!

    My daughter, however----considers Rice-a-Roni one of the 4 major food groups. We have a whole shelf in the pantry devoted to it! I get about half a foot left for my arborio, jasmine and Kohuko sushi rice.
    #27
    2005Equinox
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    RE: Rice is Nice 2003/11/06 02:14:55 (permalink)
    I love Rice-A-Roni!!!!!!!!!!!!!. I also like a rice served by a restauraunt in Appleton called O' Rileys. Its beef flavored and really good!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Wild rice mixes are really good too.
    #28
    JimInKy
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    RE: Rice is Nice 2003/11/06 10:52:48 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by Lone Star

    Does anyone use a ricemaker or have any recommendations for such?

    When I wanted to buy a rice cooker in 1998, a friend who owns Lexington's premier Asian restaurant, offered his help.

    My friend grew up in Taiwan and has a good opinion of the National brand of rice cookers (most rice cookers sold in Taiwan are National). Manufacturer in Thailand by Matsu****i, these rice cookers are sold in the U.S. under the brand name Panasonic.

    My unit, Panasonic model # SR-W15FP, is a rice cooker and steamer. My friend and I looked all over Lexington for the National/Panasonic unit before finding it at WalMart, selling for $35. I later bought another one as a gift.

    This unit will also steam a large amount of fresh vegetables with excellent results (it's about how much H2O is added). It's sold with a plastic measuring cup, a nice rice scoop, a steaming rack, and good operating instructions. The lid is part see-through glass.

    I generally use the rice cooker 1 to 3 times a week. Having one encourages me to cook more, since it's so easy to make meals around rice. Cooked rice stores well and nicely reheats in a microwave. Last night I added some refrigerated rice to homemade chicken soup. The night before I had warmed up rice with smoked deli sausage and stir fried Szechuan cabbage.

    This Panasonic unit seemed better made than many of the rice cookers I saw. Panasonic also sold the unit with a solid glass lid (model # SR-W15PC). Both models may be available online; I haven't looked.

    Several friends warned me about small rice cookers that make only a few cups. These leave a thick crust on the bottom of the rice. Everyone was insistent that I buy a rice cooker that can cook up to eight 6 ounce cups of raw rice. Back then no one seemed impressed with pricey electronic models, which are common now and more reasonably priced.

    My friend told me how to get a better result from my unit: Combine the water and rice a half hour before cooking (I add salt). The moment the switch pops up, indicating the rice is done, unplug the machine so the warmer function will not continue cooking the rice (this is very important as the warmer will dry out the rice, leaving a thicker, browner crust on the bottom). Leave the lid closed for at least 15 minutes after the switch pops up, so the rice continues to steam. The rice will stay warm a long time, even with the warmer off.

    The reliable rice cooker allows me to focus completely on other parts of a meal without worrying about how the rice will turn out. I can cook rice just fine, but appreciate the consistency of a problem-free method. I sometimes substitute chicken stock or make curried rice.

    After I bought the rice cooker, I began buying 50 lb. bags of premium medium grain white rice through my friend's restaurant. This rice is grown in California and is much superior to the par boiled 12 or 14 minute white rice found at Kroger. Raw rice will take from 25 to 30 minutes to cook on the stove.

    When my friend's son went off to Georgia Tech this fall, I looked for the Panasonic rice cooker for him to take along. but they are definitely gone from the stores here. I turned to Consumer Reports for help and found that CR looked at only fancy electronic models ($50 and up), or inexpensive, simple models (no "keep warm" feature). According to CR, some of the inexpensive models, like the Salton RA3 and the Aroma ARC-703G work just fine. So we bought him the 6 cup Aroma (rice cooker only) that sells for about $20.

    #29
    JimInKy
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    RE: Rice is Nice 2004/02/04 14:54:46 (permalink)
    A rice cooker recommendation from the February '04 Cook's Illustrated monthly newsletter (mailed free to people registed at their Web site):

    The Best No-Frills Rice Cooker

    Here in the test kitchen, we depend on electric rice cookers for perfect, foolproof rice. We had two questions. How do they work, and which model is best? It turns out that rice cookers do not have timers. Instead, they turn themselves off when the temperature in the inner pot starts to rise, something that occurs when the water is fully absorbed by the rice. A good rice cooker will then shift to a "keep warm" setting, which holds the rice at about 180 degrees.

    Our favorite no-frills model is the 5-cup National SR-W10NA ($37.99).
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