SOB Stew

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2005/04/22 22:51:50 (permalink)

SOB Stew

Or son of gun stew if you will.

Where in Dallas? Where in Texas? Where period?
#1

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    Lone Star
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    RE: SOB Stew 2005/04/26 10:15:58 (permalink)
    Hey Okie - I cannot recall ever seeing it on a menu in a restaurant, but you can find recipes on the net. Now, what people call Son-of-a-Gun today in no way resembles the traditional Son-of-a-Gun from the old days. Today, you can find or make a recipe that is similar to many other beef stews, but true Son-of-a-Gun is an entirely different thing. See the recipe below for ingredients. THAT is the traditinal Son-of-a-Gun.

    Son-of-a-Gun Stew
    1/4 Pound beef suet, finely chopped
    1 Calf heart, cut in small pieces
    1 Calf liver, cut in small pieces
    2 Calf kidneys, cut in small pieces
    Marrow gut, chopped
    1 Pound sweetbreads, simmered in salt water and membrane removed
    1/2 Pound brain, soaked in salt water, deveined and cubed
    1 Large onion, chopped
    1 Can of tomatoes
    2 Cups beef broth
    Hot peppers, as desired

    In a large Dutch oven render fat from beef suet.
    Add heart, liver, kidneys and marrow gut.(see note below for description)
    Cook over high heat until lightly browned. Add prepared sweetbreads and brain and remaining ingredients.
    Cover and cook 1 to 2 hours or until tender and thickened. Season with salt to taste.

    Ruff Justice

    Good Luck!
    #2
    efuery
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    RE: SOB Stew 2005/04/26 10:25:50 (permalink)
    What is "marrow gut"?
    #3
    wheregreggeats.com
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    RE: SOB Stew 2005/04/26 10:31:14 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by Lone Star

    Hey Okie - I cannot recall ever seeing it on a menu in a restaurant, but you can find recipes on the net. Now, what people call Son-of-a-Gun today in no way resembles the traditional Son-of-a-Gun from the old days. Today, you can find or make a recipe that is similar to many other beef stews, but true Son-of-a-Gun is an entirely different thing. See the recipe below for ingredients. THAT is the traditinal Son-of-a-Gun.

    Son-of-a-Gun Stew
    1/4 Pound beef suet, finely chopped
    1 Calf heart, cut in small pieces
    1 Calf liver, cut in small pieces
    2 Calf kidneys, cut in small pieces
    Marrow gut, chopped
    1 Pound sweetbreads, simmered in salt water and membrane removed
    1/2 Pound brain, soaked in salt water, deveined and cubed
    1 Large onion, chopped
    1 Can of tomatoes
    2 Cups beef broth
    Hot peppers, as desired

    In a large Dutch oven render fat from beef suet.
    Add heart, liver, kidneys and marrow gut.(see note below for description)
    Cook over high heat until lightly browned. Add prepared sweetbreads and brain and remaining ingredients.
    Cover and cook 1 to 2 hours or until tender and thickened. Season with salt to taste.

    Ruff Justice

    Good Luck!
    Even without trying this, I suspect I won't be adding it to the "Foods I LIKE that other people don't" thread.
    #4
    Sundancer7
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    RE: SOB Stew 2005/04/26 11:53:02 (permalink)
    I strongly suspect that this nice recipe will never enter my kitchen.

    Paul E. Smith
    Knoxville, TN
    #5
    Michael Hoffman
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    RE: SOB Stew 2005/04/26 12:43:28 (permalink)
    I've been making and eating Son of a Gun Stew for more years than I care to remember, and I've never heard of it being made with heart,liver, kidney, marrow, brains or sweetbreads.
    #6
    Lone Star
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    RE: SOB Stew 2005/04/26 13:15:58 (permalink)
    That is because you aren't a cowboy.
    #7
    Michael Hoffman
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    RE: SOB Stew 2005/04/26 13:25:04 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by Lone Star

    That is because you aren't a cowboy.

    I was once, but when the bumper sticker that said, "Save The Horses. Ride a Cowboy Instead" came out I quit.
    #8
    tiki
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    RE: SOB Stew 2005/04/26 14:19:12 (permalink)
    So Lonestar---whens dinner I'll try it!!!!
    #9
    Lone Star
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    RE: SOB Stew 2005/04/26 14:46:46 (permalink)
    I would have to be awfully hungry to make that tiki. I can't imagine that it would smell very good cooking either.
    #10
    Lone Star
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    RE: SOB Stew 2005/04/26 15:00:19 (permalink)
    Actually, son-of-a-gun stew was usually the first meal made after an animal was killed because it includes the parts that would spoil first – the organ meats. My great-uncle cowboyed on the Four Sixes most of his life and in his story-telling told me it could "take the hide off a mule"!

    It was made by the Coosie out on the trail if they had to slaughter an animal (especially calves) due to injury.

    You can find lots of recipes for it now that have been "gringoed" up.
    #11
    tiki
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    RE: SOB Stew 2005/04/26 16:01:01 (permalink)
    It really doesnt seem to me it would be all that bad---heck ive eaten all those parts--even paid handsomely for sweetbreads a few times! Sheesh you could have said a LOT WORSE PARTS then these!!!!--and come to think of it--ive eaten most of them too!
    #12
    Art Deco
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    RE: SOB Stew 2005/04/26 17:51:30 (permalink)
    If I remember correctly, marrow gut is the tube that connects the stomachs in a calf...
    #13
    Adjudicator
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    RE: SOB Stew 2005/04/26 18:22:16 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by Sundancer7

    I strongly suspect that this nice recipe will never enter my kitchen.

    Paul E. Smith
    Knoxville, TN


    I strongly avow that this nice recipe will never enter my kitchen.

    and
    #14
    Born in OKC
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    RE: SOB Stew 2005/04/27 09:37:11 (permalink)
    Lone Star and others,

    Thanks for the recipe which I think similar to something Frank X. Tolbert published many years ago, although I'm not sure about the tomatoes.

    To the nay sayers, to each his own! I have to say that I eat kidney, liver, and sweetbreads some times and pay a high price for the latter in a restaurant. Brains are good also, although there are concerns with mad cow disease nowadays. And menudo. And haggis.

    And I eat chorizo and kokoretsi and Cajun sausages. And I've tried various funny oriental things such as fish maw.

    MICHEAL HOFFMAN AND ADJUDICATOR, I have enjoyed and will continue to enjoy your posts although it might - depending on the setting - be we would have trouble sitting down to dinner together.

    tiki, who knows. Maybe someday we'll be in JMs in Eufaula at the same time someday.

    While on the subject of improbable foods, I've read that the horse Indians on the plains relished raw still warm buffalo liver seasoned with gall from the same animal, immediately after starting to butcher the beast. I'm not too sure I'd try that, but who knows. Probably I'm more likely to get SOB stew someday!

    The margut or mar gut or marrow gut is the critical item in a real and original SOB stew. I've never seen it in any market although I'm told that it is found in Hispanic Carcinerias (where I have a communications problem). The desired part is only found in unweaned calves, perhaps unborn calves. The texture changes after the animal matures and goes off milk.

    If anyone who chances to read this thread ever learns that this dish will be offered at some special event such as a church dinner, rodeo, etc., please repost.

    Thanks for all the interesting comment.
    #15
    Lavanda
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    RE: SOB Stew 2005/04/27 13:15:13 (permalink)
    OKC, this could be the idea for a new type of cook off !

    Methinks the termaters are not in the original recipe, sinply because they are so perishable - but there was probably full of dried chiles, thus the staement about "take the hide off a mule"



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    #16
    tiki
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    RE: SOB Stew 2005/04/27 14:54:13 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by Lavanda

    OKC, this could be the idea for a new type of cook off !

    Methinks the termaters are not in the original recipe, sinply because they are so perishable - but there was probably full of dried chiles, thus the staement about "take the hide off a mule"



    innards-recipe-subscribe@egroups.com

    ancient-recipe-subscribe@egroups.com

    food-hx-recipe-subscribe@egroups.com


    Good point--at least until the advent of canned vegies to the western frontier--which i believe was earlier then one might expect.

    and GREAT LINKS!! Thanks!
    #17
    ctfrasier
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    RE: SOB Stew 2005/04/27 15:40:16 (permalink)
    Why, oh why, did I read this thread?
    #18
    Rick F.
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    RE: SOB Stew 2005/04/27 16:28:47 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by tiki
    Good point--at least until the advent of canned vegies to the western frontier--which i believe was earlier then one might expect.
    I found this at the[url='http://www.foodreference.com/html/artcanninghistory.html']Food Reference Web Site[/url]:

    Thomas Kensett, who emigrated to the United States, established the first U.S. canning facility for oysters, meats, fruits and vegetables in New York in 1812. More than 50 years later, Louis Pasteur provided the explanation for canning's effectiveness when he was able to demonstrate that the growth of microorganisms is the cause of food spoilage.
    #19
    tiki
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    RE: SOB Stew 2005/04/27 17:27:18 (permalink)
    Rick--i knew it was early on because when "Little Jake" grandson of Maureen O'Sullivan and "Big Jake" Wayne was kidnapped by Pallidin, Big Jake was eating canned peaches--his favorite cold camp food--and we all KNOW that THAT man was a real cowboy fron the old west!!!---and i believe that the canning process came about along with production in France as a method of food preservation for Nepoleans army.
    #20
    Rick F.
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    RE: SOB Stew 2005/04/27 17:56:03 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by tiki

    i believe that the canning process came about along with production in France as a method of food preservation for Nepoleans army.
    That's what the link said. That cotton-pickin' link will give you more informatioon than you want about just about anything food-related!
    #21
    Born in OKC
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    RE: SOB Stew 2005/06/13 21:35:02 (permalink)
    I bought a used book last Saturday, Cajun Cuisine: Authentic Cajun Recipes From Louisiana's Bayou COuntry. published in Lafayette in 1985. All people involved, mentioned in the prefaces and so on, seem to have French names. Unfortunately, there is not much history for individual recipes.

    One of the recipes is for "Lagniappe Stew," which is much like the one Lone Star quoted above except that it omits sweetbreads and tomato and adds green pepper and pork sausage.

    Makes me wonder if someone from SOuth Louisiana went west to cook for ranchers or drovers and took the recipe. Can anyone shed any light on this? I've never seen a recipe like this one in another Cajun or Acadian cook book.
    #22
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