Salt riseing Bread

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tx75
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2005/03/21 15:19:13 (permalink)

Salt riseing Bread

Where can i find the recipe for "Salt Riseing Bread"? Thanking you tx75@hotmail.com
#1

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    mickie49
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    RE: Salt riseing Bread 2005/03/21 15:51:32 (permalink)
    Try recipezaar, there are atleast 4 recipes there for salt rising bread.
    #2
    tx75
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    RE: Salt riseing Bread 2005/03/21 17:10:27 (permalink)
    Mickie, Thanks loads I think this will fill the bill. tx75
    #3
    Sarge 569
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    RE: Salt riseing Bread 2005/04/08 22:19:19 (permalink)
    Nobody mentions "stinky" when they talk about "salt rising bread" but that is what I remember about it. This is a recipe from my Grandmother and then Aunt for salt rising bread with a good sulfer oder.
    2 med. potatoes, diced 1/2 tsp baking soda
    4 Tbs. corn meal 1 tsp baking powder
    3Tbs. sugar 1/2 tsp salt
    1. Place above in a bowl, cover with boiling water. Set in a warm place over nite.
    2. Next day, pour off and save liquid, should be about 1 1/2 cups. Into liquid, stir 1 1/2 cups flour to make a thick creamy batter. Cover and set in a warm place til it doubles, about 2 hours
    3. Add: 2 cups warm water, 1 Tbs. sugar,1/2cup melted butter or oil
    4. Stir in enough flour to make a soft dough: 7 1/2-8 1/2 cups altogether. Knead about 15 mins. til smooth and elastic.
    5. Divide dough in half, place in greased pans. Let rise til doubled in bulk, 2-3 hours
    6. Pre-heat oven to 350 and bake about 45 mins.
    #4
    Rick F.
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    RE: Salt riseing Bread 2005/04/09 01:06:31 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by Sarge 569

    Nobody mentions "stinky" when they talk about "salt rising bread" but that is what I remember about it. This is a recipe from my Grandmother and then Aunt for salt rising bread with a good sulfer oder.
    This sounds just like that of my grandmother, who would leave it on a wind-proof, west-facing back porch. Stinky and absolutely wonderful!
    #5
    twodales
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    RE: Salt riseing Bread 2005/04/14 17:24:12 (permalink)
    Salt Rising bread makes the best toast! We used to stock up at a little bakery in downtown Battle Creek, Michigan after visiting my Grandparents. We'd shove it in the freezer and eat toast for months.

    It's hard to find now. Anyone know where I can buy some in Chicago?

    I did find some at a wonderful Roadfood-worthy bakery in La Grange, Indiana called Foltz's. Great old fashioned bakery.

    Thanks for the memories!
    #6
    Lucky Bishop
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    RE: Salt riseing Bread 2005/04/14 18:45:34 (permalink)
    Twodales: they sell salt-rising yeast at King Arthur Flour -- you can make your own salt-rising bread!

    http://shop.bakerscatalogue.com/items/item3316.html

    #7
    Julie Carey
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    RE: Salt riseing Bread 2005/05/02 13:57:05 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by twodales

    Salt Rising bread makes the best toast! We used to stock up at a little bakery in downtown Battle Creek, Michigan after visiting my Grandparents. We'd shove it in the freezer and eat toast for months.

    It's hard to find now. Anyone know where I can buy some in Chicago?

    I did find some at a wonderful Roadfood-worthy bakery in La Grange, Indiana called Foltz's. Great old fashioned bakery.

    Thanks for the memories!
    #8
    Julie Carey
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    RE: Salt riseing Bread 2005/05/02 13:59:12 (permalink)
    Does anyone know where I can buy SALT RISING BREAD.

    I live in Michigan Thanks
    #9
    Rick F.
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    RE: Salt riseing Bread 2005/05/02 16:56:03 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by Julie Carey

    Does anyone know where I can buy SALT RISING BREAD.
    [url='http://thebakerylady.com/']Here[/url] is one source, though I haven't purchased from it.

    I just did an advanced Google search on the phrase "salt rising bread" and the required word "sales."
    #10
    Sundancer7
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    RE: Salt riseing Bread 2005/05/02 18:00:11 (permalink)
    I have enjoyed salt risen bread but what creates the stink?

    I do agree that it makes good toast.

    I have never made it at my residence as I do not know how.

    Paul E. Smith
    Knoxville, TN
    #11
    Rick F.
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    RE: Salt riseing Bread 2005/05/02 22:30:26 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by Sundancer7

    I have enjoyed salt risen bread but what creates the stink?
    When my grandmother made it she let it ripen on a closed-in porch that caught full afternoon sunlight. As the liquid was "potato water," its fermentation and its action on the flour are the probable culprits. I think she would, if pressed, even cook potatoes that she didn't plan to eat any time soon so she'd have their cooking liquid.
    #12
    Franzia
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    RE: Salt riseing Bread 2005/05/03 15:35:56 (permalink)
    Hello, everyone. I just joined this forum because of this subject! I have spent the last 4 years trying to get salt rising bread starter to work - many hours, $$$, disappointments, etc. I am from TN but live in Southern AZ and no way to get salt rising bread here. My sister has sent me some that just wasn't up to par...another disappointment. I finally ordered King Arthurs Salt Rising Bread Starter and I tried this recipe. I was in salt rising bread heaven when I just smelled it - not to mention tasting it. It was so easy and could not have been more perfect! I am posting this recipe I found on the Internet by David Lee because I couldn't find the recipe on King Arthur's web site. Apparently others have had trouble locating it, also. I must stress, as David does, that keeping the starter and sponge at a consistent temperature is imperative! I'm blessed to have the Yogourmet yogurt maker that holds 2 qts., I think. (So worth the money for making cultured anything - not just yogurt.) I made the starter in it. I must tell you, tho, that I started it at night and the next morning it had blown the lid off the container AND the yogurt maker! Might be best to make do it early enough in the day to watch it. It didn't hurt anything, tho, not even a mess. I proceeded with the sponge and everything worked great. I, also, must tell you that although I love the aroma of salt rising bread, I gagged while trying to form the loaves! I was thinking that anyone who didn't know what they were making would have tossed it right there! The aroma while it was baking was incredible and the bread was absolutely perfect and the best I've ever had - period. I hope you'll try their salt rising yeast - I keep mine in the freezer. I'll be making it again next week. It does take all the days. It is so worth the time. Also, I have arthritic hands and must use the bread machine to make the dough and that worked just fine, too. Just put it on manual or dough cycle.

    Here's the recipe that David was kind enough to post:

    RISING BREAD USING KA SALT RISING STARTER
    This is a reprint of the recipe provided with the purchase of the special Salt-Rising Bread Starter sold by King Arthur (Item 3316 - $5.95 for 1 lb.)

    Salt-rising bread is a unique bread that is not a sourdough or a traditional yeast bread. It is a fine-grained loaf of bread that will stay fresh for almost a week, and has an aroma 'redolent of cheese'. The flavor comes from the light fermentation of the starter. I have never had the slightest difficulty in making salt-rising bread using this KA starter.

    This bread is best made over a two to three day period. Three day is easiest and best.

    A critical factor is keeping the starter and sponge at the proper temp. I personally recommend the use of a yogurt maker. This will keep the starter and sponge at the proper temp effortlessly. (If your yogurt maker uses small cups, fill the cups no more than halfway to allow for expansion. Combine all the contents together and blend before continuing on to the next step.)

    The Starter

    • 1 cup boiling water
    • 3 Tablespoons salt-rising yeast
    • 2 Tablespoons nonfat dry milk

    Pour the boiling water into a bowl (crockery is best). Sprinkle on the non-fat milk powder. Then measure and sprinkle the Salt Rising Yeast. Stir once to moisten all ingredients. After 2-3 minutes, stir again until thickened and evenly moistened.
    Cover the starter and put it in a place where it will remain in a warm environment between 100 - 105F for 12 hours.

    (Note: I usually make the starter in the early evening and then prepare the sponge the next day. If you are want to make this in 2 days, make the starter EARLY in the morning, so you can make the sponge that evening.)

    Making the Sponge

    • All of the Starter
    • 2 cups Bread Flour (KA is what I use!)
    • 1 cup hot water (not boiling -- around 105-110F)

    In a bowl, blend together 1 cup of flour and the hot water. Add the starter and mix together. Add the 2nd cup of flour and completely mix the sponge together very well. Cover and set sponge aside to rest in a warm environment (100-105F). KA says 2-4 hours, I never do less than 6 and usually let it rest overnight. (It blew both lids off both the Yogourmet when I left it overnight!)


    The Dough

    • All of the sponge from above
    • 1/2 cup warm water
    • 1/4 cup of melted or liquid fat - butter, vegetable shortening, lard or oil
    • 4 cups Bread Flour - measured right
    • 1 Tablespoon Nonfat Dry Milk
    • 3 Tablespoons Sugar - (Next time use 2 Tablespoons or less - too sweet)
    • 1 to 1 1/2 Tablespoons salt - (use it all - I use Kosher salt so close to 2 Tablespoons)
    • 1 Tablespoon Instant Yeast - SAF is great.

    Combine sponge, dry milk, yeast, flour, warm water, sugar salt and fat and mix well.

    Knead (if possible) in a stand mixer as this is a very sticky dough and stays that way. Mix around 5 minutes by machine, 8-10 minutes by hand until the dough looks a little shiny. It will pass the windowpane test. (I put it in the machine to mix for maybe 10 mn.- 5 to mix and 5 to knead - made perfect dough - great windowpane!)

    Divide the dough into two pieces. Place each in a lightly greased 8.5 x 4.5 pan. (I used glass pans.) Cover with a proof cover or oiled plastic wrap and let rise in a warm place until it has almost doubled. (It took close to 2 hours to raise - one in the oven, one under glass - baked the first one and had to wait for the second one to rise in the oven after it cooled down before making it - all worked out great!)

    Note: Rising time can be a little more variable than with a standard bread, so don't be afraid if it takes a little more time. There will not be as much oven spring as with a regular yeast loaf, so do not be surprised by that either. Do not let the dough over-proof however.

    Bake the bread in a well-preheated oven at 375F for 25-40 minutes (mine took 29 mn. - cover with foil after 5 minutes) The dough will read between 190F and 200F on an instant read thermometer when done.

    Remove from oven and let cool in pans placed on a rack for 10 minutes. Turn out of pans and let cook on a rack completely before slicing.

    (Personal Note from DvdLee: I find that 1 1/2 Tablespoons produces a bread that is too salty for my tastes. I add a scant Tablespoon of salt [an estimated 2.5 teaspoons). The dough does tend to rise quicker, but that is the only alteration in performance. You may prefer the KA level of salt--I use very little salt in cooking so I might be more sensitive to the taste.)

    (Personal note added from Franzia - I don't restrict salt in my diet - mostly because we live in southern Arizona and ya just need your salt here - and I like it. The recipe was perfect with the origional amount of salt - but, if you do restrict your salt, it would be best to take Davids advice!)

    Happy toast!
    #13
    sauceman
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    RE: Salt riseing Bread 2005/05/03 16:55:40 (permalink)
    Thanks for introducing this topic. Toast made from salt-risen bread was my breakfast every morning when I was a child. Back then, we could get very good salt-risen bread from the local "Super Dollar" bakery. Storebought versions nowadays can't touch it. In my part of the South, we always pronounced it with a long "i."

    Fred Sauceman
    Johnson City, Tennessee
    #14
    Franzia
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    RE: Salt riseing Bread 2005/05/03 18:30:29 (permalink)
    Hey, Fred - I was born and raised in Mosheim! By the way, when I was there last, Kroger's in Johnson City - the one on State of Franklin - sold salt rising bread that was pretty good - better than Peggy Ann's in Greeneville. We'd drive up there just to get it. Right on on the pronounciation! People thell me that I talk funny and I tell them that I don't talk funny, I've talked this way my whole life - you talk a little bit funny, tho. Usually get's both my point across and a chuckle. My husband is from Holland so we're on opposite sides of the spectrum! My parrot was raised in a Tennessee environment and everyone really gets a laugh when he talks. He sings Hank Williams, too!

    It's very nice to see several people from my neck of the woods on this forum. Glad I joined.

    #15
    sauceman
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    RE: Salt riseing Bread 2005/05/04 11:09:31 (permalink)
    Franzia,

    That Kroger's about a mile from my house, so I'll check out the salt-risen bread you recommend. Back when I was in radio full-time, I used to have fun listening to the outlanders pronounce the name of the community you're from. I'd let them struggle with it awhile and then tell them it's like MOSS I'M.

    Fred Sauceman
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    Franzia
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    RE: Salt riseing Bread 2005/05/06 14:17:30 (permalink)
    Thanks, Fred, for the jolt back in time! I hadn't thought about the pronounciation of Mosheim in a good while now. I'd tell them, the h is silent and give them another stab at it - didn't usually work, they'd still pronounce the o long.

    Hope Kroger's has the bread. There's a Mennonite store right before you'd get to Greeneville and we didn't like their salt risen bread etiher but they sure do have the best pickled okra and a real good rye bread mix for cheap - like $1.50. My sister in Chuckey sends it to me. We let the machine do the work then we form and bake it in the oven. I have a big problem getting rye to work out from scratch, too.

    Franzia
    #17
    Nannygeo
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    RE: Salt riseing Bread 2005/05/30 11:55:33 (permalink)
    Hi, Paul!

    Where do you buy your salt-risen bread locally. I can't find any!



    quote:
    Originally posted by Sundancer7

    I have enjoyed salt risen bread but what creates the stink?

    I do agree that it makes good toast.

    I have never made it at my residence as I do not know how.

    Paul E. Smith
    Knoxville, TN
    #18
    emilygenna2
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    RE: Salt riseing Bread 2008/11/23 10:39:25 (permalink)
    Does anyone know where I can purchase Salt Risen bread anywhere near Matthews, North Carolina? Lewisburg, West Virginia or where I can order it online? Thanks!!!!
    #19
    shortchef
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    RE: Salt riseing Bread 2008/11/23 17:17:46 (permalink)
    And does anyone have it in southwest Florida? I was born in Bristol, VA and my grandmother used to buy it at the store. I always loved it and have not had it since I was about 12. But I still remember how good it was. I may have to resort to making it....
    #20
    Manotee
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    RE: Salt riseing Bread 2009/01/05 12:03:44 (permalink)
    I used to buy salt risen bread at White's Grocery on Roan Street. When I moved to Raleigh, I found a Harris Teeter that sold store brand and deli salt risen bread, but they quickly disappeared. After that, I would stop by White's and stock up whenever I visited my parents. Now that I have no more relatives in JC, I had to find other ways to buy salt risen bread.

    Fortunately, a Kroger near me in Raleigh (Crredmore @ Lynn) started carrying the same bread - Country Recipe Salt Risen Bread. But it was sporadic and I found I could order directly from the source, Plantation Pride Bakery in Salem, VA. Their phone number is 1-540-389-9358.

    But I have seen the quality of the bread diminish over the years. At first I would find very dense loafs that hadn't risen, or very fluffy loafs that rose too much and had large gas pockets. The last several loaves have been more like Wonder bread, little taste or aroma, and fall apart at the least application of peanut butter or jelly. But the price isn't bad (about $15 for 4 loaves including shipping).

    I have found an on-line site - Dutch Maid Bakery - that offers salt risen, but it is $4.99 a loaf and $11.50 S&H. Way too expensive as long as there is an alternative.

    Maybe when I retire I will bake my own bread.

    Hank Lyle, SHHS '62, ETSU '67
    #21
    shelby1559
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    RE: Salt riseing Bread 2009/06/12 20:59:01 (permalink)
    You may want to check the news story on wdbj7.com Plantation Pride also goes by N2 Dough. My husband and I worked there under the previous owner and we left around 1998 or 1999. My husband was the plant mgr. then and I knowthe bread was excellent quality then. I can't speak for now.
    #22
    davidpratt
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    RE: Salt riseing Bread 2009/12/28 16:28:30 (permalink)
    I haven't tasted salt riseing bread in 30 years, since my grandmother passed, but this Christmas I was determined to make it myself.  I tried 4 times to get the starter going.  All failures.  I tried 4 different methods of keeping it warm overnight.  Some were too hot, some were too cold.  Anyone have tips on keeping starter the perfect 100 degree temperature overnight?  My stove doesn't have a pilot light, which is what my grandmother always used.
    #23
    Lindseyup67
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    RE: Salt riseing Bread 2009/12/30 19:51:19 (permalink)
    I used to buy salt rising bread from the local IGA grocery store 15 or so years ago in mid- lower Michigan that was out of this world! After not having it for years, I found it at a bakery in downtown Frankenmuth,Michigan this past summer.  Maybe it was me, but it was nowhere near as "stinky" and delicious as it was from the IGA....... I do have a recipe that does NOT call for any potatoes......I have held on to it for years and never tried it, as from all the recipes I see, it seems that potatoes are the key??
    post edited by Lindseyup67 - 2009/12/30 19:55:12
    #24
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