Southern Peach Cobbler

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JimInKy
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2003/12/31 06:37:17 (permalink)

Southern Peach Cobbler

A few years ago, I decided that I needed to learn how to make fruit cobblers. I grew up on them - blackberry, peach, blueberry and cherry - and missed enjoying them here at home.

After researching different types or styles of fruit cobbler, and experimenting with several recipes, I decided the best choice for me was a batter style. This type of fruit cobbler is simple, easy and practically foolproof. Here's a standard recipe, written up for use with canned peaches. On average, I make this cobbler about once a month, and invite someone over to enjoy it with.

SOUTHERN FRUIT COBBLER

This batter style cobbler recipe is from Julia Pence of Grayson, Kentucky, but is modified for use with canned peaches. The vanilla extract is not part of the original recipe.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

In the oven, melt 1 stick of unsalted butter in a square 8 inch baking pan while preparing the batter. (Be careful not to scorch or burn the butter.)

COMBINE:

1 cup white sugar
¾ cup self-rising flour
½ cup milk (more if desired)
½ teaspoon vanilla extract

Pour batter into pan with melted butter. Remove the syrup from a 29 ounce can of peaches and set aside. Add the peaches to the batter. Then add 5 tablespoons of the syrup. Finally, sprinkle the cobbler with 1 to 2 tablespoons of sugar.

Bake uncovered for 45-55 minutes in 350 degree oven or until cobbler is done and golden brown on top.

Notes: Place the pan in the center of the oven on a baking sheet or aluminum foil to catch possible overflow. You may want to use the broiler the last few minutes to nicely brown the top if you bake the cobbler covered with foil.

Recipe from What’s Cooking in Kentucky by Irene Hayes. Hayes Book Co., 1970. Hueysville, Ky.

To convert all-purpose flour to self-rising flour:

For one cup:
Measure one cup of all-purpose flour.
Remove 2 t. of the flour.
Then, add:
1 1/2 t. baking powder
1/2 t. salt

I have slightly different recipes for cobblers made with fresh and frozen fruits. Around 1998, Cook's Illustrated magazine published a comprehensive article on fruit cobblers that covered the four basic types. It's a remarkable article, intelligently thought out and well illustrated. That article is a good example of how Cook's educates both novice and advanced cook.
#1

13 Replies Related Threads

    Sundancer7
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    RE: Southern Peach Cobbler 2003/12/31 06:45:03 (permalink)
    Jim, I have done almost the same thing except I used apples covered with sugar and butter.

    I will try it with peaches and cherries.

    I have bought the apple crisp pre packaged mix at Walmart and added it to the top. works real good.

    Paul E. Smith
    Knoxville, TN
    #2
    Jellybeans
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    RE: Southern Peach Cobbler 2003/12/31 07:43:07 (permalink)
    Any chance of that article on the basic types of fruit cobblers being online? If it is, could you post the link here, Jim?

    Your recipe looks yummy. It also looks unusual to me because I was under the impression, having read an article about cobblers, slumps, crisps and crumbles at FoodTV.com, that a cobbler is like a crumble but with a liquid batter on top instead of a dry one like a crisp or crumble.

    If you're interested, I've a foolproof recipe for fruit crumble that you might want to try as another type of cobbler. Here's the link (scroll to the bottom of the article to reach the recipe):

    http://mimeograph.org/Old/epicurean/03/08/how_regina_got_her_culinary_groove_back_238.php

    It's adapted from the classic British crumble recipe by Delia Smith and has served as a quick, easy and cheap dessert for years on end for me
    #3
    RibDog
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    RE: Southern Peach Cobbler 2003/12/31 09:53:12 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by Jellybeans

    Any chance of that article on the basic types of fruit cobblers being online? If it is, could you post the link here, Jim?

    Your recipe looks yummy. It also looks unusual to me because I was under the impression, having read an article about cobblers, slumps, crisps and crumbles at FoodTV.com, that a cobbler is like a crumble but with a liquid batter on top instead of a dry one like a crisp or crumble.

    If you're interested, I've a foolproof recipe for fruit crumble that you might want to try as another type of cobbler. Here's the link (scroll to the bottom of the article to reach the recipe):

    http://mimeograph.org/Old/epicurean/03/08/how_regina_got_her_culinary_groove_back_238.php

    It's adapted from the classic British crumble recipe by Delia Smith and has served as a quick, easy and cheap dessert for years on end for me


    The cobblers I have always known in the South have been based on a liquid batter that you put in the bottom of a pan and then pour the fruit on top. The batter turns out more like a cake than a crumble.

    I have a recipe at home that came out of a cookbook for the Southwestern Cooks series on public tv. I realise it came from the southwest but it still has "South" in it. I can keep the ingredients in the cupboard and fridge and whip one up in a moment's notice. If you like, I will post it tonight when I get home.

    John
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    Jellybeans
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    RE: Southern Peach Cobbler 2003/12/31 10:07:21 (permalink)
    Thanks John! Any recipe is much appreciated!

    Ah yes, here is the little FoodTV Q & A that's got me confused re cobbler as they insist that the dough/mixture goes ON TOP of the fruit:

    http://www.foodnetwork.com/food/ck_culinary_qa/article/0,1971,FOOD_9796_1707589,00.html
    #5
    RibDog
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    RE: Southern Peach Cobbler 2003/12/31 10:51:01 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by Jellybeans

    Thanks John! Any recipe is much appreciated!

    Ah yes, here is the little FoodTV Q & A that's got me confused re cobbler as they insist that the dough/mixture goes ON TOP of the fruit:

    http://www.foodnetwork.com/food/ck_culinary_qa/article/0,1971,FOOD_9796_1707589,00.html


    Well, when I read their explanation, then my recipe and Jim's does not fall into any of their definitions. Go figure. What do they know anyway.

    I will post the recipe tonight.

    John
    #6
    seafarer john
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    RE: Southern Peach Cobbler 2003/12/31 12:05:20 (permalink)
    We make a "Plum torte" that sounds a lot like Rib Dog's definition of a southern cobbler. The batter is pretty thick, and plum halves are arranged on top and is baked in a spring form pan . It comes out like a kind of crumbly cake full of plums
    #7
    Jellybeans
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    RE: Southern Peach Cobbler 2003/12/31 12:06:34 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by seafarer john

    We make a "Plum torte" that sounds a lot like Rib Dog's definition of a southern cobbler. The batter is pretty thick, and plum halves are arranged on top and is baked in a spring form pan . It comes out like a kind of crumbly cake full of plums


    Your plum torte sounds like the German plum cake except that they make the cake-like base from a yeast-leavened dough! Still has the texture of cake though... and so bloody more-ish!!!
    #8
    seafarer john
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    RE: Southern Peach Cobbler 2003/12/31 12:07:19 (permalink)
    We make a "Plum torte" that sounds a lot like Rib Dog's definition of a southern cobbler. The batter is pretty thick, and plum halves are arranged on top and it is baked in a spring form pan . The dough rises up around the fruit as it bakes. It comes out like a kind of crumbly moist cake full of plums.
    #9
    RibDog
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    RE: Southern Peach Cobbler 2003/12/31 22:33:12 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by RibDog

    quote:
    Originally posted by Jellybeans

    Thanks John! Any recipe is much appreciated!

    Ah yes, here is the little FoodTV Q & A that's got me confused re cobbler as they insist that the dough/mixture goes ON TOP of the fruit:

    http://www.foodnetwork.com/food/ck_culinary_qa/article/0,1971,FOOD_9796_1707589,00.html


    Well, when I read their explanation, then my recipe and Jim's does not fall into any of their definitions. Go figure. What do they know anyway.

    I will post the recipe tonight.

    John


    Okay, here is the peach cobbler recipe that I use.

    It is from Southwest Tastes by Ellen Brown and printed by Great Chefs Publishing, 1990.

    Lazy Man’s Peach Cobbler
    Y.O. Ranch, Mountain Home, TX


    (Serves12)

    Three 29-ounce cans sliced cling peaches
    ¼ pound butter or margarine, melted
    1 cup unbleached all-purpose flour
    1 ½ cups sugar
    2 teaspoons baking powder
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    1 cup milk (whole)
    1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
    ½ teaspoon ground nutmeg (fresh)

    Preheat the oven to 350 degrees and grease a 9-by-13-inch baking pan.

    Drain the peaches, reserving the juice, and set aside. Melt the butter or margarine, and pour into the bottom of the pan.

    In a mixing bowl, mix the flour and 1 cup of the sugar with the baking powder and salt. Whisk in the milk and ½ cup of the reserved peach juice. Pour into the pan on top of the melted butter.

    Pour the remaining sugar over the peaches and add the cinnamon and nutmeg, mixing them together with your fingers. Pour the peaches over the batter and for 45 minutes to 1 hour in the center of the preheated over.

    Serve warm. (I like it with vanilla ice cream.)

    Hope you like it.

    John
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    JimInKy
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    RE: Southern Peach Cobbler 2003/12/31 23:15:15 (permalink)
    Jellybeans, This article might help clarify some questions you have about cobblers. You'll note it does not mention the batter style cobbler that John and I offered recipes for. The subject of the article followed her family traditions and makes a crust from pie dough, biscuit dough or dough crumbs. My mother made all her cobblers with pie dough.

    When you're thinking of a batter style cobbler, think: "adding cake mix batter to fruit to make pie." As I'm too lazy to make an old-fashioned cobbler, batter style is the way for me. They are delicous, especially blueberry and peach.

    By Reagan Walker
    The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

    Dana Phelps-Marschalk has found a simple way to be considered a culinary genius.

    When there's company at her Brownwood Park home for dinner, an organizational meeting of her dance troupe, or a gathering of the girlfriends to trade clothes and gossip, Phelps-Marschalk provides the no-fail crowd pleaser: cobbler.

    "It's so funny. Cobbler is probably the easiest thing in the world to make. A real no-brainer," said Phelps-Marschalk. "But when you play around with different fruits and combinations, people think it's miraculous. They just go on and on like nobody else can do it."

    Cobblers that feature such fruits as mangoes and raspberries and kiwis and pears have earned her the title "cobbler queen" among some of her friends.

    And now is the sweetest time of the year to strut her stuff. The basic combination of fruit and dough, perhaps topped with ice cream or heavy cream, just sings summer.

    Of course, as with anything so dearly loved in the South, what we call these fruit-and-dough delights depends on whom you are asking. But usually, a cobbler is fruit, baked with a crust on top, whether it's biscuit dough, pie dough or dough crumbs.

    A crisp is fruit topped with a crumbly mixture of butter, sugar, flour and, sometimes, nuts. Other crisp toppings include oatmeal, buttered bread crumbs, cookie crumbs, graham cracker crumbs and cake crumbs.

    From there, the variations begin to blossom. A brown betty is similar to a crisp but with layers of crumbs rather than just a topping. A grunt or slump resembles a cobbler but is steamed on top of the stove rather than baked, and so forth.

    Such fruit desserts have been around a long time. Theories in food-history circles suggest that because they are simple, cobblers and similar fruit desserts were handed down orally for years before they were ever recorded.

    One of the earliest written references comes from the 1839 cookbook "The Kentucky Housewife," wherein Lettice Bryan mentions a peach potpie, writing, "Although it is not a fashionable pie for company, it is very excellent for family use, with cold sweet milk."

    Today, Phelps-Marschalk and many other home cooks would agree that cobbler is fine for family but would beg to differ on the idea of not serving it to company. After all, in this do-it-fast age, anything so pure and tasty and quick to fix is fashionable.

    And all you need is one good recipe. Phelps-Marschalk, an Augusta native, borrowed her mother's, which came from a local Master's Tournament cookbook. It was a classic peach cobbler recipe, and for the most part, she simply varies the two cups of fruit.

    "The only fruit I've tried that absolutely did not work was oranges," Phelps-Marschalk said.

    Experience has taught her to make some modifications now and then. The sweeter the fruit, the less sugar she adds to it. If the fruit is very sweet or has a distinctive flavor, such as mangoes, she'll cut the sugar in the dough as well.

    And sometimes, the occasion calls for the classic. "I've never combined anything with peaches. It's just so good in its purest form," she said. "The epitome of the Southern dessert."

    Then she added, "Of course, my favorite time to eat it is for breakfast."
    #11
    JimInKy
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    RE: Southern Peach Cobbler 2004/01/03 02:57:31 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by Jellybeans

    Any chance of that article on the basic types of fruit cobblers being online? If it is, could you post the link here, Jim?

    The Cook's Illustrated cobbler article is available online, but one cannot access it without a paid subscription to the online Cook's Illustrated.

    The issue I used moved to Arizona, but I think my library manager has ordered the Cook's Illustrated archive. If so, I can copy and scan the article to you. The article has a bunch of illustrations and charts. I would need an email address for you.

    Another option: Subscribe to CI. They have a remarkable feature for folks just wanting a particular article or recipe; they allow one to join on a monthly basis for $3.95/ month. You continue being billed for each month until you cancel.

    I trust this organization, so if you care to do that, I'm sure you'll have no problems with billing. In short, you can buy that article for $3.95 U.S.

    Visit Cook's at: http://www.cooksillustrated.com/search.asp

    Here's the title, description and date of the article:

    Mix-and-Match Fruit Cobblers
    Four cobbler toppings and a fruit chart give cooks freedom of choice based on fruit, time, and ingredients on hand.
    July, 1996 issue
    #12
    Vince Macek
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    RE: Southern Peach Cobbler 2004/01/03 08:31:26 (permalink)
    It's a little early in the morning to make cobbler, but I can't wait to whip up a batch! This is possibly why canned peaches were invented.

    Mmmm, peach cobbler...hhaarrrggllll...
    #13
    JimInKy
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    RE: Southern Peach Cobbler 2004/01/03 17:16:11 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by Jellybeans

    Any chance of that article on the basic types of fruit cobblers being online? If it is, could you post the link here, Jim?

    The Gods and Goddesses are smiling on you, Jellybeans. It turns out I had made a paper copy of the Cook's Illustrated article on cobblers and forgot about it. I wanted to return a recipe to a loose leaf binder, when I noticed the article in the back sleave. I'm losing my mind!

    I can scan and send it to you if you want to provide an email address. You can email me through Roadfood, and receive email through Roadfood (if you enable it).
    #14
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