Stir-Fry Sauce

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js8489
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2003/08/05 03:18:03 (permalink)

Stir-Fry Sauce

Does anyone have a stir-fry sauce? I tried a few but they weren't good.
#1

10 Replies Related Threads

    yumbo
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    RE: Stir-Fry Sauce 2003/08/05 12:54:43 (permalink)
    I assume that you're talking about the pre-made stuff that you buy at the local store. I don't think any of them are any good, and it's pretty easy if you make your own - some peanut oil to start stir frying, then garlic, soy sauce, chicken broth, etc. I'm not the expert, but I suspect that there is no such thing as a "stir fry sauce" in Asian cuisine - it's the byproduct of adding flavoring to stuff you're cooking in the wok (or frying pan). I suggest that you're better off getting a simple Chinese stir fry recipe.
    #2
    carlton pierre
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    RE: Stir-Fry Sauce 2004/10/29 20:49:23 (permalink)
    I really like an oil made by a company called "Ty Ling" for my stir frys. it is very flavorful and aromatic as well ( smells really good). That's for frying. I've tried adding prepared stir fry stuff, as well as just soy, as well as concocting my own. More & more, I prefer to just stir fry with the oil, and season before I eat.

    carl reitz
    #3
    RubyRose
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    RE: Stir-Fry Sauce 2004/10/29 21:34:34 (permalink)
    These recipes came from a cafeteria in downtown Philadelphia in the 70's called Eden:

    STIR FRY SAUCES

    Each recipe makes 2 servings but can be doubled.

    BASIC STIR FRY SAUCE

    1 1/ 2 tsp. sesame oil
    1/ 2 tsp. minced garlic
    1/ 2 tsp. minced ginger
    1/ 2 cup chicken broth
    1 Tbs. soy sauce
    1 Tbs. brown sugar
    1/ 8 tsp. Tabasco
    1/ 2 tsp. salt
    1/ 4 tsp. pepper
    1 1/ 2 tsp. lemon or lime juice
    1 1/ 2 tsp.cornstarch
    1 Tbs. rice wine or sherry

    Heat the sesame oil in a small saucepan. Add the ginger and garlic and stir-fry 15-30 second over medium heat to bring out the flavor. Add the chicken broth, soy sauce, brown sugar, Tabasco, salt, pepper, and lemon juice. Bring just to a boil, stirring. Dissolve the cornstarch in the wine and whisk into the sauce. Heat until sauce thickens and reaches a full boil. Simmer for 30 seconds. Remove from the heat and set aside.

    GARLIC SESAME STIR FRY SAUCE

    1/ 2 tsp. pepper
    2 Tbs. soy sauce
    3 Tbs. chicken broth
    1 Tbs. sugar
    2 1/ 4 tsp. lemon juice
    1/ 3 cup sesame oil
    2 1/ 4 tsp. minced garlic
    1 tsp. cornstarch mixed with 1 1/ 2 tsp. water

    Combine the pepper, soy sauce, chicken broth, sugar and lemon juice. In a small saucepan heat the sesame oil. Add the garlic and saute 1 minute until soft but not browned. Add the soy sauce mixture and bring just to a boil. Whisk in the cornstarch mixture and let boil 20 seconds. Remove from the heat.

    #4
    BT
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    RE: Stir-Fry Sauce 2004/10/30 01:27:15 (permalink)
    I can't figure out why anybody would use something called "Stir Fry Sauce"? Stir-frying is a cooking method. Do we have something called "Frying Sauce"? Or "Baking Sauce"? The appropriate condiments to put in a stir-fry dish depend on what else is going in. There are lots of books on Chinese cooking (such as Martin Yan's) loaded with stir-fry recipes that tell you what to put in besides the main ingredients (the meat, vegetables).

    One good book to start with is Bruce Cost's "Asian Ingredients". This will familiarize you with the labels on Asian condiments, offers brand recommendations and elucidates the differences among, say, soy or bean sauces. Cost also goes through the pros and cons of various oils and his top recommendation seems to go to Lion & Globe Peanut Oil from Hong Kong (readily available in Asian markets--at least those in San Francisco) which I have used for years now and agree is tops for frying. Unlike domestic peanut oils, it has a wonderful peanut smell.

    Common stir fry ingredients include: garlic, fresh minced or grated ginger, soy sauce, black bean sauce, chili oil or paste, hoisin sauce, chicken or vegetable broth, fish sauce, oyster sauce, sugar and Shaoxing rice wine (or sherry as a substitute).
    #5
    RubyRose
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    RE: Stir-Fry Sauce 2004/10/30 08:31:47 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by BT

    I can't figure out why anybody would use something called "Stir Fry Sauce"?

    I use it because I like to make my family something different once in a while after 10 hours away from home at my job and don't want to make the investment in the equipment and ingredients for authentic stir-frying, as you describe it. Plus, I like the taste of "Faux Stir-Fry Sauce".
    #6
    BT
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    RE: Stir-Fry Sauce 2004/10/30 12:49:42 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by RubyRose

    quote:
    Originally posted by BT

    I can't figure out why anybody would use something called "Stir Fry Sauce"?

    I use it because I like to make my family something different once in a while after 10 hours away from home at my job and don't want to make the investment in the equipment and ingredients for authentic stir-frying, as you describe it. Plus, I like the taste of "Faux Stir-Fry Sauce".


    The person who started this thread DIDN'T like the taste of the "faux stir fry sauce" (s)he had tried, which is my point. The recipes YOU posted I wouldn't call "faux" at all. They look quite good and my criticism was directed more toward the bottled commercial "stir fry sauce" which, to me, taste like something "bottled" and "commercial". All I'm saying is that one can take the same or similar ingredients to what you have in your recipes and make many other combinations. I find it a lot of fun to experiment just as I do in more ordinary Western cooking.

    The "equipment" I use consists of a cast-iron wok I got at Macy's basement for around $11, a cooking spoon or two (couple $ anywhere) and maybe $10-$15 worth of assorted Asian condiments (the ones I described like soy sauce and chili paste) in my pantry along with the ketchup and mustard. I use a cast iron wok because I have an electric stove (alas!) and I find it nearly impossible to do stir frying on an electric stove with anything else because you can't get the heat high enough to prevent other woks from cooling down and stopping the frying as soon as you add the ingredients. Probably a regular cast iron frying pan would be a better substitute than other kinds of woks.

    You may not believe me, but seriously, doing it the "old fashioned (for an Asian person) way"--which, again, is essentially what you are doing in those recipes you posted--is no harder and allows you to experiment with flavors and variety the way you might with any other style of cooking. The only hard part might be getting the ingredients if you don't live near a town or city with a significant Asian population but any of this stuff is easily available mail-order on the internet at places like http://www.ethnicgrocer.com .

    #7
    chezkatie
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    RE: Stir-Fry Sauce 2004/10/30 13:15:49 (permalink)
    This is a little off subject but do any of you have a great tried and true recipe for lo mein. My granddaughter just loves it and I would like to make it once in a while instead of fried rice.
    #8
    zataar
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    RE: Stir-Fry Sauce 2004/10/30 22:56:35 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by chezkatie

    This is a little off subject but do any of you have a great tried and true recipe for lo mein. My granddaughter just loves it and I would like to make it once in a while instead of fried rice.

    I have a number of different lo mein recipes. Does your granddaughter like the brothy kind or the rather dry kind? Lo mein is such great comfort food. Something one would want to make for a grandchild.!
    #9
    chezkatie
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    RE: Stir-Fry Sauce 2004/10/31 08:11:08 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by zataar

    quote:
    Originally posted by chezkatie

    This is a little off subject but do any of you have a great tried and true recipe for lo mein. My granddaughter just loves it and I would like to make it once in a while instead of fried rice.

    I have a number of different lo mein recipes. Does your granddaughter like the brothy kind or the rather dry kind? Lo mein is such great comfort food. Something one would want to make for a grandchild.!


    She likes the rather dry kind.......thanks for any recipe you can give me.
    #10
    zataar
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    RE: Stir-Fry Sauce 2004/11/01 13:20:24 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by chezkatie

    This is a little off subject but do any of you have a great tried and true recipe for lo mein. My granddaughter just loves it and I would like to make it once in a while instead of fried rice.

    Here is a recipe for an all purpose lo mein sauce.


    For 3/4 to 1 pound cooked lo mein noodles:

    Bring 2 1/2 cups chicken broth, low sodium if using canned or boxed, to a simmer.
    Add 1 walnut size piece peeled ginger
    1 smashed scallion
    1 crushed garlic clove
    Simmer 15 minutes.
    Add 1 star anise and simmer 5 minutes more. Remove star anise.
    Allow broth to cool, then strain. The seasoned broth may be done 1 or 2 days in advance. To the cooled broth add:
    5 TBL. soy sauce
    2 TBL. chinese rice wine or dry sherry
    1 1/2 tsp. dark sesame oil
    Black pepper to taste
    1 1/2 tsp. sugar
    2 TBL. cornstarch
    Stir fry desired vegetables and/or meat, about 1 pound total, stir sauce ingredients well, then add to vegetables and meat in wok. Stir constantly for a few minutes until thickened. Add cooked noodles and stir to combine.



    #11
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